Any Guidance or Suggestions Appreciated

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Hello all.

I graduated the pn program in December 2016 and was subsequently denied approval to sit for the PN-NCLEX for criminal conviction, substance abuse, and conduct evidencing moral unfittness.

I reached out to an attorney who told me to wait six months to a year and reapply with the assistance of a licensing attorney which I priced at $3000 up front retainer and $250 per hour. This is not feasible but I'd hate to think that God would bring me through everything I've faced only to end in failure.

I'm open for any suggestions or guidance from everyone.

Thank you.

Sour Lemon

5,016 Posts

Has 13 years experience.
Hello all.

I graduated the pn program in December 2016 and was subsequently denied approval to sit for the PN-NCLEX for criminal conviction, substance abuse, and conduct evidencing moral unfittness.

I reached out to an attorney who told me to wait six months to a year and reapply with the assistance of a licensing attorney which I priced at $3000 up front retainer and $250 per hour. This is not feasible but I'd hate to think that God would bring me through everything I've faced only to end in failure.

I'm open for any suggestions or guidance from everyone.

Thank you.

If you're not sure you trust what the first lawyer told you, I would recommend getting the opinion of a second layer. It's sounds like an uphill battle, though.

And sitting for boards is only the next baby step. If you succeed to that point, you'll then have to find an employer willing to hire you.

Jere2911

13 Posts

The charges were DWI with the last arrest in 2013 which was eventually ajudicated in 2015 where I received 5 years probation, 300 hours of community service, and restitution and required to complete treatment. I've met all conditions and have made significant lifestyle changes. I'm set to be released from probation in Jan 2018 for earned compliance.

I received glowing reccomendations from the nursing program director and wase honored to be voted class speaker. I was able to practice for 90 days after graduating and received yet another excellent eval & recommendation from my DON there. The administrator even offered to plead my case in person to the board of nursing, however they would not meet with him citing privacy rules.

I loved what I did for those 3 months as I proudly cared for and continously advocated for those less fortunate or in worse circumstances than should be allowed.

On paper, I look like a monster due to a short 3 year season where I stumbled, fell hard, and landed in a pit that I didn't know how to even begin to get out of.

In person, I'm a broken man that has been humbled with underserved blessings and tools, techniques, and resources that I somehow missed during my younger years of development.

I don't like what happened, but I can't change it either. So I chose to own it, identify with what happened, and use the scars of my life in sharing it with others with hopes if helping and encouraging those still trapped in addiction. I am attending training to become a facilitator for a SMART recovery group in my area.

I understand this is an uphill battle but nothing worth having has ever been easy for me.

Thank you for your honest response. It gives me perspective.

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

4,123 Posts

Specializes in NICU. Has 8 years experience.

You knew this was going to be an issue before starting nursing school. Why weren't you proactive and talk to the BON before starting the program and get it all straightened out so that you don't waste time after graduation?

Jere2911

13 Posts

I diligently investigated all possible dead end roads including multiple phone calls to the BON. I disclosed my criminal history was quite frank in asking if I would or could ever test for licensure. Their response was that they don't make decisions and that everyone's application is decided on a case-by-case basis. Puzzled, I said, "so I have to spend $20,000.00 on a PN program or $40,000.00 for an RN program and then submit my application and cross my fingers?" The voice on the telephone coldly said, "yeah, pretty much."