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what are the differences between...

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ADN BSN CNA, IN terms of mobility within the USA? Anyone with experience traveling Internationally?

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

RNs probably have the easiest inter-state mobility because of the consistency of state BON regulation & NPAs. It's even easier if you're moving from one compact state to another. We're close to launching an APRN compact also. LP/VN are less mobile because there is a much wider variation in scope of practice. CNAs (bless 'em) can have a pretty difficult time because they are regulated by a hodge-podge of different agencies. For instance, in my state - CNAs are regulated by Dept of Aging & Disability Services, not our BON.

I'm from New Jersey and going to take CNA classes so that I can get my foot in the door with a hospital or rehab...hopefully...

Want to become a nurse, I currently work in manufacturing, I have a BA in psychology, but realized I can do more with my life...want to be a CNA to get the "F..." Out of manufacturing

NICU_Nightingale, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience.

Pete M you should just to an accelerated BSN program rather than CNA.

I'm going to do that as well...problem is I want to do it one step at a time and unfortunately I will need to work to support myself. Even with financial aid an accelerated BSN still needs to cover the rest of the $35k needed. Being in manufacturing is physically draining, I want to get out as soon as possible, if CNA program is only 1 month, I'd rather do it. It's only 90 hours or so at the local college here.

NICU_Nightingale, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience.

Well in my state- after your first semester of nursing school you are a CNA, you just have to take the test. You seem to have it figured out though, good luck!

Nonyvole, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency.

But yes, a RN is a RN, and it's up to the facilities to set the rules as to who they'll hire as to ADN- or BSN-prepared nurses.

Plus, there's always going for your ADN, getting a job, and then going into a RN-to-BSN program if obtaining your BSN is what you desire.

I heard they are phasing ADN out by 2020???

Nonyvole, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency.

I heard they are phasing ADN out by 2020???

I'm sure that those recommendations can be made, but even the Institute of Medicine, who made the suggestion, says that it isn't feasible for a variety of reasons.

Personally, I forsee this sort of thing coming from the hospitals and them choosing BSN-prepared nurses over ADN-prepared nurses for new jobs, as well as pushing all their current nursing staff to obtain at least a BSN, but there will still be places for ADN-prepared nurses in all fields of nursing. (At least, I certainly hope so, but that's very much my opinion). A nurse is a nurse is a nurse.