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CONCERNED & Nervous about how RUSHED program is

First Year   (710 Views 2 Comments)

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Hello,

Not sure if this is the right place to post this but just wondering what the first year will be like..

I completed a LVN program in 2014 where I (personally) feel I made the mistake of accepting a job in plastic surgery after a short time in home health where I actually just did care giving work.  Two years went by and I realized that if I got a job at a SNF I would be screwed because I felt like all the clinically significant information I had studied (Tactility) was kind of lost. Similar to the “use it or lose it” saying. So then I decided the way to fulfill my dream of working in a hospital was to get my RN.. I remembered how much I loved Med Surg in my clinical and knew that I needed to get my RN to be able to work on such a floor. 
fast forward to now, and I am one year away from graduating my BSN program. I am just concerned because I am realizing that a lot of what fuels my ability to understand what I am learning is depending what I learned in my VN program.  If i didnt have that knowledge to support me I cannot imagine how I would keep my head above water in this school. 

the BSN program I am in provides (1) 12 hour clinical day a week, whereas my VN program provided (3) 8 hour clinical days a week. We have one day of class a week which is 5 hours long where we are lectured on a ton of information and are tested the next week.

after this term I won’t have a clinical that allows for hands on training similar to what we are in now which is intermediate med surg until my Advanced Med Surg which isnt for 9 months.

I am just wondering if anyone else out there feels like their school is rushing the heck out of this degree? I haven’t practiced as a VN in two years because the program became so demanding and my only previous experience has been the plastic surgery. I do continuing education courses, keep up my BLS and got certified in some skills to keep some knowledge of things but I cannot see myself being able to manage patient care on my own in a year. am i thinking to far ahead? 

does anyone have any recommendations as to how to better retain this information and not just lose it the second a quiz is over? How do I hold on to this information without adequate clinical hours and such a high information load? I love nursing so much I want to be a competent nurse more than anything! How did you all (If you felt this way) find the courage to get into your first nursing job while feeling so unprepared? I’m passing tests averaging in high 80’s and getting good feedback from clinical professors but will this be enough? Are there extension programs out there or can anyone explain how new grad programs work exactly? Finding mixed explanations about that too. Sorry for so many questions I would greatly appreciate any feedback 🙄

 

Edited by DaniVntoBsn

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269 Posts; 4,031 Profile Views

So I'm in a very fast BSN program.  I too feel that I need more clinical time.  I get plenty of "book" time for sure, but I feel like that is where the difference is.  I don't have enough personal experience to say, but I think a 2 year prepared nurse probably comes out of school with more clinical experience than a BSN prepared nurse, but the BSN nurse most likely has more developed clinical thinking skills.  I say this because of people that I know in 2 year programs.  Their ability to perform in clinicals is great, but they don't have as in depth of an understanding of how body systems work together like I do.  Seriously - all just a guess from a person who has no business guessing about this stuff... .  But you are not alone - I'd do clinicals all winter break if someone would let me.

My 4th semester is "easy" compared to everything else.  I will have 2 online courses, med surg and my preceptorship.  This gives me time to get a job as a nurse intern and get more clinical skills experience before I get to the nclex.  My friend is in a program where this would not be possible for her because her 4th semester is her hardest.  

As far as new grad programs - there are a lot of them and they are all different.  Look at hospitals near you and see how theirs work.  There is usually a spot on their website that explains them pretty well.  We have a hospital close by here that does a 16 week intensive training in your "specialty" and then they put you with your preceptor for another period of time.  It takes at least 8 months for you to get to the point where you are really on your own.

Don't be afraid - you are in a good position because you are aware of what you don't know.  Its the ones who think they know everything that are dangerous.

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398 Posts; 1,153 Profile Views

You will not retain, and do not need to retain everything you are tested on.  You should learn soooo much in nursing school, and, as you can tell from all of the new grads posting on this site, the learning continues BIG TIME as you work as a novice nurse.  We tend to become very knowledgeable about the area in which we work, and forget some/most of the things we learned about other specialties.  For instance, I know pretty much nothing about NICU or L & D because my only exposure was in clinicals in nursing school.

I wonder if you're emphasizing hands-on experience (which, yes is SUPER important) because of your LVN history, when the education of RNs also includes coordination of care, critical thinking, leadership, etc.  (and yes, I know some LVNs have great leadership skills...I'm just generalizing here)

I honestly think you're most likely thinking too far ahead and over thinking it.  If you're scoring well on written exams and passing clinicals (and you have that invaluable background as an LVN!), you're fine!

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On 12/4/2019 at 7:53 PM, bitter_betsy said:

**Don't be afraid - you are in a good position because you are aware of what you don't know.  Its the ones who think they know everything that are dangerous.

Hello!! Thank you for your response and  your insight! You provide a refreshing perspective of the subject and it is always good to think positive! I also better understand the new grad program process and will look up surrounding hospitals and their programs! Thanks a bunch!

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3 Posts; 98 Profile Views

8 hours ago, Golden_RN said:

**I wonder if you're emphasizing hands-on experience (which, yes is SUPER important) because of your LVN history, when the education of RNs also includes coordination of care, critical thinking, leadership, etc.  (and yes, I know some LVNs have great leadership skills...I'm just generalizing here)

 

Hello! I'm excited to have a nurse with your experience offer such insightful feedback! Yes I am concerned about the lack of hands on practice as well as the additional responsibilities RNs are tasked with you mentioned. I agree that I may be thinking too far ahead.  Maybe focusing on the moment, day by day, will enable me to graduate, get the experience, and feel more secure 🙂

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