ICU Interviews do's and oh no she did not's!!

  1. Seeking advice! Interviews do's and oh no she did not's !!! I have two interviews next week, both for ICU positions. If anyone has anything to offer from A-Z it would be grrrreatly appreciated! What were your interviews like? Did your interviewer throw a curve ball? Is there something that you said during the interview and as soon as you got in the car to drive away you asked yourself.....what was I thinking? If so please share. Positions in my area (especially in the ICU) are pretty scarce right now and the ICU is so where I want to be! If I don't get the job I want it to be because someone is a better fit for the job, not because I blew the interview! Thanks!!
  2. Visit lpn2crna1day profile page

    About lpn2crna1day

    Joined: Jun '07; Posts: 36; Likes: 12
    Registered Nurse; from US
    Specialty: 2 year(s) of experience

    25 Comments

  3. by   cardiacRN2006
    I do a lot of interviews. We don't want to hear that you just want to get the ICU experience to become a CRNA.
  4. by   anurseuk
    Do a bit of reading around general ICU issues before your interview, have a look through a critical care journal.
    Be enthusiastic and show that you are willing to work hard and learn. Good luck
  5. by   poodlicious
    My ICU interviews were brief. They wanted to hear about my future goals (even if that means CRNA, NP, etc.). The director of the unit wants to know that you are able to learn and grow there. Most of the unit directors just spoke about what the unit was, what type of patients they get, ratios.. It was just ultimately my decision to pick which ICU I wanted. HR asked the toughies.. What is an example of how you worked toward a goal and what was the outcome? Describe when you have worked as a member of a group? What challenges you? I looked at interview general question websites to prepare. Hope this helps.
  6. by   jbp0529
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    I do a lot of interviews. We don't want to hear that you just want to get the ICU experience to become a CRNA.

    Ditto that. If one of our prospective nurses mentions CRNA during the process, its automatically a big red "X". I'm not personally saying that having CRNA as a goal is good, bad, or indifferent...its just my unit's written/unwritten stance on the matter.
  7. by   lpn2crna1day
    Thanks to everyone for their responses. They were all very helpful. I have completed one of the two interviews. I feel like my nerves got the best of me. I rambled at times and feel like I strayed from the original questions. Hope the next one goes a bit better now that I have a little better idea of what to expect.

    On a separate note I have another question......
    It just seems like at times there is such a negative Ora surrounding those who may choose to have the goal of becoming a CRNA in their future. I am wondering if anyone in the above posts can shed some light as to why this is? I think it is a wonderful thing to be motivated and to have goals and work hard to achieve them. That is regardless of what avenue you chose to steer your career in nursing, whether you decide to continue your education or not! In any area of practice there is always room for advancement and upward mobility, it's a personal choice. I'm not saying that I necessarily wanted to blab to anyone that becoming a CRNA was a goal of mine and I really had no plan to mention it in any of my interviews, but why is this seen as "automatic big red X"? That kinda hurts...... I still have the same dedication and commitment just as any other nurse, striving to give the best care possible to every patient along my journey. Isn't THAT what should really be important? If anyone has anything to add please do, thanks again!!
  8. by   Boog'sCRRN246
    Training, orienting, and employing someone costs a lot of money and when a potential employee says in an interview that their goal is to be a CRNA, well, i think its safe for them to assume that you are only interested in their ICU in order to get your "One year Critical Care experienced required" for the CRNA program.
  9. by   lpn2crna1day
    Quote from Boog'sGirl724
    Training, orienting, and employing someone costs a lot of money and when a potential employee says in an interview that their goal is to be a CRNA, well, i think its safe for them to assume that you are only interested in their ICU in order to get your "One year Critical Care experienced required" for the CRNA program.
    I am aware that the time, money and energy used to orientate a new nurse, especially one in the ICU where orientation tends to be long is extensive. So I understand the need to want to find a candidate that you are not wasting your time on. However, I think (and it's just my opinion) that nurses WHO EXPRESS the desire to continue their education should be supported and encouraged at every opportunity because it contributes to strengthening the profession. And on a side note most of the schools that I have looked at require AT LEAST 2 YEARS of ICU experience, and strongly recommend that you take even more time than that to truly gain the skills and comfort level needed to be successful in the program. I don't plan on just trying to skim by with a year or two of experience. I plan to dedicate YEARS of my time, effort and energy to the ICU being the best nurse I can be before continuing my education. And thereafter giving a LIFETIME to the profession of nursing! There is just something about the negativity of it all that bothers me. Anyway thanks for letting me vent! If anyone else has comments to add please do. It all helps!
  10. by   cardiacRN2006
    Yea, we dont' like to feel used. Does that make sense? Because when people mention it in interviews that's exactly how it feels. Like we're being used for the mandatory experience, and as soon as you get it you will bail.

    We kinda don't like that.
  11. by   anurseuk
    I think it's a case of don't run before you can walk. There's nothing wrong with wanting to progress but your immediate goal should be to become a good and
    competent ICU nurse x
  12. by   lpn2crna1day
    Quote from anurseuk
    I think it's a case of don't run before you can walk. There's nothing wrong with wanting to progress but your immediate goal should be to become a good and
    competent ICU nurse x
    And I guess that is what I am saying. This is exactly what I plan to do! Becoming a CRNA is a very long term goal of mine. My entire journey to this point has been a case of learning to run before I walk. I am a long way from my goal which may be unclear to most. I currently have an associates degree as a RN. Next year I plan to work on my BSN while working as a RN preferably in the ICU but I realize it may not go that way to start. I plan to work for a number of years in the ICU, I started working in 1997 as a CNA, and went to school part time (because of being single mother of 2). Tested out to become an LPN and continued RN education. I already have 6 years of experience in the field of nursing therefore, I feel like I am definitely an example of someone who is learning to crawl before walking! There is nothing wrong with knowing what you want and taking well thought out and deliberate steps to make the path that is best for you. I think this is what I have done and will continue to do. I just think it's a shame that there is a stigma attached to it. That is all I am saying, just my .
  13. by   cardiacRN2006
    You're taking this too personally. Nobody said that there was anything wrong with becoming a CRNA. Nobody.

    We just don't want to hear about it during an interview. Can you tell the difference?
  14. by   lpn2crna1day
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    You're taking this too personally. Nobody said that there was anything wrong with becoming a CRNA. Nobody.

    We just don't want to hear about it during an interview. Can you tell the difference?
    I might be taking it a little personally. But I have run into this in other places than posts. Sorry if it seems like I am overreacting....lol. I just feel like if there was no stigma attached you should be able to be open and honest about it, in a interview (which I agree you shouldn't do) and/or on the floor. I can easily tell the difference I just think you SHOULD be able to be honest about it. I get that the nurses may at times feel used or like someone is just there for the requirement, but for me doesn't change the fact that I WANT to be there and give the best care possible. Does that make sense?

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