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Associates or Bachelors in Nursing

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by Ms. IamD Ms. IamD (New) New

Greetings to all.

I am a new member to this site and also a stressed out member as well. I recently received my bachelors degree in business this past summer and before I graduated I had a change of heart. I want to go into nursing!!! I am currently enrolled at local community college to take A&P1, this coming spring. I have been thinking about my choices on whether or not I should go into the RN associate program or the BSN program.

I do really want to go into the BSN program, because I feel it will make me more marketable, interms of seeking a job. I am aware that most or all BSN programs are 12-15 months long, I just question if it would be a good idea for myself to go into the BSN program, knowing that I have to work and that the BSN program will be intense with alot of work in so little time. Do you think I should look into a flexible nursing that offers a bachelors degree or simply go for my associates in nursing?

Any advice would appreciated and thank you in advance. :)

TheSquire, DNP, EMT-B, APN, NP

Specializes in Urgent Care NP, Emergency Nursing, Camp Nursing. Has 10 years experience.

This is a common topic on allnurses.com - rather than get long-winded in my response, I'll direct your attention to the search bar on the top of the page. Use it well.

I'll state my position briefly: If you're young, with your career ahead of you, and you have the ability to accumulate student loans without shooting yourself in the foot, then for the BSN up-front if you can. If you need to work, which may be the case, some flexible ABSN programs might work (or might not, due to the lack of financial aid since you already have a bachelors). Another option you can consider are the direct-entry masters programs, which generally combine RN coursework with some (though not usually all) APN coursework, at the same time qualifying you for GradPLUS loans.

This is a common topic on allnurses.com - rather than get long-winded in my response, I'll direct your attention to the search bar on the top of the page. Use it well.

I'll state my position briefly: If you're young, with your career ahead of you, and you have the ability to accumulate student loans without shooting yourself in the foot, then for the BSN up-front if you can. If you need to work, which may be the case, some flexible ABSN programs might work (or might not, due to the lack of financial aid since you already have a bachelors). Another option you can consider are the direct-entry masters programs, which generally combine RN coursework with some (though not usually all) APN coursework, at the same time qualifying you for GradPLUS loans.

Thanks for the info, I looked into some direct entry masters programs and the courses that are being offered are not of interest to me, so I prefer to go into the bachelors program first. In terms of financing for nursing school, I do believe I can get grants and/or scholarships.

Go for the BSN. I wish I could go straight to BSN, but since I have to work, I'm going ADN to BSN route. I can tell you, with the health care reform coming about, I believe that there will be a "pedigree" in healthcare - for those with private insurance, many new practices will be opening up, and my best guess is, they'll only want nurses with BSN's to staff them. I work in the insurance sector, so this is just an educated guess, but as many others have noted -- now that there isn't as much as a nursing "shortage" (or hospitals are doing more with less, as they like to say), employers can be a bit picker and now are starting to require BSN's. Good luck.

@ stefanyjoy, I read something similar about that in a general not too long ago. The ADN is a little more apealing, because there is greater chance of flexibility. I just want to be secured once I'm done with school. What would be the time frame for someone who has an ADN to complete their BSN?

I forgot to mention that I spoke to the chairwoman of one of the nursing programs, I'm interested in and she told me that it won't be a bad idea if I were to take 2-3 nursing classes at at time (knowing that I have to work). She just cautioned me that it will definitely take a longer time to complete (approx.4-5 yrs) and it can hinder me for excelling in the Nclex. :scrying: