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Help, I have clinical tomorrow

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by Musicnme81 Musicnme81 (New Member) New Member

1,227 Profile Views; 12 Posts

I am a first semester nursing student and we start clinical tomorrow. We will be giving meds for the first time and I was wondering what is the best way to learn them? I have 20 meds to learn by 7 am, there action, class, side effects, and nsg implications. I'm freaking out because our instructor will send us home if we mess up the least little bit. UGH! Also, in my patient assignment..my pt's dx is failure to thrive, afib c rvr, and dehydration. Why would he get whiskey in the evening with his meal?

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73 Posts; 1,756 Profile Views

I don't know how your school does things, but my school requires us to make up a "med card" for each med we pass. We still need to know what we're doing, but having the med cards that we've made up in our pockets to lean on if we need to is a nice safety net. Plus, as we add to the set, we have our own little personal drug reference, since some of the drugs we pass today, may be the same drugs that we pass to another patient next semester, etc. and we can refer back to the cards we've already made up.

As far as learning your meds now, look each one up and read about it, but more importantly make sure you know what med class each drug belongs in and what each med class does and how each med class works. For nursing implications, I try to focus on the big things like info about vitals or other monitoring that should be done, or also any drug interactions and adverse reactions or side effects. Also, it may help to think of the meds in terms of your patient- why does your patient take the med? What effect is it expected to produce? Etc...

I don't know if that helps at all or not. Good luck!

ETA: As far as the whiskey, the only thing I can think of is it is that patient's regular routine, and it isn't contraindicated in any way. They're patients, not prisoners, they still have the right to decide what they do (including what they consume or if they smoke) even if we as health care providers would prefer that they not do those things... maybe one of the more experienced nurses will have a better answer.

Edited by MrazFan
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RochesterRN-BSN has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Psych, ER, Resp/Med, LTC, Education.

399 Posts; 5,405 Profile Views

Wiskey...well did he come from a LTC facility where he was getting this? How old? Hospice? if he is a regular consumer of the wiskey they would need to worry about withdrawal and treat symptoms....maybe for some reasons......they would rather let him have his drink if quality of life is more important --like if he is really old-- then deal with withdrawal...maybe for some medical reason it is more of a health risk to have him go into withdrawal or maybe the meds he would need to treat w/d are contraindicated for him for some reason......I would be curious myself as the reasoning behind this.

ETOH w/d in my experience is often missed in a medical/surgical setting when the patient is not a severe drinker and/or denies use or underreports use.

As far as memorizing the meds..........god I don't what to tell you, except GOOD LUCK!!!!!!

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186 Posts; 3,937 Profile Views

Just wanted to say good luck on the meds! The most I had on one day was 23-- and it was tough. I personally feel it is unrealistic to expect anyone to learn so many meds in such a short period of time, but I don't make the rules.

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12 Posts; 1,227 Profile Views

At pre-conference this am I mentioned dt's to my instructor and she was over joyed that I found that out, so yes that was why he gets whiskey. Thanks for your reply : )

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10 Posts; 879 Profile Views

Clinical studies have shown that whiskey (aged) substantially boost phenol levels in the blood which prevent heart disease. This is a stretch but the only thing I can think of....(other than maintaining this man's "routine" as was suggested in a previous post).

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12 Posts; 1,227 Profile Views

We get to clinical at 7, we are on the floor after pre conferecnce by 8 and have to be off the floor by 10:30. We have 9 people in our clinical group and its so hectic trying to get everything done because as a 1st semester nsg student we have to have our instructor to help with everything or monitor everything we do. I just don't feel that is enough time to give baths, change beds, give meds, do vitals, and chart. It's hectic!!

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612 Posts; 8,255 Profile Views

first day of clinical and youre giving meds? YIKES! thats nerve wrecking.

divide the meds into common themes. ..anti-fungals, anti-hypertensives, flora vitamins etc etc you will see sometimes people take a bunch of the same type of meds...they dont expect you to memorize them, 20 meds? first day? you poor thing. i laughed when i saw the title (Help first day of clinical, this -is- nursing school) but no wonder youre feeling overwhelmed.

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12 Posts; 1,227 Profile Views

It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be thank goodness. I learned as much as I possibly could and I guess my instructor seen that I actually put forth an effort so she let me look at my notes for 3 of my meds that I got confused on. She even told me I did a great job (very motivating). Thanks for replying : )

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186 Posts; 3,937 Profile Views

first day of clinical and youre giving meds? YIKES! thats nerve wrecking.

divide the meds into common themes. ..anti-fungals, anti-hypertensives, flora vitamins etc etc you will see sometimes people take a bunch of the same type of meds...they dont expect you to memorize them, 20 meds? first day? you poor thing. i laughed when i saw the title (Help first day of clinical, this -is- nursing school) but no wonder youre feeling overwhelmed.

My CI expected us to memorize them and then spout them off first thing in front of our classmates. One day I had 4 anti-hypertensives(out of 16 meds total)--all different classes and with (mostly) different side effects. My CI was not pleased with my performance.... :(

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612 Posts; 8,255 Profile Views

dang ..our CI's allow us to do prep sheets. I used to think they took up too much time, but they actually help you remember. Same thing, implications action therapeutic effect classification, specific reason why it was prescribed. it helped me remember, but gosh in 101 we did communication and bed baths lol. Our last 2 rotations were injections subcutaneous of course

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