Nursing Issues

  1. Hello all, I'm new to allnurses.com
    My name is Lisa and I'm pre-nursing. I'm currently applying to some nursing programs in the NJ/NY area. On one of my apps, I need to respond to what two current issues are that professional nurses face today and why. I know one of them is a shortage in staff, but I can't seem to come up with a second issue. I've looked online but it's really hard to find something with substance, especially when I'm not a nurse yet, and have little experience in a hospital. I feel a bit ignorant and overwhelmed even for asking, but was wondering if some you actual nurses could help.
  2. Visit IheartNJ profile page

    About IheartNJ

    Joined: Nov '06; Posts: 2

    6 Comments

  3. by   Antikigirl
    Oh man, the lastest hot issues are about patient abuse or harrassment, especially with the elderly or mentally challenged pt. Do you except abuse to a certain level, take it all because they are either older or not capable of knowing harrasment? When do you say when and what do you do!

    Not a lot of facilities handle nursing complaints about patients well at all if at all! Say you have a patient that tried to kiss you or does something inappropriate...who do you talk to for actual results? Do facilites actually do something to help? Do you have a right to protest in front of the patient? Lots of issues here...on the edge of a knife blade to protect self vs upsetting a pt? Big topic!!!!!!!!!!

    Also...another topic is computerized charting vs hand writing! Big hot topic!

    Hipaa is another!

    Abreviations too...that one is a big time sticker in our hospital!

    Cultural differences and catering to cultural need.

    Frequent flyers, or patients that come in regularily....

    Denial of treatments by patients...right but is it right?

    Technology taking us away from the patient.

    DNR, are things clear or muddy?

    Peoples perspective on nurses...maid/servent or professional?

    Scubs...whites or color?

    Do nurses have to be responsible for TOO much?

    Nurses eating their young!

    Fair nursing ratios/pay?

    Enjoying work vs burn out?

    LOTS of issues!!!!!!! I think I gave a few great examples, and can elaborate more....
  4. by   IheartNJ
    Thanks TriageRN~!
    That was really helpful~! So much more informative than the articles i've read!

    Can you elaborate more on the issue with computerized charting vs hand writing?
    Why is this such a huge issue? How does it affect nurse-patient relations? Is it because of the time spent on learning the computer that takes you away from patient care? What is your personal opinions and experiences on the issue?

    Also, what are you experiences upon the issue of shortages of nurses. How has a shortage made your job harder? What are some pinpoint examples of how a shortage affects your daily nursing tasks as well as overall nurse professional?

  5. by   vrhodes
    I have just finished my final unit in nursing, and it was called 'Professional issues in nursing.' Some of out topis were

    Horizontal violence in the clinical setting

    Recruitment and retention of nurses

    Evidencce based practice- a help or hindrance

    The effects of whistleblowing on the whistleblower

    Role of a nurse practitioner

    They are all relevant topics in nursing at the moment.
  6. by   All_Smiles_RN
    In regards to paper charting, there is a transition. At my particular facility, it has been going on for over a year now. During the transition, we have to chart both on paper and in the computer. Also, the doctors have to be trained to use the computers. Alot of them can't be bothered... they come to us and have us look up the info for them.

    On the flip side, it's nice to have access to all the info that you need in the computer. You can see a summary of the labs and see trends without having to flip through page after page. And typed consultations from the doctors... so much nicer than deciphering their handwriting!
  7. by   West_Coast_Ken
    Quote from jenniferhelene
    Also, the doctors have to be trained to use the computers. Alot of them can't be bothered... they come to us and have us look up the info for them.
    I'd probably do this a time or two, depending on circumstances, but if a doc thinks I am his go-fer well he/she is sorely mistaken and I'd make it [professionally] clear I am not looking up HIS work (any more than he/she is going to look up my stuff.) gimme a break
  8. by   ERNP
    Quote from IheartNJ
    Thanks TriageRN~!
    That was really helpful~! So much more informative than the articles i've read!

    Can you elaborate more on the issue with computerized charting vs hand writing?
    Why is this such a huge issue? How does it affect nurse-patient relations? Is it because of the time spent on learning the computer that takes you away from patient care? What is your personal opinions and experiences on the issue?

    Also, what are you experiences upon the issue of shortages of nurses. How has a shortage made your job harder? What are some pinpoint examples of how a shortage affects your daily nursing tasks as well as overall nurse professional?
    I am not triageRN, but have been interested in this issue. From my perspective, the term nursing shortage may be somewhat of a misnomer. There are more nurses than are working at the bedside currently. What interests me most are the reasons why nurses aren't working at the bedside. When I think about it, most of it comes down to employer perspective on the role of the nurse as a replaceable commodity to be obtained for the least cost. As such, the role of nursing satisfaction with the role has only recently become of interest. It seems when no one will work in an environment, the interest in how to recruit and retain them becomes a greater priority.

    Of course employers aren't the only ones who contribute to this perspective.... when was the last time you had an xray read and the radiologist charge for reading said xray was bundled with the service. Doesn't happen, you get a bill from whoever did the xray and another bill from the radiologist for reading the xray. Ditto with most, if not all, medical services. At the same time, the nurse that assessed the patient prior to CT guided biopsy, started the IV, administered the sedation, recovered the patient... all those are bundled with the service when perhaps they should be billed seperately to adequately demonstrate the value of the nurse and result in an appropriate working wage. Tell that to your insurer, they won't likely give you a standing ovation.

    If you are a student, you should have access to the CINAHL database. There are many articles in peer reviewed journals that refer to this topic and the others that have been listed in this thread.

    From a former student, pick 2 related topics, such as the nursing shortage and recruitment and retention. It makes life easier as a student and many of the same sources will be useful for both topics. These are just sample topics, you could choose any 2 topics, but keeping them related will be helpful to you in the long run for this and future assignments.

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