Jump to content

Epidural Education

Ob/Gyn   (3,328 Views 8 Comments)
by tammki5g tammki5g (New Member) New Member

tammki5g has 12 years experience and works as a Director.

1,478 Visitors; 21 Posts

advertisement

Hi Just wondering what the practice is in other places. Do the Anesthesiologists educate patients on epidurals prior to placement or are patients give a video to watch as education while in labor or before?

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3,694 Visitors; 76 Posts

I know that when I had an epidural for my son (in2005) here in MA I was told minimal things about the epidural. The large majority of knowledge I gained was from asking a few questions about it when I met the anesthesiologist (right before it was put in.) So to answer your question, no, I was not given a video to watch regarding the anesthesia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pedsrnjc has 1 years experience and works as a Pediatrics.

2,899 Visitors; 69 Posts

Personal experience..."I don't need to know anything about it, I'll go without, just like I did with my first."..."Where is that anesthesiologist...Hurry up, oh God hurry, hurry, I can't...do..this...I...don't...care...what...it...does, JUST GET IT NOW!!!!!"

Nope no education for me, just get the sucker in, 10 minutes later baby in my arms. In hindsight, probably didn't need it; I was just in the "transition" phase of labor. Oh well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

3 Followers; 113,256 Visitors; 13,097 Posts

Yes, the anesthesiologist (usually a resident, sometimes the CRNA) comes in and spends about 5 minutes talking to the pt about the epidural, risks, what to expect, etc.

This is done either immediately prior to placement, or if the pt knows she's going to want one, but isn't quite ready yet, the anesth. will come in anyway and talk to her. I like that better because the mother is usually more receptive to learning and providing informed consent when she's not in the throes of active labor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Elvish is a BSN, DNP, RN, NP and works as a OB, Nursery.

3 Followers; 17 Articles; 65,805 Visitors; 5,259 Posts

I was given something to read, and the CRNA came and talked to me beforehand. I actually did feel well-informed before I got my epidural. (This was not at the hospital where I currently work.)

I don't believe we have education vids about epidurals. Those who take the education class get a little bit of info about them, and the rest I believe is done by anesthesia at the bedside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ducknurse has 9 years experience and works as a Assistant Nurse Manager.

1,985 Visitors; 51 Posts

We request an anesthesia evaluation prior to delivery, like b/t 24-36wks

This gives them time to ask questions in a controlled environment and provide an accurate health history to anesthesia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

210 Visitors; 1 Post

This question was posted in 2010 and here it is 4 years later with the same dilema. I don'tt think that L&D nurses expound on the topic enough to the patients for them to make informed decisions. The general public believes that if you get an epidural you should atomatically expect a headache when that is not entirely true. Studies have shown that headaches from epidurals are not as common as people may think. In fact you would get a headache more readily from dehydration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

3 Followers; 113,256 Visitors; 13,097 Posts

This question was posted in 2010 and here it is 4 years later with the same dilema. I don'tt think that L&D nurses expound on the topic enough to the patients for them to make informed decisions.

I don't think it's the purview of the L&D nurse to provide that education. It is the responsibility of the person providing the epidural. Of course the L&D nurse should be able to provide supplementary education and answer questions, reinforcing the education the anesthesiologist provides (or SHOULD provide). But ultimately, the responsibility for primary education should fall to the anesthesiologist/CRNA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×