Scared.....No Nursing?

  1. Hello All,

    I have posted on here several times before, but in short, I am a relative new grad. Only a little over a year out of school. I have failed out of two med-surg orientations. I am currently working at a nursing home and it was going fairly well, up until recently, where again, I am being told I'm not good enough/my assessments are not up to par, I'm basically incompetent. I'm scared and angry..... Everywhere I turn, I am being told apparently nursing isn't for me. This is all I have ever wanted to do. So now I have a nursing degree and very little clinical experience to get into anything like informatics or..... So now I'm stuck. I don't really know what else I have an interest in. I don't know where to go next. I really don't want to be stuck at a desk job or sitting in front of a computer all day. I have a nice nest egg (financially) and I still have my job at the nursing home, (so I don't need to make a decision in the next couple of days) but I don't know if I will be staying. Any other suggestions on where I can turn to? I LOVE nursing. It hurts and breaks my heart to even consider walking away, but no matter what I try, I'm told that i can't do the job.
  2. Visit Name9335 profile page

    About Name9335, BSN, RN

    Joined: Aug '17; Posts: 83; Likes: 107

    71 Comments

  3. by   Davey Do
    I appreciate your situation and admire your endeavor to face and deal with your situation, Name.

    Since you say you love nursing so much, and are relatively content on your present position, my vote is to bloom where you're planted. Get better at what you're doing.

    Case in point: In 1986, I wanted to work in surgery as a scrub nurse and in the beginning I was all thumbs. The assistant supervisor told me that perhaps OR wasn't where I should be. I cried and buckled down. Then, after 3 months, it all came together! I became a Wiz Kid. The remainder of my time in working that position has many many good memories.

    It happens. Frogs really can become princes.Or princesses.

    Good luck to you,Name!
  4. by   cleback
    What are your strengths?
  5. by   Name9335
    Quote from cleback
    What are your strengths?
    I wish I really knew. All I have ever been told through this nursing journey so far has been the underlying theme of "I'm incompetent". Really hard to find confidence/strengths in that
  6. by   Name9335
    Quote from Davey Do
    I appreciate your situation and admire your endeavor to face and deal with your situation, Name.

    Since you say you love nursing so much, and are relatively content on your present position, my vote is to bloom where you're planted. Get better at what you're doing.

    Case in point: In 1986, I wanted to work in surgery as a scrub nurse and in the beginning I was all thumbs. The assistant supervisor told me that perhaps OR wasn't where I should be. I cried and buckled down. Then, after 3 months, it all came together! I became a Wiz Kid. The remainder of my time in working that position has many many good memories.

    It happens. Frogs really can become princes.Or princesses.

    Good luck to you,Name!
    Problem is this current place is now essentially telling me I'm incopentent in my assessments. This is a nursing home and apparently our providers have concerns about me. It's been a really rough several weeks, which doesn't help matters. I am getting so burnt out on the hours here, but we are going to be working on that?....
  7. by   cleback
    Quote from Name9335
    I wish I really knew. All I have ever been told through this nursing journey so far has been the underlying theme of "I'm incompetent". Really hard to find confidence/strengths in that
    You don't always need it to be validated by others, though, to count it as a strength. Maybe you've noticed you're really thorough going through paperwork and catch things other nurses don't. Maybe you have a knack for remembering policies. Maybe you can connect with the confused patient, the scared patient, the rough around the edges patient. Maybe the CNAs get sh!t done when you're on (ie good at task assignments, communication, motivating others). Honest to goodness, there is ALWAYS something someone is good at, even if it's not directly related to the job.

    Maybe seek out a career counselor or a regular counselor (if you feel completely defeated/depressed). Best wishes. This too will pass.
  8. by   Name9335
    Quote from cleback
    You don't always need it to be validated by others, though, to count it as a strength. Maybe you've noticed you're really thorough going through paperwork and catch things other nurses don't. Maybe you have a knack for remembering policies. Maybe you can connect with the confused patient, the scared patient, the rough around the edges patient. Maybe the CNAs get sh!t done when you're on (ie good at task assignments, communication, motivating others). Honest to goodness, there is ALWAYS something someone is good at, even if it's not directly related to the job.

