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Anyone with RSD?

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by Hoozdo Hoozdo, ADN (Member) Platinum

Hoozdo has 15 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections.

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[color=#990033]reflex sympathetic dystrophy?

 

i was tentatively d/xed with it today :angryfire

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jolleygirl has 34 years experience and specializes in 27 yrs in long term care, 5 yrs office.

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My sister has been dx w/rsd for several yrs now. I know some people have in lower body, hers is upper right, back, neck shoulder, down the arm and hand. She's seen many docs. and had all kinds of treatment, inc. a stimulator implanted, times 3. Good luck to you

Anna

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Hoozdo has 15 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections.

1,541 Posts; 13,544 Profile Views

My sister has been dx w/rsd for several yrs now. I know some people have in lower body, hers is upper right, back, neck shoulder, down the arm and hand. She's seen many docs. and had all kinds of treatment, inc. a stimulator implanted, times 3. Good luck to you

Anna

Thanks Anna, at least mine is on the left and the same places as your sister. Could be worse if it was my right!

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woody62 has 27 years experience as a RN and specializes in icu, er, transplant, case management, ps.

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I had one client, back in the middle 80's, that suffered from RSD. The treatment prosed was painful but reliable. Steroids, treatment with a type of physical therapy where his hand and arm were placed in an enclosed device, bombarded with tiny piece of corn cobs and warm air, as well as physical therapy with active and passive range of motion. It was extremely painful, at first but was successful in the treatment. It has to be done within a relatively short period of time from diagnoses.

Kitty:balloons:

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Hoozdo has 15 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections.

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I had one client, back in the middle 80's, that suffered from RSD. The treatment prosed was painful but reliable. Steroids, treatment with a type of physical therapy where his hand and arm were placed in an enclosed device, bombarded with tiny piece of corn cobs and warm air, as well as physical therapy with active and passive range of motion. It was extremely painful, at first but was successful in the treatment. It has to be done within a relatively short period of time from diagnoses.

Kitty:balloons:

Corn cobs :idea: I think I would have to be put under general anesthesia for that one The one good thing is that I was dxed quickly which helps a lot with the prognosis. I have been through the prednisone thing already. I am scheduled for a sympathetic nerve block on Monday which should tell me if I REALLY have this. Thanks for the input

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woody62 has 27 years experience as a RN and specializes in icu, er, transplant, case management, ps.

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Corn cobs :idea: I think I would have to be put under general anesthesia for that one The one good thing is that I was dxed quickly which helps a lot with the prognosis. I have been through the prednisone thing already. I am scheduled for a sympathetic nerve block on Monday which should tell me if I REALLY have this. Thanks for the input

They really were not as painful as you think. I put my own hand and arm into the device and it wasn't as painful as you think. The steroids I mention were infused, not taken by mouth. Question, on x-ray have you sown any signs of demineralization yet?

Woody

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Hoozdo has 15 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections.

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They really were not as painful as you think. I put my own hand and arm into the device and it wasn't as painful as you think. The steroids I mention were infused, not taken by mouth. Question, on x-ray have you sown any signs of demineralization yet?

Woody

I don't know Woody. I have a whole body bone density scan next week in addition to a thermogram. My cervical MRI showed osteopenia.....but I guess that would be normal at my old age of 52!

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woody62 has 27 years experience as a RN and specializes in icu, er, transplant, case management, ps.

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I don't know Woody. I have a whole body bone density scan next week in addition to a thermogram. My cervical MRI showed osteopenia.....but I guess that would be normal at my old age of 52!

Inactivity of the affected limb causes demineralization approximately six months after the onset of RSD. It is for this reason, that it is recommended that no matter how painful, one must do the active and passive ROM. The demineralization can clearly be seen on a simple x-ray. I have never had this disorder but I have had clients with it. And the rehab doctor I used, strongly recommended an intensive course of P.T. regardless of the pain.

I did have one patient who was very successful in inflicting the symptoms on himself. Each time I saw him or he was seen by a doctor, his arm would be swollen, cool to touch, slightly diaphortic and extremely painful. But his x-rays never showed any demineralization despite his refusal to engage in therapy. We finally learned what he had done when he made the mistake of throwing his wife out and moving a girlfriend in. A woman scorned..... He would wrap his affected arm in a towel or two, then bang it repeatedly on the arm of the sofa in his living room. I found out two days before he was to have a settlement hearing before the administrative law judge. Needless to say, his settlement was greatly reduced. He was lucky the insurance company didn't press for charges of making a false claim.

Woody:balloons:

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Hoozdo has 15 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections.

1,541 Posts; 13,544 Profile Views

inactivity of the affected limb causes demineralization approximately six months after the onset of rsd. it is for this reason, that it is recommended that no matter how painful, one must do the active and passive rom. the demineralization can clearly be seen on a simple x-ray. i have never had this disorder but i have had clients with it. and the rehab doctor i used, strongly recommended an intensive course of p.t. regardless of the pain."

 

i start intensive pt on my l arm next week. i will go everyday if i have to! i don't care if it is painful; i have pain meds. i have to get this under control before it becomes permanent!

a woman scorned..... he would wrap his affected arm in a towel or two, then bang it repeatedly on the arm of the sofa in his living room. i found out two days before he was to have a settlement hearing before the administrative law judge.

wow, that takes a lot of chutzpah! i am impressed a layperson would even know about this disease. it's not very common, i have never heard of it before. neither have any of my icu pals at work.

needless to say, his settlement was greatly reduced. he was lucky the insurance company didn't press for charges of making a false claim.

woody:balloons:

thanks for the input woody. i have found a fantastic support group online for rds. it is nice to compare notes with others and share a bit of my nursing knowledge. needless to say, i have been spending a lot of time researching this neurological disorder since the "maybe" d/x.

thanks again ;)

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woody62 has 27 years experience as a RN and specializes in icu, er, transplant, case management, ps.

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This all happen prior to the computor age. I don't know where he learned about RSD but he did. The rehab doctor, who was an old friend of mine, was surprised when I told him. But thought he was pretty crafty. I have had a few clients that have tried to pull the wool over the eyes of their insurance company and myself. I always went into a case with "I'm here to help you. And I will. But please don't attempt to decive me, I will not like it" Most got the message. The few that didn't learned just how good I was at snopping out fraud. I think that out of the over 5,000 case I handled, I had ten that committed fraud.

Woody:balloons:

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Hoozdo has 15 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections.

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LOL, Woody. You know, I came across the corn cob theory online the other day. Except it's not corn cobs..........it was corn meal. I thought flying corn cobs would be awfully rough on a body!:lol2::lol2:

Now, let's hear from some of you other nurses. Raise your hand if you NEVER HEARD of this d/x!

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woody62 has 27 years experience as a RN and specializes in icu, er, transplant, case management, ps.

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LOL, Woody. You know, I came across the corn cob theory online the other day. Except it's not corn cobs..........it was corn meal. I thought flying corn cobs would be awfully rough on a body!:lol2::lol2:

Now, let's hear from some of you other nurses. Raise your hand if you NEVER HEARD of this d/x!

I got the corn part right.:lol2::lol2::lol2:

Woody:balloons:

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