Work during school?

  1. So I've been accepted and now comes the question...do I try and work the 1-2 shifts per month or do I quit my job completely and focus only on school? My husband works and will make just enough to cover living expenses, but the extra income would definitely help. I like the people I work with but I'm very leary about spreading myself too thin. My husband told me to try it out and if I get too stressed to just quit. Any thoughts?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Tia
    I just graduated in December and most schools highly stress that you shouldn't work during the program. You are better off applying for loans to cover remaining expenses before you quit working to attend school and spending the small amount of spare time you have with your husband. Good luck with school and congrats on your acceptance!!

    Sincerely,

    Tia
  4. by   TLC RN
    Quote from UTRN2005
    So I've been accepted and now comes the question...do I try and work the 1-2 shifts per month or do I quit my job completely and focus only on school? My husband works and will make just enough to cover living expenses, but the extra income would definitely help. I like the people I work with but I'm very leary about spreading myself too thin. My husband told me to try it out and if I get too stressed to just quit. Any thoughts?
    Quit and focus on school.
  5. by   nurse_drumm
    hey there,

    i would highly recommend you work during school, especially if it's only for 1 or 2 shifts per month, and i'll tell you why... it gives you the extra money you may need to make life a little easier, and it will enable you to put what you're learning in school, into perspective. kind of like hands-on experience. i worked a minimum of 20 hours per week during school, and i must admit that it was too much. but, if you like what you already do, and it's only a couple of shifts per month, i say stay with it. if it gets to be too much, you'll still have the option to leave. give it a try...

    good luck!!
    ~alicia
  6. by   DIGNOUT
    Though most would say quit and focus on school, there are always a few on here that say they worked with no problem... The issue is for you to decide, however, and one must weigh the options: extra cash vs. time with the significant other/self/friends/dog/pet rat, etc.

    Is there an option for you to stay on as a PRNer? Perhaps talk to your Nurse Manager about staying on as a "once in a blue moon basis." Some managers may go for it.

    My advice? Rest and party the little bit of free time you have. If you do decide to work, do not commit to anything. The money thing will work itself out... always does.
  7. by   TexasGas
    Quote from nurse_drumm
    hey there,

    i would highly recommend you work during school, especially if it's only for 1 or 2 shifts per month, and i'll tell you why... it gives you the extra money you may need to make life a little easier, and it will enable you to put what you're learning in school, into perspective. kind of like hands-on experience. i worked a minimum of 20 hours per week during school, and i must admit that it was too much. but, if you like what you already do, and it's only a couple of shifts per month, i say stay with it. if it gets to be too much, you'll still have the option to leave. give it a try...

    good luck!!
    ~alicia
    i have to seriously disagree with some statements made in this post. what you will be learning in crna school will not give you any opportunity to gain "hands on experience" while picking up shifts. you've already worked as a unit nurse. that is not what crna school is about, nor will the texas bne or your school allow you to practice any anesthesia of any kind while not in the clinical residency setting. the writer of the above post comments on working 20hrs/week during school... that had to be rn school. that would be virtually impossible to log 20 hrs, on top of the 65 or so you will have dedicated to class and study.
    i was in your shoes a year ago, and i wondered if i should still hang on to prn work. i opted for the loans instead. i think i may have been able to slip in a shift or two per month, but that time has been invaluable to me to spend with family. i am glad there was not yet another time constraint placed upon me, for school has demanded much of me and of my family.
    i am still "listed" as prn for my last hospital but i have yet to work a shift since i started school.
    it is certainly for each person to decide, but let me recommend, that if you think you may need loans, get them before you stop working! your first year of loans are much easier to obtain if you are employed. for the next year, you use your spouse as a co-signer. the next year, you graduate.

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