Tips for new RNs

  1. I am graduating this December and am starting to apply for jobs, as I apply I am wondering if any one has any tips to give a new RN?
  2. Visit morganeast profile page

    About morganeast

    Joined: Oct '18; Posts: 2

    4 Comments

  3. by   egglady
    Do NOT look down on LPNs or CNAs or anyone, and NEVER say "that's not how we did it in school"!
  4. by   Kitiger
    Here's a whole boatload of advice.

    Advice For The New Nurse Entering Med-Surg
  5. by   WittySarcasm
    If you're able to always help your CNA/tech, never state 'that's the tech's job'. If you have time in your med pass/assessment then help them to the bathroom or to bed. You'll make so many friends. Plus you'll get hands on with your patients (plus noting material and assessment material).

    I find assessments can be done while talking to your patients. I deal with a lot of stroke patients- so talk with them. Ask about their family or their job or how their day was. Even non-strokes can be helpful here, is the patient alert? Are they answering correctly. Is their speech good? Is the eye contact good as you move around the room?

    Always check dressings, even if they're not due on your shift and document what you see- dime sized drainage on dressing and so on.

    If someone has a patient or a treatment or a care you've never seen before ask to watch. That was how I learned the most, because then I knew what it looked like.

    Also never be afraid to ask questions. And never be afraid to call the doctor or rapid response. I've called doctors just because the patient didn't seem right. There was no signs, and most times they say to watch them, but ALERT the doctor that something is up.
  6. by   tonyl1234
    Quote from WittySarcasm
    If you're able to always help your CNA/tech, never state 'that's the tech's job'. If you have time in your med pass/assessment then help them to the bathroom or to bed. You'll make so many friends. Plus you'll get hands on with your patients (plus noting material and assessment material).
    And trust us.

    To add to what I quoted, because of the different job responsibilities between an aide and a nurse, at a lot of jobs, your aides are more in direct contact with the patient than you are. If we think something is wrong, don't just brush it off as "Its his medicine," get in that room and see what we see. Any idiot can learn assessment skills, us aides are no different. If we're making it a point to tell you something, even if it's something that's typically normal on most people, take it as being significant, either that the patient improved or that something is wrong. Your aide isn't going to waste their time to go tell you that everything is normal

close