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Does an accelerated program really prepare you?

Students   (599 Views | 3 Replies)

1,650 Profile Views; 35 Posts

Hi everyone! Probably stupid question ahead...

I'm looking into my options at the moment and I'd like some feedback from people who have done ABSN programs. I already have a BA and if possible I'd like to avoid doing a full 4 year BSN for obvious reasons! I found a couple of 2 year programs (which assume you've already completed the first 2 years of Gen Ed stuff).

But I also have some concerns about doing an ABSN - is a 12-16 month program comparable to the 2-4 year programs? Do you get the same amount of information, clinicals, etc? Or is it just too much cramming it all in?

Those who've done ABSN programs did you feel it fully prepared you to enter the nursing profession?

Thanks!

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adventure_rn is a BSN and specializes in NICU, PICU.

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You get the same number of hours in class and in clinical as a traditional program (all programs must meet state requirements for the minimum clinical hours students need in order to sit for NCLEX). I did an ABSN, and the main drawback for me was that the course load was so heavy that I didn't have time to get a PRN CNA job, which I think would have been very helpful (both to gain clinical skills and to find my first job). I had friends who started the program as CNAs and continued to work through the program; I simply didn't have time to job hunt, interview, orient, and work during school. Just as an FYI, ABSN programs are intense because you take so many credits per semester, so be prepared to eat sleep and breathe nursing.

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NICU Guy has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

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You get the same number of hours in class and in clinical as a traditional program (all programs must meet state requirements for the minimum clinical hours students need in order to sit for NCLEX). I did an ABSN, and the main drawback for me was that the course load was so heavy that I didn't have time to get a PRN CNA job, which I think would have been very helpful (both to gain clinical skills and to find my first job). I had friends who started the program as CNAs and continued to work through the program; I simply didn't have time to job hunt, interview, orient, and work during school. Just as an FYI, ABSN programs are intense because you take so many credits per semester, so be prepared to eat sleep and breathe nursing.

^^THIS^^

I felt my education was better than a traditional BSN program. All of my cohort were serious about their education and pulled their own weight on the dreaded group projects. Since all of us had previous degrees, the class discussions were far more interesting because each person brought experience in their previous field (psychology, athletic training, neurobiology, personal training) to give perspective that you wouldn't have in a class of 20yr olds. Because the program was intense, it caused the cohort to band together in shared stress and anxiety (we called ourselves a family, a dysfunctional family, but still a family). The good thing about compressed semesters is that you have a test every week so you have little time to forget information for a test.

If I had to do it over, I would choose ABSN again.

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35 Posts; 1,650 Profile Views

Thank you both for the replies, much appreciated! I definitely anticipate it being stressful and intense, I feel alright (slightly scared) about that aspect but I do think ABSN would fit my needs better. So as long as they're equal in clinical/class hours then that's great!

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