ANP v. GNP

Specialties NP

Published

I am looking to possibly attend graduate school for NP. Now the question is, which NP? I was interested in Geriatric NP for a long time because I like to work with the elderly and this is a hot area since this population is on the rise. My professors are also encouraging GNP. My school would probably also offer scholarship since not a lot of people show interest in this area. The other side is Adult NP. I feel that ANP would be more wise since I would be able to work with a broader patient base and get into other areas of the hospital. No offense to the geriatric patients. I feel that I could work with geriatric patients with an ANP. I have just looked and researched jobs for GNP's and there aren't any specifically GNP's. So, does anyone think GNP is limiting, or not, or ANP would be a better idea to branch out?

Thanks! =) Any input is appreciated!:yeah:

Sheri FNP-C

147 Posts

According to my Fitzgerald syllabus, ANPs can see patients age 13 and up. GNPs can only see patients age 55 and up (if ANCC certified) or 65 and up (if AANP certified).

Even in long term care there are patients younger than the age parameters for GNP. I would think the market for GNPs would be very slim. I honestly can't think of anywhere an NP would only see gero patients. Mostly gero, yes...only gero, I can't think of one.

It seems like ANP would certainly provide more opportunities.

core0

1,830 Posts

I am looking to possibly attend graduate school for NP. Now the question is, which NP? I was interested in Geriatric NP for a long time because I like to work with the elderly and this is a hot area since this population is on the rise. My professors are also encouraging GNP. My school would probably also offer scholarship since not a lot of people show interest in this area. The other side is Adult NP. I feel that ANP would be more wise since I would be able to work with a broader patient base and get into other areas of the hospital. No offense to the geriatric patients. I feel that I could work with geriatric patients with an ANP. I have just looked and researched jobs for GNP's and there aren't any specifically GNP's. So, does anyone think GNP is limiting, or not, or ANP would be a better idea to branch out?

Thanks! =) Any input is appreciated!:yeah:

There are a number of states that don't recognize GNPs. Most GNP programs allow you to test for the ANP instead. With the ANCCs decision to allow other NPs to certify without additional didactic and clinical work this will probably grow. Bottom line is that you can get your ANP then after a year of gerentology work get your GNP certification. If you get the GNP cert first you may limit your options (and states you can work in). Basically a longer version of what SheriStudentFNP said.

David Carpenter, PA-C

Gator FNP

65 Posts

Specializes in family, internal, pediatric.

Go for ANP, you would be more marketable. As Sheri states, there are younger patients in a long term care facility. I can remember seeing a patient as young as early 20s. He was in the assisted living area.

frankyfern22

29 Posts

Specializes in Neurology NP.

Great! Thanks for the advice. I think that by deliberating, Adult NP would certainly be a better option. The floor I work on now is Telemetry and it's pretty much Geriatric clients! I don't think you need a special GNP to care for older clients. They're everywhere. Spanks a lot =)

mlajoy

13 Posts

Specializes in Adult & Geriatrics.

I am in an NP program that allows one to study both ANP & GNP at the same time. Points made thus far are valid and well taken, but let's face it...there are many things out there our older population face that need preparation for management (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's, etc.); even the presentation of certain diseases (both physical and mental) are much more different than in "adults". I personally believe that because many feel as though the geriatric population is included in the "adult" population then just obtaining an ANP should be suffice. That is an unfortunate mindset IMO. There are not many geriatricians/GNPs out there because if we are going to be honest with ourselves, it is not typically appealing to people (regardless of one's states' recognition or not) Why??? That is for an individual to decide. Ultimately, being able to see the 65+ population is one thing, but being able to competently/effectively treat them is another.

IMABSNRN

56 Posts

Specializes in Geriatrics..
According to my Fitzgerald syllabus, ANPs can see patients age 13 and up. GNPs can only see patients age 55 and up (if ANCC certified) or 65 and up (if AANP certified).

Even in long term care there are patients younger than the age parameters for GNP. I would think the market for GNPs would be very slim. I honestly can't think of anywhere an NP would only see gero patients. Mostly gero, yes...only gero, I can't think of one.

It seems like ANP would certainly provide more opportunities.

I work with a psych NP who was a GNP first. He says he would never recommend doing just the gero NP because it limits you severely.

I'm trying to get into an adult/gero NP program. I hope I'm making a good choice.

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