ABSN Programs

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by Eleanor Rocco Eleanor Rocco (New) New Pre-Student

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I am a rising senior at Fordham University and will obtain my BA (Business Admn.) in May 2022. I have a handful of ABSN programs that I plan on applying to. I am nervous I won’t get into any schools since I don’t have ample experience. I consider myself a well rounded student and person which is reflected on my resume. 

I am taking a phlebotomy course in the fall which will prepare me for the NPCE. I wanted to take a CNA course these past few months, but I have been taking classes… Fordham requires students to take Intro. Bio I and II and Gen. Chem I and II with lab in order to take A&P. I did well in all of those classes. I took them over the course of the Spring 2021 semester and Summer 2021 session. My GPA is a 3.6 but I plan on boosting it this Fall and Spring semester. I am taking human physiology in the Fall and anatomy in the Spring.  

I am also taking Microbiology through portage learning this August, but I am sure it will carry into the Fall semester which starts Sept. 1st. I feel like I am in the right direction and well prepared, but would greatly appreciate any advice people have. I understand how competitive ABSN programs typically are. Having a high GPA is imperative but I also want to strengthen my application in other ways such as  thoroughly articulating myself in the personal statements and getting some kind of experience.

Should I apply for the Fall 2022 and Spring 2023 semesters (each program is different)? Or is that too soon? Am I on the right track? I am worried about taking out outrageous loans and want to keep that on the back burner. I am not highly concerned because I know that I am motivated to pay them off, but it would be nice to keep them at a low cost. I could apply to an in state program, but I also care about trying a new environment and expanding my horizons.

Here is the semi-final list of schools I plan to apply to:

University of Miami, Duke University, GW, NYU, Columbia (MDE program), Medical University of SC, UCONN, MGH (Boston)

Is that too many schools, too little, just enough? Am I being too ambitious given my academic history and background? What does anyone recommend?

I am so looking forward to hearing back from this post. I am so passionate and driven to reach my goal. I am so eager to start a program and become immersed in a career that I strongly feel I have an aptitude for.

Thank you! 
Ellie

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience. 4,043 Posts

Find a low cost public university ABSN program. Going to a private university will rack up the student loan debt which will be difficult to pay back. If you want to "trying a new environment and expanding my horizons" then get your nursing degree, work for 2-3 yrs and then do travel nursing. You get plenty of new adventures and get paid well to have those experiences.

Eleanor Rocco

Eleanor Rocco

3 Posts

Thank you for the advice! Do you mean any 4 year university or specifically in state?

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience. 4,043 Posts

Preferably an in-state university. I graduated from an ABSN program at a state university. Tuition was $5k/ semester. My degree cost me a little over $20k. My niece graduated from an ABSN program from a private university and spent $16k in tuition/ semester ($64k total). We both graduated within a few months of each other.

Eleanor Rocco

Eleanor Rocco

3 Posts

Do you know of any public universities in the DC area, Boston area, Charleston, SC, Miami, FL or a major city on the East Coast that have a good ABSN program? I also have to consider the cost of living and budget that too, so the south appeals to me since it can get expensive in NY, Boston, and DC.

I have savings and help from my parents, but do have to make a significant contribution to expenses myself.

Also, do you recommend that I get more experience before I apply so that I have a stronger application? If I apply to a Fall 2022 semester or Spring 2023 semester, I will have that time to work (hopefully as a phlebotomist or CNA). But is that enough? I heard that people don’t necessarily need experience, but I personally want to and feel like it will confirm that I am committed to nursing.