    Maybe seek out a career counselor or a regular counselor (if you feel completely defeated/depressed). Best wishes. This too will pass.
    I was told in my meeting today that "I have a really good attention to detail....*♀️" I'm like the med error discovery champion at work. I wish it wasn't so, but it is what it is
  9. by   Daisy4RN
    Sorry you are having a hard time. Agree with DaveyDo that I would stay put and try to make it work where you are. Have they offered any possible solutions, extra training etc. Is it the actual physical assessment or the charting of the assessment, usually it is the paperwork they are concerned about because of payment reimbursement or regulations. I would guess it is the paperwork that is probably the issue, if so ask for extra training, the paperwork, especially admit/discharge is very important but time consuming and can be difficult. If it is the actual physical assessment then maybe review books/you tube etc. I think if you leave before giving it a chance you will regret it later. I would speak to your supervisor and let them know you are going to work on that and see if they can offer any suggestions. You can do this, good luck!!
  10. by   Davey Do
    Quote from Name9335
    Problem is this current place is now essentially telling me I'm incompetent in my assessments.
    Quote from Davey Do
    The assistant supervisor told me that perhaps OR wasn't where I should be. I cried and buckled down. Then, after 3 months, it all came together! I became a Wiz Kid.
    My argument is to work at becoming competent.

    Another case in point.: I was working at a community mental health clinic as an outpatient nurse. My initial responsibilities were to carry a caseload and assist the psychiatrist. More responsibilities were heaped upon me until after being there five years, I was carrying a caseload of well over 100 clients, setting up and managing two medication assistance programs, acting as a mandated follow-up agent for deinstitutionalized state hospital patients, a preadmission screener for the southern half of the county, assisting in the crisis-stabilization unit, giving two hour lectures twice a week for court ordered clients convicted of crimes involving alcohol and drugs, and "other duties as assigned"!

    I was eventually terminated for not being able to fulfill my job responsibilities. I got a really good severance package and contested the termination with the state employment service and won benefits.

    I worked and did the job to the best of my ability. I bloomed where I was planted. I was terminated, but it all came out in the wash and I segued into an administrative position at another community mental health clinic making a lot more money.

    Once again, Name, if you love nursing and are okay with what you're doing, work at it, try to get better at assessments, and let the chips fall where they may.

    You may be surprised at the outcome.

    Again: Good luck!
  11. by   Name9335
    Quote from Daisy4RN
    Sorry you are having a hard time. Agree with DaveyDo that I would stay put and try to make it work where you are. Have they offered any possible solutions, extra training etc. Is it the actual physical assessment or the charting of the assessment, usually it is the paperwork they are concerned about because of payment reimbursement or regulations. I would guess it is the paperwork that is probably the issue, if so ask for extra training, the paperwork, especially admit/discharge is very important but time consuming and can be difficult. If it is the actual physical assessment then maybe review books/you tube etc. I think if you leave before giving it a chance you will regret it later. I would speak to your supervisor and let them know you are going to work on that and see if they can offer any suggestions. You can do this, good luck!!
    Essentially I am calling providers with lab results and haven't done an assessment. In my mind, I'm just calling to give a heads up. I think I would do ok with the actual assessment if I actually slowed down and did one?
  12. by   Name9335
    Quote from Davey Do
    My argument is to work at becoming competent.

    Another case in point.: I was working at a community mental health clinic as an outpatient nurse. My initial responsibilities were to carry a caseload and assist the psychiatrist. More responsibilities were heaped upon me until after being there five years, I was carrying a caseload of well over 100 clients, setting up and managing two medication assistance programs, acting as a mandated follow-up agent for deinstitutionalized state hospital patients, a preadmission screener for the southern half of the county, assisting in the crisis-stabilization unit, giving two hour lectures twice a week for court ordered clients convicted of crimes involving alcohol and drugs, and "other duties as assigned"!

    I was eventually terminated for not being able to fulfill my job responsibilities. I got a really good severance package and contested the termination with the state employment service and won benefits.

    I worked and did the job to the best of my ability. I bloomed where I was planted. I was terminated, but it all came out in the wash and I segued into an administrative position at another community mental health clinic making a lot more money.

    Once again, Name, if you love nursing and are okay with what you're doing, work at it, try to get better at assessments, and let the chips fall where they may.

    You may be surprised at the outcome.

    Again: Good luck!
    Thanks
  13. by   Daisy4RN
    Quote from Name9335
    I was told in my meeting today that "I have a really good attention to detail....������*♀️" I'm like the med error discovery champion at work. I wish it wasn't so, but it is what it is
    This is a very good quality for a RN, now just take that and learn how to apply that to your assessment skills/paperwork. You got this!
  14. by   Name9335
    Quote from Name9335
    Essentially I am calling providers with lab results and haven't done an assessment. In my mind, I'm just calling to give a heads up. I think I would do ok with the actual assessment if I actually slowed down and did one?

    But then some labs we call on to give a heads up and providers aren't asking for a full assessment...

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