DNP-CNM vs. MSN-CNM

  1. I'm currently finishing my pre-requisites to apply for a nursing program and I'm interested in a CNM role.

    Specifically, I'm trying to compare whether It would be worth it to go the DNP route with a CNM track or if it would be more practical going the MSN route and sitting in for AMCB exam. (In terms of: cost, job outlook, type education, responsibilities)

    I currently have a non-nursing BA degree in Psychology.

    Seattle U has an advance practice nursing immersion program for non-nursing applicants to graduate with a DNP.

    Any thoughts or insights?
    •  
  2. Visit April_Mae16 profile page

    About April_Mae16

    Joined: Jan '18; Posts: 1
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    8 Comments

  3. by   nurse_flo_marie
    It really depends on what role you want. As a DNP, you can practice as both a NP or in leadership. With the MSN, you can only practice in a leadership capacity. The DNP would be more time and money, but would make sense if you ever see yourself wanting to work as a NP.

    If you're just interested in the CNM role and financially-cautious, I would go for the MSN and ask if the school has an option to transfer you into the DNP if you later change your mind.

    Good Luck!
  4. by   Oldmahubbard
    Disagree with the above. Very inaccurate.

    Are you interested in delivering babies? You want the MSN, if you can find a nearby and affordable program.

    The DNP role includes the MSN role, but it is for leadership and won't get you a nickel more than the MSN in today's economy.

    If you have no nursing experience, I sincerely hope you understand what you are getting into.

    Not to be a *****, but you already have a non lucrative degree in psychology. Do you have any health related work experience at all?

    You are going to do 3 or more years of graduate work, borrow a bunch of money and make 100k maybe?

    OK, I will shut up.
  5. by   klone
    Quote from nurse_flo_marie
    It really depends on what role you want. As a DNP, you can practice as both a NP or in leadership. With the MSN, you can only practice in a leadership capacity. The DNP would be more time and money, but would make sense if you ever see yourself wanting to work as a NP.
    This is not correct. You can practice as a full scope CNM (which is not the same thing as an NP) with an MSN degree.

    It's all a matter if you want to get a terminal degree or not. A few programs are going towards only offering DNP programs in nurse midwifery, although the AMCB is not requiring it at this time.
  6. by   Oldmahubbard
    I was wrong about that.

    The low pay still applies.

    It seems hard to believe that our APRN profession is rushing towards a required DNP, when half (or more) of our graduates don't make enough money with their MSN to even make their degree worthwhile.
  7. by   klone
    I agree with you that it's not necessarily financially beneficial to get the DNP over the MSN. But some people find satisfaction in that additional degree. I'm still toying with the idea of getting my doctorate, even though it makes no sense, financially. It's not always about the income.

    I disagree that many/most don't make enough to make the graduate education worthwhile. I make darn good money, and am in a role that I would not be in if I didn't have a graduate degree. Same with all the CNMs I personally know.
  8. by   nurse_flo_marie
    Quote from klone
    This is not correct. You can practice as a full scope CNM (which is not the same thing as an NP) with an MSN degree.
    Thanks for clarifying!
  9. by   meconiumhappens
    Yeah first post is incredibly inaccurate. It seems some people think DNP means doctor nurse practitioner, but it's just a Doctor of Nursing Practice. The biggest reason to get it is if you think you may want to be in academia one day. My school does not hire any professors to teach at any level unless they have their DNP.
  10. by   queenanneslace
    "I'm trying to compare whether It would be worth it to go the DNP route with a CNM track or if it would be more practical going the MSN route and sitting in for AMCB exam. (In terms of: cost, job outlook, type education, responsibilities)"

    First, after you complete your program with either a DNP or MSN, you will be eligible to take the AMCB exam.

    Some midwifery programs offer both degrees (MSN and DNP). Many programs are only offering DNP for APRN specialties, and forgoing the MSN altogether.

    Cost: DNP costs more
    Job outlook: for clinical practice - no difference
    Type education: DNP will take longer (approx 3 years vs 2 years full time enrollment)
    Responsibilities: Same in clinical practice DNP vs MSN

    I have friends who completed a DNP because that was the only option in the program they enrolled in. I have others who went back to complete the DNP after becoming a CNM with a Master's degree.

    For me, personally, I do not see the value in completing a DNP. It does not make a difference in my clinical practice, licensing, responsibility, or pay. If I wanted to teach, this would be different, as terminal degrees are usually required for teaching graduate level studies.

close