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Cna to Lvn or straight to Lvn

ryukkid ryukkid (New) New

Hello I know this topic has been cover a lot but I need some help I want to be a rn but need to need a foot in the door first. I was going to go to be a lvn but that would take a year and a half to do I will be doing part time or I can go to be a cna to start which would take less time but is it worth it ?

prncess_A

Specializes in CNA/HHA license, Licensed Phlebotomist.

Go straight to lvn. Cna is a waste of time (my personal opinion) =)

BuckyBadgerRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical. Has 4 years experience.

My ADN program required that all applicants "successfully complete" a CNA course before applying to nursing school, so the CNA portion of your question may be answered for you depending on the policies of the school you are looking at

One of the nurses at my job told me that many facilities (and I'm presuming that means LTC, hospitals, etc.) will not hire someone with a LPN or LVN who hasn't first had floor experience as a CNA.

hello Ryukidd

I am going to start my CNA this week , I dont have any medical background so this will be a first step into nursing world.

After CNA training I am planing to applay to WGU pre-licensure program ,or LVN program in L.A. area (I am not sure yet what to do).

hello Ryukidd

I am going to start my CNA this week , I dont have any medical background so this will be a first step into nursing world.

After CNA training I am planing to applay to WGU pre-licensure program ,or LVN program in L.A. area (I am not sure yet what to do).

Sounds like you are on the right track. I understand others that may say that CNA is a waste of time, but with no medical background? It is a wonderful start! I was a CNA many many years ago, challenged LVN boards, but stepped out of nursing altogether. I then started doing home health and went into a VN program where I graduated last year. Personally, I was thankful for all of my CNA experience as it sure made my clinical rotations easier. I hope that you find your new medical experience as helpful as I did. Best of luck to you!

I would never give up any of my experience from doing caregiving for 9 months which made me want to get my CNA 1...which lead to me working in LTC for 1 year and 4 months which made me want to do more so I got my CNA 2 where I worked in the surgical department of a local hospital for three years. Each experience made me want to do more. I would never give up any of my background as a CNA for anything.

If you are able to get straight into an RN program totally do it but at least work for 6 months as a CNA to get your feet wet. I've noticed that nurses who were CNA's first treat their CNA's better because they understand what they are going through. Then when I got my LPN I didn't demand over and beyond of the CNA's like some nurses do.

i personally wish that every nursing program in the country required nurses to WORK as a CNA first.

however, since that isn't the case, i would say go straight for your LVN. in fact, i would say go straight for your RN, but that isn't what you asked.

i had other degrees/careers before i went to nursing school. i became a CNA because i didn't want to go to college AGAIN and pick the wrong career AGAIN so i thought, "if i can do the "dirty work" of nursing AND enjoy it...then i'll probably like being a nurse." i did enjoy it...and i LOVE being a nurse.

if i knew then what i know now....i would've gone straight to LPN school (that's what they're called here) and then went on to get my RN from there. i'd be making a lot more money right now. instead, i get to give other people advice who don't take it. :lol2:

boogalina, ADN, ASN, BSN, MSN, LPN

Specializes in Acute Rehab, IMCU, ED, med-surg. Has 7 years experience.

Work as a CNA first. You will learn basic bedside nursing, which is important if you want to work in critical care someday (critical care nurses usually perform most or all direct care, with or without a CNA's help). You will also learn to care for patients who may be demented, confused or challenging.

It is possible that a person who tells you being a CNA is a waste of time before becoming a LPN/LVN probably has not personally worked as a CNA - no work is a waste of time if you apply yourself and learn everything you can.

CNAs also have a front-row seat to watch nurses perform their skills, as it is often the CNA who helps position the patient, while the nurse performs a procedure. Good luck in your career journey!

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