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Got thrown to the float pool .. so I decided to make a change

Specializes in Neurology.

So I worked on a Neurology unit for 5 years specializing in stroke. Management decided to restructure the entire hospital making our unit of dedicated nurses into an observation unit where the ratio went to 7:1 and only one nurse per shift needs to be there MAYBE 2 . Also they moved the neuro patients to the 4th floor and have us floating all around the hospital.

So I applied for and got an On call overnight position with hospice 12am to 0830 am with it being hourly pay a little nervous about switching any advice for making a switch in specialties ?

Make sure you get a good orientation. Start reading everything you can about hospice. Will you be able to earn enough since it's on call?

FWIW, I think you made the correct decision. I've worked inpatient as the only nurse and did OK...luckily. But I went to a unit shortly after they had a near miss event (baby didn't die or have adverse effects but VERY easily could have) and only one nurse was on at the time which was pretty standard. After that the rule was two nurses no matter the census, and probably 80% of the time it really didn't require 2 nurses. Good luck, I think if you can do neurology you'll be fine at hospice.

Edited by Nunya
typos

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.

allnurses Hospice forum has great advice. https://allnurses.com/hospice-palliative-c16/

I'm concerned that a Hospice company hired you for on-call night shift without having any Hospice experience. On call involves patients/families in crisis, actively dying or already passed needing to be pronounced. One needs to have full knowledge of medications used in Hospice, symptom management skills, and understanding of dying process to be able to educate families, SNF facility staff along with experience pronouncing death. One needs a minimum of 3-6 months experience on days to hone these skills and all the oddball situations that occur. There is rarely backup available on nights--your it.

It would be better for you to work inpatient Hospice to gain those skills. Please confirm that you will have an orientation of more than 1 month to prevent being thrown to the wolves.

I loved Hospice and skills learned in my 2 years there served me in the next 20 years performing palliative care with many clients in end stage illness.

Edited by NRSKarenRN
spelling

cmurra6745, ADN

Specializes in Neurology.

7 hours ago, NRSKarenRN said:

allnurses Hospice forum has great advice. https://allnurses.com/hospice-palliative-c16/

I'm concerned that a Hospice company hired you for on-call night shift without having any Hospice experience. One call involves patients/families in crisirs, actively dying or already passed needing to be pronounced. One needs to have full knowledge of medications used in Hospice, symptom management skills, and understanding of dying process to be able to educate families, SNF facility staff along with experience pronouncing death. One needs a minimum of 3-6 months experience on days to hone these skills and all the oddball situations that occur. There is rarely backup available on nights--your it.

It would be better for you to work inpatient Hospice to gain those skills. Please confirm that you will have an orientation of more than 1 month to prevent being thrown to the wolves.

I loved Hospice and skills learned in my 2 years there served me in the next 20 years performing palliative care with many clients in end stage illness.

Yes I will have a month of orientation on days . Have dealt with many families in crisis with palliative care and cmo In acute care however I know this will be different and im ready for the task

14 hours ago, Nunya said:

Make sure you get a good orientation. Start reading everything you can about hospice. Will you be able to earn enough since it's on call?

FWIW, I think you made the correct decision. I've worked inpatient as the only nurse and did OK...luckily. But I went to a unit shortly after they had a near miss event (baby didn't die or have adverse effects but VERY easily could have) and only one nurse was on at the time which was pretty standard. After that the rule was two nurses no matter the census, and probably 80% of the time it really didn't require 2 nurses. Good luck, I think if you can do neurology you'll be fine at hospice.

Yes I will earn enough. It's cents less an hour then im currently making and I get paid the whole shift regardless of a call or not and mileage

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