hospice training???

  1. hi fellow nurses,

    i am wanting input on how to get hospice specific nursing training. I have been a nurse for almost 20 years, most of it psych.

    i want to become a hospice nurse.. well i want to give it a try.... i need pharmacology, physiology, and assessment skills updated. i would l ike to do an internship, or ahve a mentor at a free standing hospice, if such a thing exists, does any body know of an opportunity for that? or is there a nurse practitioner program which focuses on palliative care?

    i don't want to have a huge patient load dropped on me, when i feel unsure of my skills. i don't want to be finishing up my work on my own time, i want a work load that is geared to my skill level -- the problem i keep encountering as i try to move out of psych, is that with my years of experience, i would be receiving a high rate of pay, and so they seem to want to just fast track me into a full (over loaded) patient load..... i don't mind taking less pay, to take a leisurly training, so that i could take what ever time i need to become competent (really this is not unrealistic, i also have graduate degrees, and really like to study), but i just can't seem to find an institution able to accomodate my desire for a thorough training--

    any suggestions would be greatly appreciated... thanks
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    About psychRN@ash

    Joined: Dec '04; Posts: 2

    10 Comments

  3. by   aimeee
    You haven't given us an idea of your geographic area...Madonna University in Livonia Michigan has a Master of Science in Hospice:

    http://www.munet.edu/pages/mshhospice.cfm
  4. by   psychRN@ash
    thanks aimee,

    i am in central california. anything a little less urban than west detroit that you know of?
  5. by   aimeee
    The San Diego Hospice has some partnership programs in effect. Check out their Center for Palliative Studies website: http://64.85.16.230/sdh/educate/index.html
  6. by   suebird3
    I am interested in Hospice,too. We have one of the first free standing Hospice Homes right down the street. I am not really keen on MedSurg right now. Would my experience as a LTC nurse count? And would I need any other courses? I just got my BS....
  7. by   aimeee
    When you say you just got your BS, does that mean you are newly licensed? LTC experience is helpful but you may need more depending on the position you are going for and what the exact situation is. By all means, check out that hospice house down the street! It never hurts to make inquiries. You might start by doing some volunteer work there and getting a feel for things.
  8. by   suebird3
    I had been an LPN for 17 years before going on for my degree. Had a bad experience at one of the local hospitals; thus, my not really wanting to do MedSurg right now. The Hospice that our facility deals w/seems pretty decent; it is the moving from the "known" to the "unknown" that is scary. Till later...
  9. by   aimeee
    If you have 17 years in LTC then you may very well be ready to enter hospice care now. Some hospices have a separate facilities team and since you know the facility ropes, you would have an advantage there. You're right, change is kind of scary, but exhilirating too. Good luck to you!
  10. by   suebird3
    Aimee,
    Thanks for the messege! I have one (!) more 11-7 to work this week; perhaps when I have a day off, and the weather is better, I will at least put in my app. I'll keep ya posted!
  11. by   tricia1
    Quote from psychRN@ash
    hi fellow nurses,

    i am wanting input on how to get hospice specific nursing training. I have been a nurse for almost 20 years, most of it psych.

    i want to become a hospice nurse.. well i want to give it a try.... i need pharmacology, physiology, and assessment skills updated. i would l ike to do an internship, or ahve a mentor at a free standing hospice, if such a thing exists, does any body know of an opportunity for that? or is there a nurse practitioner program which focuses on palliative care?

    i don't want to have a huge patient load dropped on me, when i feel unsure of my skills. i don't want to be finishing up my work on my own time, i want a work load that is geared to my skill level -- the problem i keep encountering as i try to move out of psych, is that with my years of experience, i would be receiving a high rate of pay, and so they seem to want to just fast track me into a full (over loaded) patient load..... i don't mind taking less pay, to take a leisurly training, so that i could take what ever time i need to become competent (really this is not unrealistic, i also have graduate degrees, and really like to study), but i just can't seem to find an institution able to accomodate my desire for a thorough training--

    any suggestions would be greatly appreciated... thanks
    I also am a Psych. RN interested in changing over to Hospice.I specifacaly want free- standing unit as I have done home health for psych before and do not like the driving/ the isolation from colleeges. I did training for Hospice volunteer in Virginia when we lived there w/ the idea to check into it as employment opportunity but Husband came done w/ short notice orders to Wa. State. Have worked now 10 years in State Hospital. Ready for a change. Got re-interested in Hospice after being w/ husb. 3 weeks in hospital for esophogeal cancer.Missing some of the gratification of more medicaly oriented nursing.Let me know what happens with you.
  12. by   frisky
    Quote from tricia1
    I also am a Psych. RN interested in changing over to Hospice.I specifacaly want free- standing unit as I have done home health for psych before and do not like the driving/ the isolation from colleeges. I did training for Hospice volunteer in Virginia when we lived there w/ the idea to check into it as employment opportunity but Husband came done w/ short notice orders to Wa. State. Have worked now 10 years in State Hospital. Ready for a change. Got re-interested in Hospice after being w/ husb. 3 weeks in hospital for esophogeal cancer.Missing some of the gratification of more medicaly oriented nursing.Let me know what happens with you.
    The inpatient unit hospice that I work at has nurses from all backgrounds. They
    have excellent education program for new employees. I would suggest if you
    are interested in hospice to work at an inpatient facility at first if possible.
    There you will have experienced nurses around you who can assist you with
    questions you may have and you can tap into there knowledge base. Home care
    hospice would be difficult if you have not had recent medsurg or oncology experience considering the type and amounts of medication many hospice
    patients recieve. Good luck with you decision.

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