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Class action lawwuit in Canada due to waiting lists for treatment

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by ARealMan ARealMan (Member)

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Universal Healthcare? No thanks -

As a footnote on Canada, the average wait for a simple MRI is three months. In Manitoba, the median wait for neurosurgery is 15.2 months. For chemotherapy in Saskatchewan, patients can expect to be in line for 10 weeks. At last report, 10,000 breast cancer patients who waited an average of two months for post-operation radiation treatments have filed a class action lawsuit against Quebec's hospitals.

http://www.capmag.com/article.asp?ID=4157

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Universal Healthcare? No thanks -

As a footnote on Canada, the average wait for a simple MRI is three months. In Manitoba, the median wait for neurosurgery is 15.2 months. For chemotherapy in Saskatchewan, patients can expect to be in line for 10 weeks. At last report, 10,000 breast cancer patients who waited an average of two months for post-operation radiation treatments have filed a class action lawsuit against Quebec's hospitals.

http://www.capmag.com/article.asp?ID=4157

Sorry I can't read these. The links don't work.

My shoulder was injured in an accident. My insurance was PacifiCare. I went to my primary physician who filled out request forms for me to see an orthopedic doctor. It took two weeks for the authorization.

I had to go park and wait at my primary MD office to get the authorization to take to the office of the orthopedic MD. He could see me in a week. He examined and X-rayed me then ordered an MRI. His office filled our authorization forms. The authorization took another two weeks. Then it was another week before I could have the MRI.

Then I waited a couple days as instructed by the MRI technician. The orthopedic office told me I needed another authorization before the doctor could see me regarding the MRI results for an injury that had not yet been treated!

I had been working buy by now was in such pain I couldn't think and also could not move my arm. I held it against my side, elbow flexed. With much pain I could extend my elbow or adduct my arm enough to get it in a sleeve. I could not brush my hair.

I went to my primary doctor who filled out forms for authorization to see the orthopedic doctor and to go on state disability.

After two weeks for authorization and another week the ortho guy injected my shoulder with cortisone and Marcaine.

NO PAIN! Then the Marcaine wore off.

He also ordered physical therapy 3 times a week for four weeks. It was another two weeks for the authorization for four sessions.

I was a good student so learned to do my treatments at home and went once a week for four weeks.

I was almost pain free and had improved ROM.

It only took eleven weeks for treatment to be started after my accident. The ortho guy told me my strength and ROM would now be better if I had started PT right away.

Oh well, at least I can work.

BUT this was the insurance I was paying for every month for many years. Even during the time I was going through this my premiums for that year were more than the company paid for my care.

I think it cost them more for the delaying authorizations than if I had been allowed to go right to the orthopedic MD, have the MRI, and start PT.

I probably would not have had to go on disability and have the taxpayers support me for two months either.

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Sorry I can't read these. The links don't work.

You don't need to apologize - Hmm the(singular) link works fine - Have you ever tried "cut and paste". Don't worry I will make it easy for you-

here --> http://www.capmag.com/article.asp?ID=4157

Before I address what you wrote - when you say "accident" can you be more specific please - i.e., was this "WORK RELATED"?

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It was not work related. I was riding a bicycle on a beach bike path. A man on inline skates was coming down a hill unable to stop. I turned to avoid being hit. My arm caught on a concrete bench while I went into the sand. The man crashed into the bench.

He got up, took off the skates, and asked if I was OK. I said, "Yes"

He said he was OK.

That night I realized it was worse than I thought so went to the doctor the next day.

I think he was probably hurt more than he thought too.

Thank you for the link. I read it from another post.

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Sadly for those invested in this odd knock against the Canadian system, the wait times are largely hype. A 2003 study found that the median wait time for elective surgeries in Canada was a little more than four weeks, while diagnostic tests took about three (with no wait times to speak of for emergency surgeries). By contrast, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development data from 2001 found that 32 percent of American patients waited more than a month for elective surgery, and 5 percent waited more than four months. That, of course, doesn't count the millions of Americans who never seek surgery, or even the basic care necessary for a diagnosis, because they lack health coverage. If you can't see a doctor in the first place, you never have to wait for treatment.

http://www.prospect.org/cs/articles?article=the_health_of_nations

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