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advice for post grad pursuing ABSN

Career   (474 Views | 6 Replies)

362 Profile Views; 15 Posts

Hi all,

I'm a recent college grad, as of December 2019, with my B.S in Health Sciences. I am from Florida and have applied to multiple programs. I had the desire to start this upcoming January, but due to miscommunication from one of the schools I am applying to, I have been offered a last minute interview..but the program starts in the middle of January. I was hoping to know prior to graduating, but it was a mess and it's very stressful it took this long (transcripts + etc). It is not my #1 choice, but it is inexpensive and I would be done the following spring (4 semesters). I can also defer my application until the fall of 2020. The others start this upcoming summer. I am wait-listed for my #1 choice, which is a direct-admit MSN program, and am submitting apps that I will be hearing back from in March.

I am basically seeking advice from those who are currently in ABSN programs or had graduated from one. Is it worth waiting for others instead of rushing into it? I worked all of college and was in a sorority on top of classes. I'm eager to start nursing school because I wasn't accepted in undergrad, but I wanted to hear whether waiting and taking a break is recommended before diving right in. I am unsure and don't want to make the wrong choice. I plan on going straight to a DNP in Gerontology or Psych/Mental Health. 

Thanks and best wishes on the new decade 🙂

Edited by futurepsychnurse98

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61 Posts; 1,842 Profile Views

I have not completed an ABSN but I have applied, been accepted and almost started many times - #life. But what I can tell you is my 1st choice school has changed several times depending on my circumstances. The program I almost started was very prestigious, expensive, and private (but non-profit). Then I considered a school further away, but didactic online, newer program. Now I'm wanting to start a for-profit with a good pass rate and lowest cost so far. I've done my research and found some current students on Instagram and asked them for the scoop. All I can say is if their pass rates are good enough and you think you would fit in there, consider it.

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TheAngryNurse is a EMT-B and specializes in Student.

4 Posts; 31 Profile Views

I was am enrolled in an ABSN program. The first semester was not too bad (although technically i did not finish...got a concussion in week 10...going to restart next semester...ugh).

The amount of work is similar to any B.S. in a physical or natural science with labs. It's best to keep work at a minimum, but there are people who work 1-2 shifts a week at their respective jobs.

I opted for an ABSN rather then direct entry MSN, as if you get burned out before your three years are up you have no degree, where a ABSN program is only 16 months or so. You can get an advanced degree later. 
So far it is a lot of fun. Don't get too stressed. 

Hope this helps.

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HappyCCRN1 is a BSN and specializes in Burn and Surgical/Trauma ICU.

33 Posts; 531 Profile Views

I graduated with a BS in Biology, decided I wanted to go back to school for nursing, and puttered around a little deciding which program (and length of programs) would be best for my circumstances. I was out of school after my first degree for a year before starting my 13 month ABSN. If I had the opportunity to immediately start the ABSN upon graduation, I absolutely would have done so. I would have done it then, and with a little bit of hindsight, my answer is the same. I did not work during the program. I knew that I would want to eventually go on for a DNP and that grades were very important, so that was my priority. There were some people that worked a little bit from home, but very occasionally. Also, I enjoyed nursing school! I loved learning nerdy nurse things. So I feel like the break that I had would not have been necessary. Obviously, it's difficult to make that assumption since I did in fact have it. The program was definitely fast-paced, but my first degree was at a very small, cheap school, so it did not take much out of me, and is another reason I feel I could have immediately started the nursing program. 

Both of my degrees were at small, low-tier schools. But I made decent grades, went on to work at several large hospitals that provided a plethora of learning opportunities and growth, and now six years later I am accepted into a couple of really great CRNA programs! I came to regret not going to a more well-known university for either degree, but for personal reasons only. I was fortunate that it did not have an impact on getting the jobs I wanted. And now I have the opportunity to earn a graduate degree from a prestigious school. If I did not have that, then perhaps I would feel differently and instead encourage you to hold out for your number one choice. 

Decide what things are most important to you. If you feel like you could benefit from a break--emotionally, mentally, financially...then do so. For me, financially, I knew that with the money I would make as a nurse, I would be able to pay off any debt incurred from loans quicker versus working a job and saving up before starting the program. Again, just me. Everyone is obviously different and has different priorities.

Figure out what benefits you would gain in holding out for your first choice school versus starting in this other program right away and vice versa.

Good luck!

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oncall4all specializes in microbiology, biotechnology.

2 Posts; 11 Profile Views

Speaking from my own experience, an accelerated program is very intense. Some ABSN programs range from 12mo, 15mo, 16mo.  Mine was 12 mo and I was told the first day "if you are in a relationship, make sure your partner is VERY supportive.  If not, break up with him or her!" Well mine wasn't, and it impacted my progress in the program! I have noticed that a lot of the programs now have increased the program length up to 24mo.  My advice: 

1) I was waitlisted at MECN(Masters Entry Clinical Nurse) and didn't get in.  Yes I was heartbroken. It doesn't mater what is behind your name ADN,BSN, MECN an RN is what you want to be right? 

2)Get as much nursing experience FIRST- volunteer at hospitals, nursing home, extended care facility, veteran's hospital, shadow a nurse, work at a clinic, get CNA or EMT, Psych Tech, or Phlebotomist Training.  Trust me this helped before I entered my clinicals in nursing school and will prepare you to be NP.

3) Go for the least expensive 4 semester route.  Also defer and start in Fall to give yourself a break from your studies.  I would have done far better in a slower paced ABSN. 

Good luck and hope this helps 😊

 

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5 Posts; 69 Profile Views

It all depends on where your mindset is right now.  I'm currently in a 12 month ABSN program, and it is tough but doable.  I was actually finishing up a master's degree in health care management when my nursing classes started in May.  I could've deferred until January and started their 16 month program, but I was beyond ready to get my nursing path started.  I was still very much in school mode so that transition was easy; however, studying for nursing is very different.  You need to make sure you are ready to adjust study habits/patters, likely have tests every week, and likely start clinicals very soon (in my program, we started clinicals 4 weeks into the program!).  

In my opinion, if you are physically, mentally, emotionally, and financially ready to start the program, just do it!  Even if it is not your first choice, is it a good school?  Do they have good NCLEX pass rates?  What supports do they have for students that might be struggling?  My program was not initially my first choice, but it started sooner than other programs and was shorter.  I am so glad I started this one because I love my professors and surprisingly love having a smaller class size than I originally thought I wanted.  

I wish you the best in your decision!

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15 Posts; 362 Profile Views

Thank you everyone!

Their 2018 NCLEX pass rate was a 93.33% which isn't too great but not the worst. They kinda of screwed me over because they gave me 24 hour notice for an interview, despite me emailing multiple times. After calling today (FINALLY GOT AN ANSWER), and they said I should be fine being admitted for Fall 2020 because of my stats, and since there are more applicants for the regular program rather than the accelerated. The other in-state schools I applied for have pass rates of over 97% and are ones I would prefer to attend. I am so far enjoying not being in school. I think I needed a break despite how much I wanted to start ASAP and still am in school mode. I decided not to use my CNA license for the time being because most jobs want a long-term commitment. I am hoping to either be removed from the waitlist, or attend one of my other 3 options. I will keep everyone updated 🙂

Edited by futurepsychnurse98

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