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Does anyone have info on insurance?

Nurses   (811 Views 7 Comments)
by SunnyAndrsn SunnyAndrsn (Member) Member

SunnyAndrsn specializes in LTC/Rehab, Med Surg, Home Care.

7,190 Profile Views; 561 Posts

As in, do you carry your own malpractice insurance, if so, where did you purchase it? A specialty company, such as those posted in the nursing magazines? Or did you go through your regular insurance agency? What can I expect to pay?

Also, has anyone ever been asked to work "independently"? I do NOT intend on doing this for this woman, but currently I'm doing peds home care part time, and the mom wants me to leave the agency and work independently. She doesn't want to pay the overhead to the agency. Her reasoning is "I can offer more hours", which I can't take anyway, but that's another issue.

Anyway, I'm looking for a gentle way of turning her down...I would NOT want to work without agency support, especially for this particular family.

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pshs_2000 has 7 years experience and specializes in public health, heme/onc, research.

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http://www.nso.com. It really affordable. You can use the search bar at the top to find other threads on malpractice insurance.

I think it would be okay to tell the mom that for both the child's safety and your safety as well as for tax purposes it would be best if you continued to work through the agency. I worked independently as a live-in aide for about a year and a half. It worked out well because we made a contract. I only communicated important things in emails so I always had a copy. They made sure the right amount of taxes were taken out of my check. So I got a w-2 at the end of year not a 1099. But towards the end, they started complaining about how many hours I wouldn't work (we had already agreed to).

To the admins: do we have a malpractice insurance sticky? If not, can we get one? :-)

Edited by pshs_2000

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Bklyn_RN has 13 years experience and specializes in Medsurg, Homecare, Infusion, Psych/Detox.

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Get NSO, I have it and so do 99% of the nurses I work with. It covers you up to six million dollars and its just $90 a year. The coverage also includes representation if you have to go to court and much more.

Also, its good you are not going to work independently for her. If you can't make it the agency can find coverage. Its not your responsibility. But when there is no agency to defer to, you open up yourself to numerous liabilities.

Also the agency can possibly take legal recourse against you if it finds out you have taken their client. You do not owe this person any justification, except, thanks but no thanks. She is just trying to save a buck and does not have your best interest at heart.

I know from personal experience that parents of sick children can be very tough customers. They are also prone to irrational reasoning and behaviour. I can only symphatise with them. Its difficult when a child is sick.

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You can just tell the lady no in a polite manner. She will press you but you can say that you don't care to work in that scenario. I can tell you from experience that it is not necessarily a good way to go. When things are fine, they are fine. But when they aren't, they're bad. My client knew that I remained in the employ of one of my agencies, but as far as they were concerned, they "owned" me just because they were paying me better. I couldn't convince them otherwise until I quit.

malpractice insurance can be had from http://www.nso.com or http://www.hpso.com. It is very inexpensive and well worth the expense.

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edmurse77 specializes in ED.

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Insurance is never a bad idea! You will hear some people tell you that if you have it you are more likely to be added to a case as a Defendant instead of as a witness. Even if that is the case what has to be proven is that you niglected to fullfill your duties and a patient was harmed. Think of insurance as a legal retainer any time you need an attorney for professional reasons you won't have to shell out the cash!

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DebanamRN has 10 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Hospice, ER.

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NSO definately. Small price to pay for peace of mind.

As far as this woman goes, you may have to ask the agency to move you and tell them why. You don't owe this woman an explaination. I understand the challenges facing a famly with a sick child, but I wouldn't want to be at their beck & call. My :twocents:.

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rjflyn has 23 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Emergency.

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NSO as others have said. As it is you may already have and out. If not just say that your contract with your agency has a non-compete clause. Tell the family even if you quit the agency you could not take them as a client for at least a year due such a clause. They don't need to know one may or may not exist.

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