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How good at science do you have to be to succeed in this field?

I'm really terrible at chem, bio and all those sciences. Sometimes I wonder if I can even do this. I'm a senior pre-nursing student in college and am failing chem class right now. i'm usually borderline failing in these courses. I'm even beginning to wonder if any schools will accept me. My science grades aren't impressive at all. So, how well do you have to be at this stuff to get in? And do you actually use it on the job? thanks

Hoping2beRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Rehab, CICU, ICU Pulmonary, ER, OB.

I'm really terrible at chem, bio and all those sciences. Sometimes I wonder if I can even do this. I'm a senior pre-nursing student in college and am failing chem class right now. i'm usually borderline failing in these courses. I'm even beginning to wonder if any schools will accept me. My science grades aren't impressive at all. So, how well do you have to be at this stuff to get in? And do you actually use it on the job? thanks

Im not a CNM, but seen your post and wanted to say, just because your not good at it doesn't mean you have to borderline fail. there are MANY MANY resources out there. Go to a book store, check out chemistry for dummies, a&p for dummies. They are wonderful and pulled my grade up from a C to an A!

Good luck!

Amberholmestm

Specializes in aspiring midwife.

Discovernursing.com has a list of nursing programs with no waiting list. It figures that these programs are not unbelievably selective, either. I am taking pre-reqs at Snow College (Utah) - one that's listed on the no-waiting list. My study partner this semester was repeating Anatomy, Physiology, AND Chemistry. She also repeated at least one other class previously and didn't pass with all As the second time around, either. She was accepted into the LPN program at Snow to start next year (though she is postponing it a year to have a baby :) (Congrats!). Bridge programs are more wearying but not as hard to get into, especially with some experience as an LPN or ADN.

The science classes are hard - make no mistake about that. I recommend taking one at a time and giving it your all. Do, say, Anatomy and Nutrition, etc - space out the sciences and take one over the summer to help with spacing and still getting it all done. Find a friend in your classes who are repeating the class. They will know the ins and outs of the teacher's style and hopefully have more of a handle on the subject material since it's the second time around. They'll also sympathize with it being HARD material. They may even have old tests and homework that you can look over to get an idea of what the teacher wants. Last, get to know your profs. Professors will bend over backward to help out a student who has real heart. I've known profs to bump a grade up a couple of points for a student they know has worked hard and has a real desire. Also, when it comes to applying to nursing schools, your references and clinical experiences can make up for quite a few GPA points - REALLY. For example, I went to the University of Utah's orientation for nursing applicants the other night. They are real snobs and have twice as many prereqs as any other nursing school in the state - they also are pretty selective with their applicants. Last year their average GPA for new students was 3.7, but a couple of students got accepted with GPAs as low as 3.2 because the rest of their app was so exceptional. That's a pretty big discrepancy, and for a pretty picky school, so be encouraged.

Don't lose faith! You can do it! The hard work will only make you appreciate your accomplishments so much more.

http://www.discovernursing.com/nursing-programs-without-waiting-lists

My anatomy instructor told us it's better to take 4 years if you have to and get *all A's*, then to try and "finish quickly" and barely pass with C's.

He's a PHD and told us the clinical programs are VERY competitive right now and some schools won't even look at you if you have less than a B in any of your core classes or (gasp, like me) have repeats.

So, my advice to myself (many years back) would have been to take ONE class ONLY and just concentrate on that one class to get the highest grade possible.

Little_Babycatcher

Has 3 years experience. Specializes in Maternal-Fetal.

I agree with what mleigh says. My school (Bachelor's RN) wouldn't even look at applicants if they made less than a C, but students that get in usually had As and Bs.

Take it slow. If it's a class that you think will give you trouble, try to only take that one class so you can put all your energy into it. Utilize study guides, TAs, tutors, anyone that you think can help you. Good luck! :)

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