DNP?

Published

Anyone planning to venture onward towards the DNP?

Entering my last year of FMHNP program, and think I may just keep on going!

I'm just putting the feelers out right now. Yale would be my dream program! But there are so many others to consider.

My GPA is currently a 3.9, as was my BSN.

But I wonder what else will be considered?

Looking at the current class going through (Yale), it seems like a very diverse and vibrant group. I think community service will be key.

What are some of your experiences? Recommendations? Thoughts?

TYVM

Jules A, MSN

8,863 Posts

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

If you want to spend a ton of money for a fancy pedigree that may or may not make any difference what so ever in your opportunities or income depending on your desired career path I'd say go for it. Not trying to be even remotely snarky just suggesting consideration for the actual costs vs benefits. Best wishes with whatever you decide.

BostonFNP, APRN

3 Articles; 5,581 Posts

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 12 years experience.
Anyone planning to venture onward towards the DNP?

Entering my last year of FMHNP program, and think I may just keep on going!

I'm just putting the feelers out right now. Yale would be my dream program! But there are so many others to consider.

My GPA is currently a 3.9, as was my BSN.

But I wonder what else will be considered?

Looking at the current class going through (Yale), it seems like a very diverse and vibrant group. I think community service will be key.

What are some of your experiences? Recommendations? Thoughts?

TYVM

Yale has a wonderful program, and if you have enjoyed your experience there thus far then it seems like a good place for you. The Yale program is most certainly not a "fluff" doctorate.

More education is never a bad thing. That being said, I always recommend that students wait at least two years before going back for their PhD/DNP after an MSN-NP program, here's why:

1. Role transition: The role transition from student NP to practicing NP is a significant one. The first year or more of practice creates a foundation for your future. You will learn as much or more in your first year of practice as you did in your whole education. That takes time and devotion. Trying to work on a doctorate while you are already trying to learn a new role is at best not efficient and at worse jeopardizing your foundation of practice.

2. Practice experience and perspective: The more experience and subsequent perspective you have from clinical practice the more you will "get" from your doctorate program. It gives you a change to see what it is like to practice, find your niche, and being to develop ideas for your doctorate work.

3. Cost: Most doctorate programs can be partially or fully funded via precepting NP students. Once you have established yourself in practice for the first year or two, becoming a preceptor is the next logical step in your career development. Most schools award preceptors credits than can be used for doctoral education. Additionally, after some practice experience, you may also get involved in guest lecturing and additionally funding your doctoral program.

4. Buffering: Right now school is what you know and naturally you want to continue it. AFter a bit of time out of school you may very well decide that you have other plans for your time.

Best of luck.

WKShadowNP, DNP, APRN

1 Article; 2,077 Posts

Specializes in Hospital medicine; NP precepting; staff education. Has 22 years experience.

3. Cost: Most doctorate programs can be partially or fully funded via precepting NP students. Once you have established yourself in practice for the first year or two, becoming a preceptor is the next logical step in your career development. Most schools award preceptors credits than can be used for doctoral education. Additionally, after some practice experience, you may also get involved in guest lecturing and additionally funding your doctoral program.

Very good advice, Boston. The quoted point raises questions for me. I don't know anything about being paid to precept. Can you tell me more?

BostonFNP, APRN

3 Articles; 5,581 Posts

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 12 years experience.
Very good advice, Boston. The quoted point raises questions for me. I don't know anything about being paid to precept. Can you tell me more?

Most schools don't pay their preceptors in cash (though there are ones that do pay cash), rather they provide a certificate/voucher that can be redeemed for credit-hours for those wishing to pursue a doctorate. For example, 1 student = voucher for 1 free credit in the DNP program.