FNP too soon?

Updated | Posted
by Guest1030824 Guest1030824 (Member)

nurse-fnp-program-work.jpg.825d3af7b0cf32ebff64c4b161da70e5.jpg

Hi, I've worked as an RN since 2011 in various areas such as triage, sub-acute, and acute care. I don't necessarily have 11 years of consecutive experience, but condensed, I have 5-6 years of solid nursing experience. Anyway, I'm in the FNP program right now, and I have been off the floor since 2020. I'm considering going back to the bedside but I will be in labs/clinical Summer of 2023. Should I just focus on program without working or better to work? I don't want to apply to a hospital job and then go "BTW, I'm leaving" within a year. Anyone else in same situation?

sleepwalker

sleepwalker, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occupational Health. Has 18 years experience. 331 Posts

Why can't you work full-time and do your FNP program part-time? I did and I know others on this site have as well...it's doable with effort and time management. 

Plus...I go to use my employer's tuition reimbursement to pay for my FNP program. 

DYS NP

Has 6 years experience. 93 Posts

I think it depends on what you can afford and how quickly you want to finish your degree. I worked as a nurse part-time in my field during the nonclinical portion of my program, got some tuition reimbursement, then left my nursing job to gun through PNP clinicals. I'm older and didn't want to take 6 years to graduate, so I did it full time. I could afford not to work for that last year, but a lot of people aren't in that position. I did miss that 2k/semester of tuition from my RN employer. On the other hand, my NP salary started at 33% more than my RN salary, so it was the right choice for me. Working part-time in a networked hospital system could help you line up clinicals though, if your program requires you to find them yourself, and you'd probably have preference as an existing employee if NP positions open up at your RN site once you graduate. Lots of variables to consider, you just have to figure out what'll work best for you.

Guest1030824

Guest1030824

169 Posts

Thank you 

On 3/27/2022 at 1:30 PM, DYS NP said:

I think it depends on what you can afford and how quickly you want to finish your degree. I worked as a nurse part-time in my field during the nonclinical portion of my program, got some tuition reimbursement, then left my nursing job to gun through PNP clinicals. I'm older and didn't want to take 6 years to graduate, so I did it full time. I could afford not to work for that last year, but a lot of people aren't in that position. I did miss that 2k/semester of tuition from my RN employer. On the other hand, my NP salary started at 33% more than my RN salary, so it was the right choice for me. Working part-time in a networked hospital system could help you line up clinicals though, if your program requires you to find them yourself, and you'd probably have preference as an existing employee if NP positions open up at your RN site once you graduate. Lots of variables to consider, you just have to figure out what'll work best for you.

Thank you for your advice! I think I will work full time to get my experience and then switch it up to either part time or PRN to get FNP done faster. 🙂

ELVIE

ELVIE

Specializes in FNP. Has 30 years experience. 1 Post

I work full time and did GI calls while on my FNP and clinical once a week. You do not have to quit your current job. Self-discipline and time management are very important.

Alicia777

Alicia777, MSN, NP

Specializes in Surgery. 317 Posts

Agree with PP, this is not CRNA school and you can definitely at least work part-time and go to school...