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Anyone in a professional nursing organization?

Kishi Kishi (New) New

If you are in a professional nursing organization and would not mind answering a few questions, I would greatly appreciate it! I have a small paper due tomorrow. Thanks!!!

1. What organization are you a member of?

2. What is structure and function of the organization?

3. How does the organization benefit the profession of nursing?

4. What benefits do you get from belonging to that professional organization?

5. Has the organization been active in any political issues within the last year?

6. Why do you belong to this nursing organization?

FLArn

Specializes in Hospice, LTC, Rehab, Home Health.

Read the replies to the post "Can someone answer a few questions for me". That OP obviously is in your class as they had the same assignment as you! Good luck!

muesli

Specializes in Emergency Nursing.

If you are in a professional nursing organization and would not mind answering a few questions, I would greatly appreciate it! I have a small paper due tomorrow. Thanks!!!

1. What organization are you a member of?

2. What is structure and function of the organization?

3. How does the organization benefit the profession of nursing?

4. What benefits do you get from belonging to that professional organization?

5. Has the organization been active in any political issues within the last year?

6. Why do you belong to this nursing organization?

1. Massachusetts Nurse Association

2. It's a union masquerading as a professional nursing organization. They used to be solely a professional nurse association, but decided to become a union, at which point detractors broke off and formed the Massachusetts Association of Registered Nurses, which does not have compulsory membership/union dues because it is not a union and therefore is not as powerful. The MNA advocates politically on behalf of nursing interests which sometimes coincide with patient interests. I don't know much about the structure. It's divided into regions. If a hospital is part of a union, there are union representatives within each hospital (bargaining unit). Nurses who are hired into those hospitals are basically mandated to give union dues and become a member. You can decline membership but still must pay dues.

3. They advocate politically on the state level and along with a national nurse union for federal laws pertaining to nursing.

4. Union reps bargain every few years for a contract which includes benefits and an increase in pay.

5. Lately they've been advocating for a safe staffing bill in Massachusetts.

6. Because I was hired at a union hospital

1. What organization are you a member of? National Student Nurses' Association

2. What is structure and function of the organization?

http://www.nsna.org/AboutUs.aspx

3. How does the organization benefit the profession of nursing?

"NSNA’s mission is to mentor students preparing for initial licensure as registered nurses, and to convey the standards, ethics, and skills that students will need as responsible and accountable leaders and members of the profession."

4. What benefits do you get from belonging to that professional organization?

I hold an officer position in my school's chapter, so I get a lot of leadership development. We do a lot for our students as far as resume and interview skills, social events, and mentoring. We also stay very involved in our community. We choose one non-profit community organization each semester to focus on volunteering and donating to. We also try to be active in walks and fundraisers for health associations like Juvenile Diabetes and March of Dimes.

5. Has the organization been active in any political issues within the last year?

http://www.minoritynurse.com/print/4628

The NSNA has an ongoing political agenda which encourages culturally diverse students to pursue nursing, called Breakthrough to Nursing. The 2010-2011 agenda is on that link.

6. Why do you belong to this nursing organization? I feel like a big part of nursing is professional development. I want to stand out when compared to other people in my field. I feel a duty to strive for, protect and maintain the profession of nursing. This is how I can contribute as a student.

I also joined AWHONN, and I am rolling my NSNA membership over into the ANA next month.

I used to be but the dues were pretty high. Now, this same organization, the ANA, is wanting to bring in foreign nurses to fill positions that our own US grads can't get! Can you say "ANA sold us out"?

1. What organization are you a member of? National Student Nurses' Association

2. What is structure and function of the organization?

http://www.nsna.org/AboutUs.aspx

3. How does the organization benefit the profession of nursing?

"NSNA's mission is to mentor students preparing for initial licensure as registered nurses, and to convey the standards, ethics, and skills that students will need as responsible and accountable leaders and members of the profession."

4. What benefits do you get from belonging to that professional organization?

I hold an officer position in my school's chapter, so I get a lot of leadership development. We do a lot for our students as far as resume and interview skills, social events, and mentoring. We also stay very involved in our community. We choose one non-profit community organization each semester to focus on volunteering and donating to. We also try to be active in walks and fundraisers for health associations like Juvenile Diabetes and March of Dimes.

5. Has the organization been active in any political issues within the last year?

http://www.minoritynurse.com/print/4628

The NSNA has an ongoing political agenda which encourages culturally diverse students to pursue nursing, called Breakthrough to Nursing. The 2010-2011 agenda is on that link.

6. Why do you belong to this nursing organization? I feel like a big part of nursing is professional development. I want to stand out when compared to other people in my field. I feel a duty to strive for, protect and maintain the profession of nursing. This is how I can contribute as a student.

I also joined AWHONN, and I am rolling my NSNA membership over into the ANA next month.

Don't join the ANA. See my post above. They have sold us out.

1. What organization are you a member of?

Sigma Theta Tau

2. What is structure and function of the organization?

Structure of governance is House of Delegates to International Board of Directors to Staff

3. How does the organization benefit the profession of nursing?

Promotes leadership and research to the field of nursing

4. What benefits do you get from belonging to that professional organization?

I have access to research articles through this organization

5. Has the organization been active in any political issues within the last year?

None that I am aware of

6. Why do you belong to this nursing organization?

It should help with either landing a job and makes me promotable. It can also keep me abreast of current trends in research in nursing.

Murse901, MSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, Case Management, Informatics.

Don't join the ANA. See my post above. They have sold us out.

I joined the ANA. After paying what I thought was a pretty hefty amount ($278 for ANA and state) for an organization that doesn't offer any significant and direct benefit to me, they were calling me every weekend asking for donations until I told them to stop calling.

I'd like to see a source for your claim that they support bringing in foreign nurses, though. If you can point me to a credible source on that, I definitely won't renew the membership. If we can't trust the AMERICAN Nurses' Association to have American nurses' best interests in mind, what good are they?

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

I used to be but the dues were pretty high. Now, this same organization, the ANA, is wanting to bring in foreign nurses to fill positions that our own US grads can't get! Can you say "ANA sold us out"?

To the tune of 20,000 a year and the "membership is $500.00"

http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d112:h.r.1929:#

muesli

Specializes in Emergency Nursing.

looks like Kishi has opened a can of worms lol.

Regarding the ANA's position on encouraging foreign nurses to counteract (the very debatable) nursing shortage:

http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/vol132008/No1Jan08/ArticlePreviousTopic/ForeignEducatedNurses.aspx

The Mass. Nurses Association disaffiliated from the ANA a while ago, it seems like the reason being that it wanted to require member states' unions to be under the umbrella structure of the ANA union. In addition, they differed in a few points of legislative advocacy, such as patient:nurse ratios.

http://www.massnurses.org/news-and-events/archive/2001/p/openItem/2010

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