CNA, LPN or MA

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by csi4eyes csi4eyes (New) New

I've read blogs advising one should work part-time while in nursing school(second bachelors for non-nurses) in order to increase the likelihood of landing a nursing job after graduation.

Which route do you suggest? CNA, LPN, MA or phlebotomist? I am not certified in either so i would have to take a certification course while taking pre requisites for a semester. Depending on the program, it would take 3 to 12 months prior to beginning the actual nursing program. Has anyone else done this or should i look for a receptionist position in a clinic or hospital ?? Thanks!

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 12 years experience. 1 Article; 13,952 Posts

I've read blogs advising one should work part-time while in nursing school(second bachelors for non-nurses) in order to increase the likelihood of landing a nursing job after graduation.

Which route do you suggest? CNA, LPN, MA or phlebotomist? I am not certified in either so i would have to take a certification course while taking pre requisites for a semester. Depending on the program, it would take 3 to 12 months prior to beginning the actual nursing program. Has anyone else done this or should i look for a receptionist position in a clinic or hospital ?? Thanks!

LPN is a nurse that requires you to graduate from nursing school after completing clinical & theory in all mandated domains (pharmacology, adult med/surg, psychiatric, obstetrics, geriatrics, pediatrics) plus A&P, nursing theory, fundamentals, nutrition and microbiology. Programs are 10-18 months in length. You must then pass the NCLEX-PN before a license may be issued.

The other three are unlicensed assistive personnel.

MA is a task oriented technical program that follows the medical model of care. Programs are 6 months to 2 years in length. Generally they work in outpatient medical offices and are trained in certain task skills plus front office reception and sometimes billing.

Phlebotomy programs generally take 3-6 months and are taught the basics of blood drawing and specimen collection in various clinical settings. Not all phlebotomists can later translate this skill to IVs as its a different technique.

Many states permit nursing students to challenge the CNA test after successful completion of the first semester nursing fundamentals and recommendation of the school. This is taught under the nursing model of care. CNAs can be trained in as little as 6 weeks full time, 6-9 months part time.

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 34 years experience. 1 Article; 39,477 Posts

Moved to the Nursing career forum