Jump to content

Admitting Privileges

Posted

I was wondering if nurse practitioners in any of the independent-practice states also have independent admitting privileges. Does anyone know? Thanks! :)

I'd be interested to know the answer to this myself...anyone know?

AbeFrohman, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac, Pulmonary, Anesthesia. Has 2 years experience.

This is more dependent on the hospital than the state.

So some hospitals allow NP's to have admitting privileges?

AbeFrohman, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac, Pulmonary, Anesthesia. Has 2 years experience.

Yes. They do.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Hmmm - doubt it as CMS (and therefore Medicaid) require a physician be the admitting entity.

AbeFrohman, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac, Pulmonary, Anesthesia. Has 2 years experience.

On advance for NP/PA, there is a survey report that indicates at least 7 of those surveyed had admitting privileges. So it exist somewhere, perhaps they admit and the MD just signs off on it somewhere after the fact.

On advance for NP/PA, there is a survey report that indicates at least 7 of those surveyed had admitting privileges. So it exist somewhere, perhaps they admit and the MD just signs off on it somewhere after the fact.

If you look back a year of so you will find this exact same discussion. Basically it boils down to your definition of admit. I have admission privileges as do all the NPs and PAs that I work with. Its one of the boxes that you check when you apply for privileges. What this does is allow you to write admission orders on the patient. You have to have a supervising physician that also has admission privileges. Note that not all physicians have admission privileges. Many physicians are consult only and cannot admit patients.

What I am assuming the OP meant was can an NP admit and manage a hospitalized patient without any physician involvement. The answer to this last year is probably the same as this year. No they cannot. There are many obstacles which would include state law, hospital bylaws and insurance regulations. The fact that 7 people in an anonymous internet survey answered an unclear question in the affirmative does not constitute proof.

On the other hand it is completely possible for a patient to be admitted and discharged and never see a physician. That doesn't mean the physician is not involved or responsible.

David Carpenter, PA-C

In my last NP position in nephrology, I had admission privleges and admitted our patients for nephrology or other acute concerns. I wrote admission orders, did daily rounds, even coordinated transfers on in and outpatients. I have since transferred departments to a new family practice clinic in my hometown and the local hospital does not allow NP's admission privleges due to hospital by-laws, or so I've been told. I would love to work as a hospitalist, I'm hoping it becomes a reality in the future.....

nomadcrna, CRNA, NP

Specializes in Anesthesia, Pain, Emergency Medicine. Has 30 years experience.

NPs have admitting privileges in many small hospitals in Montana. NPs also have total independent practice as well.