LPN or Straight to RN

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    I am currently taking all online classes at TCC. I have 23 credits so far if I want to transfer to a four year university. I am a CNA and I want to pursue my dream. Nursing is want I have always wanted to do. I was going to shoot for LPN because I need to get into the workforce fast. But alot of nurses are telling me that's a waste of time. My mom said I should go straight for RN because that's my ultimate goal. I have researched MCI, Centura, JSR, VCU, and Virginia State. I know MCI is 15 months, but I am hearing that LPN's are goinjg to be phased out. Help please! I would like to know if there is anyone who can help me? At Tcc I am taking classes geared towards the associate in science degree so I can transfer to a four university. I am not good in math and that scares me. Some nurses at my job have told me go for RN because once you finish LPN school you get comfortable and never go back. With the recession going on I want to finish school and obtain my degree. I am a single parent, and I have to work fulltime. Alot of people have told me it best to not work while in nurising school, but that's not an option for me.
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  4. 8 Comments so far...

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    Hmm this a tricky & often heated debate. #1- my mom graduated nursing school in 1977 & back then there was talk of LPN's being "phased out". Its 2010, and LPNs are still out there Its all depends on the area, but some hospitals do not use LPNs ( I can think of a couple in DC that do however).There will still be a need for LPNs in LTC, assisted living, and home health. I too am a CNA(well GNA really, I'm in MD ) and a lot of the LPNs at my job tell me "No, just go for RN while you can" and some say "Go for it, it will benefit you in the long run". The choice is really difficult, but I think you should weigh the pros and cons. Both are great paths IMO & both will lead you to great careers as a nurse.
  6. 0
    That's a good question. As MiiszKimberlyCNA stated, I've heard of the idea of LPNs being phased out, but here in NYC, there are still a good number of hospitals that hire LPNs.

    I would also say to weigh the pros and cons. Compare the amount of time you'd need to dedicate for school, cost of schooling, employment opportunities post graduation etc. Do you have the time to complete an RN program (2 yrs ASN, 4 yrs BSN) vs and LPN program (15-18mos LPN)? Do you have the money for the program? I attended Hunter Bellevue which is a CUNY and got my BSN and as you know CUNYs are pretty affordable and I was able to graduate without loans. I have a cousin who went to NYU and got her BSN and she has loans to pay. I have yet another cousin who goes to an 18 mos LPN program and when he graduates he'll have to pay $20,000. Find out what hospitals around you still hire LPN's. Call human resources and speak to recruiters. Ask them about the employment prospects for both LPNs and RNs, because of course, with all the hard work, you'd like to have some yield. There is also a salary difference. Also consider job roles. LPNs and RNs have similar responsibilities but there are differences. If you go the LPN route, will you be able to balance work and school and go back to school for your RN degree? Is there room for career growth and educational advancement as an LPN vs RN?

    So, just do your research. Everyones situations and resources are different. If you can do LPN go for it, but if you can get your ASN or BSN, I'd definitely encourage you to.

    All the best.
  7. 0
    Good advice so far!

    It is harder to work full time and go to school and be a mom. Is there any way you could move back in with your parents, not work, have them help with your child and then go for the RN? My mom lived with us while I was getting my RN and I didn't work.

    I personally went from no medical background straight to RN at a local community college. I recently went back to school at an accelerated RN to BSN program.

    Good luck!
  8. 0
    I would like to thank everyone for posting a response to my question. I live in Richmond, VA and my parents are not here and it's not a option to live with my parents. I was thinking about working every weekend until i finish school. But I would not be able to spend time with my daughter, but I don't want to stop school because I have done so before. I am going to weigh the pros and cons and decide what path is best for me.
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    Good luck! If you do decide to do an LPN program, I suggest you do it at a community college. Sometimes if you do it a private school, the credits do not transfer..that is what some of the LPN's at my job have told me.
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    I just learned that. MCI here in Richmond is calling me every day trying to get me to attend their school. I have decided to stay enrolled in the community college. I live in Virginia and I attend all of classes online, but in my area there are some community colleges and I have applied to the college that serves my local area. I look forward to earning my nursing degree.
  11. 0
    LPN's are being phased out of critical care and step-down units here in my hospital this year. Enroll in a bridge program or you are transferred out... seems unfair to some of our LPN's who have 10-20 years' experience. All the more reason I am glad I opted for the RN program.
  12. 0
    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Good advice so far!

    It is harder to work full time and go to school and be a mom. Is there any way you could move back in with your parents, not work, have them help with your child and then go for the RN? My mom lived with us while I was getting my RN and I didn't work.

    I personally went from no medical background straight to RN at a local community college. I recently went back to school at an accelerated RN to BSN program.

    Good luck!
    Hi i know this convo happended a long time ago but im wondering what community college did you go to cause im looking for some schools that i can get into with no nursing experience.


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