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Direct Entry Programs (Pre-Speciality)

NP Students   (3,767 Views | 9 Replies)

1,697 Profile Views; 40 Posts

I am looking for NP programs that are set up the way that Vanderbilt's pre-speciality program. I have a BS in another discipline and I am working on a masters in public health but I have no nursing degree (LPN, RN, BSN). Also, I do not think I can get funding for another undergraduate degree? The only program that I have found so far is Vanderbilt's, but I have heard Vandy is so expensive and I am not sure my GPA is high enough. I have heard you need close to a 4.0? Any information would be greatly appreciated. I have found some list of "direct entry" programs but I have researched them and they are not accurate.

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18 Posts; 1,353 Profile Views

I'm adding this after the fact: if I am wrong, I offer my apology. But this is the best I know.... OK, now to my reply post...

I see no one has posted a reply (I just hate it when that happens), so I'll wade in. I don't know of any NP program that will accept anyone who isn't an RN in good standing with two years experience. They may be out there, but I would wonder is this doable? Becoming a nurse and an NP and getting an MSN, all in one swoop? I cannot imagine being able to accomplish what you would need to pass boards let alone be really good at your job, in one program, unless it took about six years, in which case there are better and less expensive options.

I went back after a bachelor's and a master's and picked up an associate's in nursing. After a few years, I entered a master's program which did not require the BSN but did require a bachelor's in something. I think my master's was superfluous, as far as acceptance was concerned. My course was interrupted by family illness, which really wore me out emotionally and physically, and my next step was to take a few steps back and earn a BSN like a running start. I figured, if I can do the BSN, I can get back into the MSN somewhere. So far so good.

There is money for a second bachelor's, or you can take an alternate route, earn your LPN (or LVN, depending on the state you are in) and "bridge" to an RN and a BSN and then do an MSN. The advantage is, you can work as soon as you get the LVN/LPN.

I hope this is helpful. I guess the thing I'd like to add is this. People do not realize that nursing is a complete profession unto itself. We have a descrete body of literature and research, we have bonafide theories of various level of abstraction or concreteness, and you can't just take a couple of courses and get that. While I have found nursing education to be overpopulated with instructors who have little insight and big personality disorders (not all of them, just enough to make the experience potentially damaging to your soul), it is the only way to be a nurse. There is no short fast way to get from batting to home without rounding the bases.

I wish I could be more encouraging. I am always eager and in a hurry to meet my goals too. But there is no fast way to do this.

All this said, if you can get into Vanderbilt and they have this kind of program, go for it. And keep us posted!

Good luck--

Christine

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40 Posts; 1,697 Profile Views

Thank you for answering this is helpful!

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 106,328 Profile Views

There are lots of direct entry programs out there, that take people with a BA/BS in another area but no nursing background, that offer various nurse practitioner concentrations (like Vandy's program). They usually consist of (essentially) an accelerated BSN program and MSN program mashed together, and are usually 2-3 years in length; you start out with no nursing background or experience, and graduate as an advanced practice nurse (prepared to take the boards to become one, that is). It's not clear to me what you mean when you say you researched a list of direct entry programs and found they were "not accurate." Not accurate how??

AFAIK, most of these programs are pretty competitive and you would have to have a strong academic history (high GPA) to be considered a competitive applicant, but the cost of the programs varies a lot, depending on whether you are talking about a state or private school.

Best wishes for your journey!

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mzaur specializes in Mental Health.

377 Posts; 13,183 Profile Views

I'm currently in Vanderbilt's pre-specialty program. I also applied to Boston College, Yale, Seattle University, and MGH. I got into all of them but chose Vanderbilt because I wanted to be somewhere warm. Yes, they are competitive, but it's doable. I also did not have a super high GPA. I think my cumulative was 3.3 but last two years was 3.7. I also had a high GRE and two years of volunteer experience in a community clinic with good letters of rec. So GPA isn't everything. These schools really look at the total package.

There's also U Penn, UCSF, and a few other programs. Do a search for direct entry and you'll find more. But yeah these programs tend to be expensive. Vandy and BC are the only ones that are super accelerated so you get done in 2 years, while the rest are 3 years, so think about how motivated you are to finish. Vandy is straight through the summers, but we do get a few weeks off in summer and winter, and a week for thanksgiving, so it's not that bad. The cost is worth it for me since I'll be done quickly and have good job prospects since I'm going into psych. You can PM me if you have any questions

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 106,328 Profile Views

Here is the list. Master list of Direct Entry Nursing Programs: - College Confidential. I contact several of these schools and found it not to be accurate. Thank you so much for your reply.

Ahh. The College Confidential website is an independent, for-profit website. They have no particular incentive to be careful or accurate with their reporting. Here is the AACN (American Assoc. of Colleges of Nursing) list; you might have better luck with this list:

http://www.aacn.nche.edu/leading-initiatives/research-data/GENMAS.pdf

Of course, schools do change their offerings from time to time, so no list is likely to be 100% accurate (by the time the list is compiled, some schools are likely to have added or subtracted a program). Unless you're prepared to move anywhere in the US to attend school, though, I would concentrate on researching programs near where you live or in areas to which you are willing to relocate.

Best wishes!

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txnurstud has 17 years experience.

126 Posts; 7,725 Profile Views

This is great information but if you are still need a list...I have attached a list that I compiled about 3 years ago that I have used to narrow my search down. My number 1 choice is Vanderbilt, I am just waiting on my last child to graduate from HS.

Direct Entry MSN Programs.pdf

Edited by txnurstud
edit the paragraph

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