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$100,000 for accelerated BSN to MSN?

dre13day dre13day (New) New

Hi everyone,

I am not a nurse but considering going back to school. I'm in the alternative/natural medicine field, absolutely love what I do for my career, but it is not a stable and consistent business. I need more stability for my family and I.

For me, logically the next step would be to enter into Western medicine. Where I live, there is an accelerated BSN to MSN program. All said and done, the student loan (without interest) will be about $100,000. Does this seem reasonable to the nurses out there? I went to an information session recently at the university and the person giving the presentation was saying this program would make us very marketable, that hospitals would be looking for us before we even graduated, that we could name what we wanted for a salary. It was also stated that there are scholarships out there to make it financially easier and loan forgiveness programs that in 10 years would pay off our loans. I'm literally quoting what was said. When I've talked to a few BSN nurses in the field here, they've said it's tough to find a job. What do you all think?

Wile E Coyote, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical care.

Bsn to msn programs are intended for RN'S who already hold a bsn degree. To attend your program, you first need to become an RN.

MSN is generally intended as a non-direct patient care position such as educator, clinical leader, and (in conjunction with NP, CNS, CRNA, etc) advanced practice. It's certainly not going to exclude one from bedsde nursing, it is a large investment in money and time for someone new to the field.

Wile E Coyote, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical care.

Bsn to msn programs are intended for RN'S who already hold a bsn degree. To attend your program, you first need to become an RN.

MSN is generally intended as a non-direct patient care position such as educator, clinical leader, and (in conjunction with NP, CNS, CRNA, etc) advanced practice. It's certainly not going to exclude one from bedsde nursing, it is a large investment in money and time for someone new to the field.

I hold statements made by most school reps in the same regard as car salesmen and politicians. Now that you're a member, cruise the site and check out pagespages and pages of folks inquiring about a nursing career and of RN'S wishing to advance. (Your BSN to MSN crowd)

Wile E Coyote, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical care.

Im tired, i quoted my first post in error intending to edit it and add the 2nd paragraph...haha

First, it would be good to know if that MSN pertains to getting an NP license, once you're done with school, meaning no additional schooling needed. If you will not be becoming an NP, then I don't see the point of getting a BSN and MSN right away for most pathways, with exceptions being fields like management. To test that idea, I'd go online to several job websites if I were you and see what the requirements are for many of the nursing jobs in your area, especially the ones you are interested in. If you want find that you just need an BSN and/or RN, then you might be wasting your time. If you do need both degrees, you might want to consider a cheaper option.

You'll also want to look up what the starting salaries are for new grads. If you find that you're making around 40k AND you have a family, you're not paying off those student loans for a LONG TIME. And be honest on what your take home will be after taxes, family expenses will be, and how long it'll take to pay it off (payments with interest will build up dramatically over time). If you have an advanced degree, I'd see how much extra you'll make. If it's not that much extra (maybe an extra 5k), then maybe you should think about a different degree program.

Scholarship and loan forgiveness programs either generally will hardly dent the total cost and/or are extremely competitive and I wouldn't hold my breath. I would definitely search this site for NURSE Corps. loan repayment topics and see what type of people apply. I really could go on and on about the limited funding for someone with a bachelor's degree. But, just note, that I probably would not have the mentality that anyone or any organization will bail me out, if I accrued that sort of debt.

Edited by oldsockventriloquist

I just want to point out that a 100 000 loan in general is a bad idea unless you have the possibility of paying it off without problems. But once you are an adult and possibly have children this gets to be a problem for most people. You also have to pay for other costs like rent, food, and do on and forth.

My first child will start college this year (not nursing) and he got accepted to schools that would cost $ 50 000 a year, which would lead to significant debt, even though I would be able to pay more than half of it per year without problems. He decided against this school (although highly ranked) and go to a school that has a good reputation but less expensive. He does not want to end up with a giant loan and be stuck with it.

You do not know if you will get a job right away. It is not true that you can just say what you want to make and they will pay it. I am not sure how loan forgiveness works but I would be careful to believe something like that without further research.

Thanks so much Wylie. I have a sociology undergrad and masters degree. This particular program is for those with a bachelors degree in a non nursing field. So basically you get your BSN in one year then have 2-4 years to complete the masters program as an adult gerontology clinical nurse specialist.

thank you old sock ;) the masters degree is for "adult gerontology clinical nurse specialist." From what I've researched, in my state np = phd in nursing. That program is about 120,000.

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis.

CNS in some areas are still somewhat marketable. But read on here, falling, or have fallen, out of favor in most markets. And $100 grand is way to much

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

First of all, it is not even close to reasonable, counting that you may expect salary of about $100000/year WITH experience and IF you find a job.

Second, unlike NPs, nurse specialists are valued first and foremost for their knowledge of the system and people. Without considerable experience of working within that system, your MSN will be worthless.

Third.... I just cannot believe that in our time of ubiquitous WiFi connection someone still has an audacity to say such blatant lies. "You will ask for whatever salary you want" and "hospitals will stay in line for you" are just that - ridiculous, shameless lies. I would laugh my heart out if it were not so sad. A program presentation that stinks fishy to high heavens.

Wile E Coyote, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical care.

I'm still having difficulty with the program terminology of "BSN to MSN" while your description is that of direct-to-MSN in name.

I'll check back in to 2nd what Katie already typed. A CNS' value is in their CLINICAL experience. Clinical experience is gained through a very protracted clinical practicum/residency (This is theoretical, because I'm not aware that a program exists that would provide the thousands of hours required) or years of good ole on-the-job experience. My opinion that a newly minted CNS with only academic nursing experience would not be seen as effective and thus unhireable in an advanced practice position. You would much more likely end up starting in a direct- patient care position after spending $100k. Then, after gaining enough relevant experience, you would be seeking CNS positions with "Old" education.

To bluntly summarize, this sounds like a horrible way to enter nursing. Please share the name of this school/program if you care to. Perhaps there are details missing or misunderstood that could held legitimize the program and decrease what I feel is a very predatory sales pitch.

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