Er Nurses Help! Report To Floor Admits.

  1. I am trying to see how other facilities get their admitted patients out of the e.c.c. after a room is assigned. Do you call report, fax, written report. How do you get around the delays. Administration of my facility want our e.c.c. patients out within 30 minutes of room assignment.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   neneRN
    We call report to the floors; if the accepting nurse is busy and can't take report, then we give report to their charge nurse. We used to have to wait until the nurse was able to call us back or came back from break or admitted a pt and on and on; other nurses never wanted to take report for their team members, and it seemed like it always took forever to get the pts out of the ER. Now being able to call report to the charge cuts all that out. We have a central transport system, so once report is called, we put in for transport on the computer and they arrive in 5-10 minutes to take the pt up.

    We are doing a trial of faxed reporting to one floor. We have a preprinted report sheet that we fill out and fax to the floor. The sheet is very well done; it is divided into sections for pt history, diagnostics done in ER, last VS/pain scale, meds given. Most common diseases are listed in the Hx section, so we just have to circle what's applicable. Same for diagnostics; there is a list of labs, Xrays, CTs, and we just circle what they've had done and only write down abnormal results. There's a section for IV/foley/NGT/O2, etc. as well and again we just circle what the pt has. The sheet only takes a minute or two to fill out, and both the ER and the floor seem to like it. We call the floor to let the unit secretary know when its faxed and immediately arrange transport. I've noticed that the pts are getting out even faster with the faxed reporting.
  4. by   tylernurse
    Thanks for your reply. We also are currently looking at a written report. Phoned reports have the ability to delay transport 2-3 hours, which is unacceptable the patients. Our administration is pushing this issue and this seems to be the new trend. We are considering attempt to call. If the nurse is busy, we will tube the written report to the floor and transport within 30 minutes.



    Quote from neneRN
    We call report to the floors; if the accepting nurse is busy and can't take report, then we give report to their charge nurse. We used to have to wait until the nurse was able to call us back or came back from break or admitted a pt and on and on; other nurses never wanted to take report for their team members, and it seemed like it always took forever to get the pts out of the ER. Now being able to call report to the charge cuts all that out. We have a central transport system, so once report is called, we put in for transport on the computer and they arrive in 5-10 minutes to take the pt up.

    We are doing a trial of faxed reporting to one floor. We have a preprinted report sheet that we fill out and fax to the floor. The sheet is very well done; it is divided into sections for pt history, diagnostics done in ER, last VS/pain scale, meds given. Most common diseases are listed in the Hx section, so we just have to circle what's applicable. Same for diagnostics; there is a list of labs, Xrays, CTs, and we just circle what they've had done and only write down abnormal results. There's a section for IV/foley/NGT/O2, etc. as well and again we just circle what the pt has. The sheet only takes a minute or two to fill out, and both the ER and the floor seem to like it. We call the floor to let the unit secretary know when its faxed and immediately arrange transport. I've noticed that the pts are getting out even faster with the faxed reporting.
  5. by   medicb70
    Our facility also uses a faxed report. Basic addmitting dx., treatment, near due meds and treatments, etc.. This is faxed to floor along with the admission orders. The floor nurse then has 15 min. to call with questions. After 15 min., the ER charge nurse calls the floor charge nurse (the charge nurses all carry dedicated phones) to let them know the patient is on the way. Works pretty good for us.

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