Hiring outlook for ADN vs. BSN in your town? - page 8

by sugarmagnoliaRN

29,786 Views | 76 Comments

Hey y'all, I am wondering what the job outlook is like in your town for an ADN vs. a BSN. Are hospitals still as willing to hire ADNs? ADNs, how fast were you able to find work when you graduated? Where are y'all located? I am... Read More


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    SugarMagnolia, we meet again! I will be graduating before you join BHC's program, bummer. We did just find out last month that Texas Health resources hospitals are not hiring ADN's- that means no Presby. Like VitalSmiles suggessted, your best option for getting into one of those facilities (or any for that matter) is to get some experience as a tech, or even a volunteer in a hospital. Many hospitals hire techs, and a few offer nurse externships (like an internship during school). Baylor is starting to get pretty picky and they "say" they won't hire ADN's, but a friend of mine just graduated in May and was hired by them on the condition that she have her bachelors degree within 18 months. The issue with the ADN is that DFW hospitals are trying to gain magnet status. Magnet status is basically an elite status that hospitals acquire by meeting certain standards that go "above and beyond". One of those standards is having a ratio of advanced degree nurses, in this case Bachelor's and above. Magnet status means they get more federal money, and usually more patients, because they want to go to the best facilities. The debate of ADN vs BSN will continue, and in this economy either route will be just fine. You will be able to find a job as an ADN, though you may have to search outside of your desired specialty or radius. Experience, including grades in school is ultimately what gets you the job in DFW nowdays. And you live in Rowlett, right? You should look into TWU's online one year bachelor's program. The curriculum is strictly online, though you can opt for a partial-campus based program. There are two options for this: CCCCD (Collin County) has a new Higher Education Center and they host TWU classes, or you can attend TWU's nursing campus downtown adjacent to UTSouthwestern/parkland/Children's. I went there last summer for Patho and it was great! TWU is the least expensive university in north Texas for Nursing. I made the choice to go ADN so I can work and get experience for a year while I complete my bachelor's, then get a raise after a year of experience and completion of my degree. Also, most hospitals offer tuition reimbursement for you continuing your education. As far as El Centro getting clinicals at big hospitals, their campus is closer to many big hospitals. Schools tend to rotate in their area so they are not fighting each other for space. This semester BHC rotates through Methodist downtown, and in the fall we will have spots at Parkland for OB and psych. Like VitalSmiles said, network with the nurses that you learn from, and make all your clinicals a working interview. You never know who will remember you when you need them most...
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    Thanks Sweetpea!! You have been so helpful here and with all the Brookhaven info and I appreciate your insight!
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    I believe my hosptal in Garland is only hiring BSNs now.
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    Two classmates have talked to Med Ctr of Plano and Medical City recruiters. Both were were informed only BSN need apply for the upcoming internships.

    UTSW will still take 2 year RNs, as will Parkland, Methodist Richardson and Med Ctr of McKinney. Baylor, Presby/THR both say no to ADN as well from what I am seeing.

    There's going to be a pretty tight scramble for those internships that will accept ADN it sounds like.
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    I feel like most schools would not even still have existing federally and state funded ADN nursing programs if there was going to be a dramatic "by the year 2018" all hospitals are going to only hire BSN nurses.  That would be a total waste of government granted and federally financial aided money to people and with budgets, elections, and colleges showing legitimate funding reasons needed it would be a total hipocracy for then to suddenly say oh no only BSN nurses can work in hospitals.  There are not enough LTC facilities to support educating all the ADN nursing students, and the government okays the amount of medicare and medicaid bed facilities in a given area.  So it is not like the government is going to then turn around and say oh yeah all the money we funded for the education of ADN RN's will be supported by new jobs created by immediate federal and state funded nursing homes that are going to be approved and built by 2018.  So unless BSN's are wanted by the military for service, why would this huge rush of "only BSN's for all hospitals in the USA by a certain year" be true.  
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    Quote from blondbrownie
    I feel like most schools would not even still have existing federally and state funded ADN nursing programs if there was going to be a dramatic "by the year 2018" all hospitals are going to only hire BSN nurses.  That would be a total waste of government granted and federally financial aided money to people and with budgets, elections, and colleges showing legitimate funding reasons needed it would be a total hipocracy for then to suddenly say oh no only BSN nurses can work in hospitals.  There are not enough LTC facilities to support educating all the ADN nursing students, and the government okays the amount of medicare and medicaid bed facilities in a given area.  So it is not like the government is going to then turn around and say oh yeah all the money we funded for the education of ADN RN's will be supported by new jobs created by immediate federal and state funded nursing homes that are going to be approved and built by 2018.  So unless BSN's are wanted by the military for service, why would this huge rush of "only BSN's for all hospitals in the USA by a certain year" be true.  
    You may not think there are enough LTC facilities to justify educating ADN nurses, but nurses at those facilities are generally spread insanely thin. And I think ADN programs are still going to be around as the shift starts moving toward BSN-prepared nurses in hospitals, because getting an ADN and then bridging to a BSN is a lot more feasible for people on a budget. Also, I wasn't really asking if we all think that the government is going to somehow mandate that nurses in hospitals need to have a BSN, I was asking what the hiring looked like across the country for BSN vs. ADN. It varies widely by region, and as you can see in not.done.yet's post, it even varies within each city.
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    Personally, in the current hiring enviornment, I think anybody who is considering BSN vs ADN needs to go for a BSN. I know in my city, most of the major hospitals are BSN only, and even those that look at ADN's, only a small percent of new grads have an ADN.

    I just graduated with a BSN a couple months back and a large amount of people in my class are still searching for jobs. In addition, the people I've spoken to who graduated with ADN's in the last couple years mentioned how many of their classmates took months or even over a year to find a hospital job. A lot of them had to resort to working in a LTC facility while they waited. I've read San Antonio is a little more ADN friendly, but DFW and Houston is brutal right now even for BSN's.

    I think the extra pre-reqs and time are more than worth the better job prospects. If you can in any way make it work, go for the BSN.


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