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ASN or BSN?

alimasse alimasse (New) New

Hello,

I am very interested in becoming a PICU RN. I am getting ready to transfer from IU to Ivy Tech next fall to pursue a degree in nursing.

In order to get into the PICU unit, do you suggest that I earn a ASN or BSN degree? If everything goes well, I would also like to eventually get my Master's degree too. What do you think?

Thanks!

tryingtohaveitall

Specializes in PICU.

I suppose it depends on the job market where you'll end up. My PICU has both ADNs and BSNs, but in general I do believe BSNs stand a much better chance of landing a PICU job as a new grad.

Does IU not have a BSN program? Why are you transferring?

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology.

If you're already planning to do a MScN then I think you'd do best to go for the BScN now rather than ASN.

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU.

My PICU is only hiring BSN graduates. We also rarely hire without experience. That's the trend in New Jersey and neighboring states at the moment. It depends on your area and the job market where you live, but in general, most hospitals will want a BSN degree. If you want to get your MSN, you'll need a BSN first anyway. I think it's a lot easier to get your BSN straight out of high school rather than get the ADN, work, get a BSN while working, and then get your MSN while working.

My advice would be to go for the BSN. While in school, try to get a position as a CNA or PCT working with children. It can be a hospital unit, Peds LTC, home health, anything that gives you experience working with children. Do as many elective clinicals in pediatrics as possible. While you're there, make sure you shine and network, network, network! These connections will be invaluable when looking for a job.

Remember that even after all this work, you might not get a job in PICU right out of school. Be willing to accept a different position in order to gain the necessary experience before trying to transfer.

Finally, leave yourself open to possibilities. I know many nursing students who wanted to be a peds nurse before they actually tried it. Then they realized that caring for sick children was not for them. You might go to nursing school and find that you fall in love with a field you never considered. It's great to have a goal, but make sure you give yourself the chance to experience other areas too.

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