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Direct Entry MSN vs Nurse Practioner MSN

Posted

So I'm applying to schools for 2016 summer / fall entry - I'm a little confused with one aspect.

Most schools that have a masters in nursing for non nurses (entry) seem to work in the way that you earn a bachelors then proceed to the masters nurse practitioner program. I'm definitely looking to go the NP route as a career (psychiatry).

Hopkins seems to have a masters in nursing program but it doesn't look like it's a NP program from what I can tell. On their site it does say you can continue your studies for an advanced degree, but do you have to reapply for the NP portion if you go that route? And do you need to work as a nurse before that application?

I'm looking at schools in the Northeast for the most part, right now I'm planning on applying to Yale, Columbia, Rochester and UPenn - hopkins is up in the air depending on how that program works.

Thanks!

mzaur

Specializes in Mental Health.

Don't forget about Boston College. BC and Vanderbilt are the only direct entry PMHNP programs that are 2 years. All the others are 3 years. I got into Vandy, BC, Yale, MGH, and a few others. I wanted to stay in the northeast too (originally from NJ) but I picked Vanderbilt because I got tired of cold winters. Great program. I'm halfway done now. You can PM me if you want to talk more

Hey, I've been trying to wrap my brain around the same issue and I think the issue is that not all direct entry masters prepare you to be a NP. With the changes in the required standard for nursing education, many schools have direct entry programs that don't prepare you to think like an NP but more like a clinical nurse leader/specialist. . . the programs are easier to complie, take less time for students to complete and still abide by the new requirements. For example, positions like nurse educator and CRNA are specialized positions that require similar course work but don't require one to have a broad scope in terms of clinical hours and populations cared for. This is great because not everyone wants to be an NP but if you would want to eventually sit for NP boards you'd need to get a certificate of advance study or a DNP in the field you'd want the NP degree in. For example, Columbia just changed their direct entry BSN/MSN program to a MSN/DNP or PhD program. This now ensures one would have the highest level of education expected to date, and not have to reapply for the hire degree. At Hopkins it looks like you'd have to apply for advance study before sitting for NP boards.

With that said, programs where you specialize for your MSN degree ( you'll study in-depth on a subject or population; women's health, family, adult-gerontology, pediatrics, etc) will still prepare you and allow you to sit for NP boards after graduation. The issue is more so that when looking for a job what will employers want? But I have known people to do either path and still land jobs in similar positions.

If anything I stated is wrong, correct me :) This is everything I figured out from my research other the past few months. Also if I need to elaborate on anything, just ask. Hope this helps!

... many schools have direct entry programs that don't prepare you to think like an NP but more like a clinical nurse leader/specialist. . .

(Please don't conflate clinical nurse leaders and clinical nurse specialists. They are entirely different roles and educational programs.)

mzaur

Specializes in Mental Health.

Hey, I've been trying to wrap my brain around the same issue and I think the issue is that not all direct entry masters prepare you to be a NP. With the changes in the required standard for nursing education, many schools have direct entry programs that don't prepare you to think like an NP but more like a clinical nurse leader/specialist. . . the programs are easier to complie, take less time for students to complete and still abide by the new requirements. For example, positions like nurse educator and CRNA are specialized positions that require similar course work but don't require one to have a broad scope in terms of clinical hours and populations cared for. This is great because not everyone wants to be an NP but if you would want to eventually sit for NP boards you'd need to get a certificate of advance study or a DNP in the field you'd want the NP degree in. For example, Columbia just changed their direct entry BSN/MSN program to a MSN/DNP or PhD program. This now ensures one would have the highest level of education expected to date, and not have to reapply for the hire degree. At Hopkins it looks like you'd have to apply for advance study before sitting for NP boards.

With that said, programs where you specialize for your MSN degree ( you'll study in-depth on a subject or population; women's health, family, adult-gerontology, pediatrics, etc) will still prepare you and allow you to sit for NP boards after graduation. The issue is more so that when looking for a job what will employers want? But I have known people to do either path and still land jobs in similar positions.

If anything I stated is wrong, correct me :) This is everything I figured out from my research other the past few months. Also if I need to elaborate on anything, just ask. Hope this helps!

DNP is not and will not be required for NP licensure. It's only a recommendation made by nursing schools deans and faculty (hmm I wonder why)

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 9 years experience.

Here the DNP is going to be a requirement for CRNA soon.

Hi! I was wondering if you could tell me more about the PMHNP program at Vanderbilt and how you like it. I'm new on here and can't figure out how to PM you...