GPA Requirements for Washington DC area schools? GPA Requirements for Washington DC area schools? - pg.2 | allnurses

GPA Requirements for Washington DC area schools? - page 2

I am applying to a BSN program as a transfer student, and I have applied to 5 schools in Washington DC area: Catholic University, George Mason, Marymount, Trinity, and Howard University. Based on... Read More

  1. Visit  Pokytrokyt profile page
    #13 0
    Like Georgetown, Marymount gets many more applicants than they can admit. So if you don't finish A&P and Chem before you apply, you'll be less well prepared than applicants who have already finished those pre-reqs.
  2. Visit  lilyann123 profile page
    #14 0
    I too, could use some advice. I am moving to the DC area in the next few months. I am currently a CNA with one year of nursing school completed at a community college and a 2 year Liberal Studies degree. I want to finish nursing school and am wondering if there are schools that will accept my first year nursing school credits? Should I go to a community college, or 4 year program? Would one be more willing than the other to admit me with any sort of advanced placement? Any advice on what and where would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
  3. Visit  Pokytrokyt profile page
    #15 0
    Quote from lilyann123
    Should I go to a community college, or 4 year program? Would one be more willing than the other to admit me with any sort of advanced placement? Any advice on what and where would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
    I think the answer depends on what kind of nursing you want to do after earning your RN. If you want to work in a DC/MD/VA hospital in either acute or critical care as a new grad nurse, you will almost absolutely have to have a BSN. I know local hospitals sometimes make a few exceptions. But they're exceptions: most of the hospital new grad hires are BSN prepared nurses. If on the other hand you'd rather work in a nursing home or doctor's office, an ADN might be good enough.

    The thing is, it's hard for new grad nurses in this area to get their first jobs. There's a lot of competition for those jobs. BSN prepared nurses have a leg up on the competition, in my opinion.

    You'll need to speak with the admissions department at each school to figure out what they will/won't accept for advance placement.

    Good luck!
  4. Visit  nurstudent12 profile page
    #16 0
    Does anyone have input about Trinity. I'm so torn and supposed to be starting in Jan.!! What are the classes like? If you do the day classes, are you in class all day? Is there a lot of different times you can choose from? Also, what is the lowest grade you can get in a class to pass to the next one? Also, does anyone live off campus and where?
  5. Visit  leenak profile page
    #17 0
    I've never heard of Trinity but if you are starting in January, don't you already have your class schedule?

    I can't speak for the specific college, but from what I've read about other nursing schools, your classes are in blocks and basically take most of the day if not all day. Clinical days can be longer and start earlier but again it would depend on the clinical. For classes, I've seen people say things like 7 to 1, 9 to 4, etc. As for grades, it seems almost universal that you need at least a C to pass but a C is generally a high C. Your best bet is to contact the school though to ask specific questions.
  6. Visit  student20122 profile page
    #18 0

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