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Doctors?

Nurses   (1,748 Views 5 Comments)
by glovedgoddess glovedgoddess (Member) Member

2,795 Profile Views; 54 Posts

Hi there, this sounds silly to me too but I can honestly say I have never been taught about this..

Who are the doctors in a hosptial? Are the doctors that work in the hospital, only hospital doctors? Or do family doctors work in the hospital and in their offices? I am wondering this because in the computer it should say who the pt's family doctor is, but who is the doctor that is going to look after them during their stay in the hospital? When you need an order are you calling their family doctor who may also work in the hospital? If it's not the family doctor, than how is it decided who will be their doctor in the hospital? Are all doctors in hospitals specialists? And what the heck is a hospitalist?

Sorry that my questions are so all over the place, it seems to be a refleciton of my brain these days!:uhoh3:

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EmergencyNrse has 17 years experience and specializes in Emergency Medicine.

632 Posts; 6,908 Profile Views

There once was a time where doctors took complete and total care of their patients.

They would handle your yearly physicals, cared for you when you had a cold, fixed boo-boos. On the rare occasion you became sick or injured enough to go to the hospital they would care for you there as well.

Your doctor would admit you, write your orders and do rounds until your discharge.

This almost never happens anymore...

Health care plans now control who your doctor is, how and when you are seen, your entitlement under your plan. Most importantly they control reimbursement. Now, if your doctor doesn't see 60 patients in a day at the office he basically starves to death. No time to go to the hospital and do rounds hey have to rely on other doctors.

The hospital is broken up by specialty these days. If you become sick or injured your PMD usually sends you to the ER to be seen by the ER doctor first. Depending on condition you are passed on to a hospitalist or intensivist. There you are consulted out to additional specialties like Cardiology, Neuro, GI/GI, Ortho, virtually and endless lineup of other doctors. That's the simple explanation. Should you end up at a teaching hospital there are additional legions of residents, interns, and mid-level providers.

Hope this helps...

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merlee has 36 years experience.

1,246 Posts; 13,412 Profile Views

Every pt should have a doc assigned as the admitting doctor, and that is the person who writes the orders. More and more hospitals are using hospitalists that have very limited if any office hours. More GPs/internists/fam.practice docs have all office hours and rarely go to the hospitals.

If there is good communication and electronic charting, then everyone can know everything!

Obviously, you need to ask at your facility exactly how everything is arranged.

Best wishes!

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FLArn has 20 years experience and specializes in Hospice, LTC, Rehab, Home Health.

503 Posts; 10,694 Profile Views

Deleted by author. Others posting the same time as I gave much clearer answers.

Edited by FLArn
others gave better responses

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Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

19 Posts; 1,606 Profile Views

A hospitalist is a doctor that is usually a internal medicine doctor, that just prefers to work in hospital instead of a clinic. They have specialized training and experience in hospitalized patients. Otherwise, they are just like any other doctor. They just don't usually practice outside of a hospital like other doctors.

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