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alternative program to DMU...

Posted

Well I and RN addicted to opiates, clean for 4 1/2 yrs., completed the voluntary alternative program in June 2010 (3 1/2 yrs), had inactive nursing license in another state that says now that I refused to do there program when I started the alternative program in my state....which is not true, they would not accept information at the time from me it had to be the BON from my state that was suppose to send it but they would not do that....so long story short a year ago had to pay and atty..to represent me to the prosecuting atty for this state where my inactive license has been to see if they would accept my completion letter of the alternative program i just finished......well year later and after being ordered to go to have assessment evaluation done by their provider......their BON said NO.....they will not accept it.....I have to do their states program now ( another 3 yrs) but it is not their voluntary alternative program they are throwing me into their disciplinary program and it is on my record in that state forever now......that my license has history of disciplinary action.......my license will stay expired in this state because I don't plan on working in this state ever......i am thankful I am working in a good nursing job and I guess now I will have to stay here until i retire because I don't know if anyone will hire me anywhere else if I should ever relocate to another state......My license in the state I live now is clear, there is nothing showing I ever had discipline taken because I completed their program successfully.....so my question is if i ever should relocate would I have to say anything about this state where my license is in expired status....??? Or just go with my active license that is in good standing..... :)

syckRN

Specializes in Emergency Department, House Supervisor. Has 15 years experience.

Hi There,

I have a similar program in that I left NC's voluntary program when I moved to CA, where I already had an active license. NC was not happy and I am not welcome to work in that state. However, I DO have a free and clear license in CA after completing their voluntary Diversion program (4 years of torture!!). I can totally relate to your issue. The CA program was so much more difficult than the NC program, yet NC would not accept their certificate of completion. Hopefully I will not ever have a reason to work as a nurse in NC. Sorry for your troubles.

Syck Syck SyckRN!

Edited by Silverdragon102
TOS pm to member

hey syckRN thanks for your reply back.....I appreciate it.....I am just sad that I have to do this Penn. program now after completing the program in my state that I reside in.....it is like double jeopardy but they do not care.....well I just hope their DMU that I have to do now is not worse than what I just completed....I also hope my montoring agent is a nice person like the one I had in the other program.......thanks for listening......:)

jackstem

Specializes in Impaired Nurse Advocate, CRNA, ER,. Has 34 years experience.

Just as the nurse practice act varies from state to state, so too alternative to discipline programs (AP) vary as well. While compact agreements between some states allow a nurse to practice in those compact states, there is no such compact when it comes to AP programs. Since there is so much ignorance in our profession regarding this disease it doesn't surprise me that one state won't accept a graduate from another state's program. Just one more sign of the ignorance and incompetence of the nursing profession when it comes to this disease.

jack

thanks Jack for your reply...I appreciate it....what do you think if i ever relocate to another state, well my husband and I hope to relocate after i am done with this disp. prog. in Pa., if i apply for a license in this state (wyoming) and my license that i reside in now is in good standing .....do i have to mention my expired license in pa. that i haven't even used in over 12 yrs.? Just thought I would ask to see if anyone else had any similar experiences. Thanks...:)

syckRN

Specializes in Emergency Department, House Supervisor. Has 15 years experience.

NO, you don't. unless your employer asks specifically. And I have left this blank before and gotten away with it. However, if you put on your resume a job that you held in the state where you are not in good standing...they might think to check your record in that state.

Also, when I moved from NC to CA, it was the NC BON who sent the complaint to CA and that is how I came to be a participant in CA's program.

Hope this info helps. It is just my own personal experience in a nightmare similar to your own.

SyckRN

jackstem

Specializes in Impaired Nurse Advocate, CRNA, ER,. Has 34 years experience.

thanks Jack for your reply...I appreciate it....what do you think if i ever relocate to another state, well my husband and I hope to relocate after i am done with this disp. prog. in Pa., if i apply for a license in this state (wyoming) and my license that i reside in now is in good standing .....do i have to mention my expired license in pa. that i haven't even used in over 12 yrs.? Just thought I would ask to see if anyone else had any similar experiences. Thanks...:)

Since the states are so different when it comes to their nurse practice act (NPA), the first thing I recommend is to read the NPA in any state you're considering seeking licensure. If it's unclear how they deal with this issue, I recommend you consult with an experienced license defense attorney in that state. It could very well be money well spent to avoid some of the serious consequences of making an innocent, unintentional mistake in the application process. There is a web site where the board from any state can check to see if there is action against your license. With the internet, email, and compact states it is fairly easy to discover inactive licenses and actions or restrictions against most nurses.

While many people here and on other nursing web sites pooh pooh the use of an attorney, I would never consider doing anything that might adversely affect my license without consulting a license defense attorney. I consult with an attorney on cases involving diversion and substance use disorders. It's amazing how little, unintentional mistakes can snowball into a living, breathing monster that can be difficult to straighten out.

A good resource to find an attorney is The American Association of Nurse Attorneys.

Jack

AimeepawsRN

Specializes in OR, ER, Oncology, CPC. Has 15 years experience.

Good info Jack. I wished I would have known about this site a few years back. I turned myself into the BON and voluntarily went into peer but still have adverse licensure actions on my record. I no longer have restrictions but worry that this will adversley effect my career in the future. I do work as an RN coder but would like to eventually do PRN patient care. We shall see!

I look forward to all of your posts and replies :)