What makes a good candidate

  1. Hello,

    I am wondering what makes a Nurse Anesthetist school applicant a strong candidate. I've heard that more than 3 years in ICU is good, but what else will help an applicant be chosen (ex- volunteering)?
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   Ruby Vee
    You have two different threads up -- are you interested in anesthesia, the nurse practitioner role or just anything that isn't bedside?
  4. by   jprn2018
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    You have two different threads up -- are you interested in anesthesia, the nurse practitioner role or just anything that isn't bedside?
    In a previous post I made, I stated that I was interested in becoming either a CRNA or a Surgical ACNP. I am so fascinated by the cardiac system, as well as anesthesia. I'm just trying to keep my options open, as I am not sure which path I am more interested in at the moment.
  5. by   Shanimal
    Take a moment to read through some of the posts on this forum. Pay attention to stats people post, whether they were good enough to get in, and if so, where. A little proactiveness on your part will go a long way--I promise you'll learn more reading through stuff already posted than from any response you receive here.
  6. by   ICUman
    High science and overall GPA
    Shadowing a CRNA as many hours as possible
    Leadership roles (charge nurse, preceptor, committees, etc.)
    High acuity ICU experience
    Longevity of ICU experience
    High GRE score
    Completion of graduate level courses with high level grades.
    CCRN certification
  7. by   jprn2018
    Quote from ICUman
    High science and overall GPA
    Shadowing a CRNA as many hours as possible
    Leadership roles (charge nurse, preceptor, committees, etc.)
    High acuity ICU experience
    Longevity of ICU experience
    High GRE score
    Completion of graduate level courses with high level grades.
    CCRN certification
    Thank you so much!
    When you say high acuity ICU, which ICU department do mean? CVICU, trauma ICU, or do you mean any ICU at a major hospital?
    Also, what graduate courses should CRNA applicants take?
  8. by   matcha-cat
    Quote from jprn2018
    In a previous post I made, I stated that I was interested in becoming either a CRNA or a Surgical ACNP. I am so fascinated by the cardiac system, as well as anesthesia. I'm just trying to keep my options open, as I am not sure which path I am more interested in at the moment.
    I'm like you, at the moment There are so many interesting paths to go down in nursing. I can't decide on one, just yet. And maybe it would be fun to jump around a bit? If you're able to
    Last edit by matcha-cat on Jul 17 : Reason: grammar
  9. by   HeartBreaker
    Level 1 Hospitals always look good. Several of the schools I'm interviewing too specially ask in their application is hospital a Level 1 or 2. CVICU is really good. I know someone with 2 years CVICU experience get into CRNA school and someone with 5 years Neuro ICU not get in. Both had similar GPA, GREs scores and both CCRN certified.

    Get your certifications. CCRN plus anything you get get in your area of expertise. Cardiac Sugery, Trauma, etc.

    As far as graduate course, biostastics is a prerequisite for some programs. Some MSN-CRNA will let you take Advanced Pharm and/or patho so those are always suggestions.
  10. by   jprn2018
    Quote from HeartBreaker
    Level 1 Hospitals always look good. Several of the schools I'm interviewing too specially ask in their application is hospital a Level 1 or 2. CVICU is really good. I know someone with 2 years CVICU experience get into CRNA school and someone with 5 years Neuro ICU not get in. Both had similar GPA, GREs scores and both CCRN certified.

    Get your certifications. CCRN plus anything you get get in your area of expertise. Cardiac Sugery, Trauma, etc.

    As far as graduate course, biostastics is a prerequisite for some programs. Some MSN-CRNA will let you take Advanced Pharm and/or patho so those are always suggestions.
    Is Trauma ICU experience as good as CVICU?
  11. by   JWOkStRN
    I think the CVICU vs other ICU = better experience arguments are bunk. There's more to it than just that. STATs do nothing but get you to interview. Your interview gets you selected. I'm a 5 year ICU nurse with Neuro/Trauma ICU experience and was accepted to CRNA school. I'm a firm believer that they look at more than pure numbers. It's a comprehensive package. Just my two cents.
  12. by   jprn2018
    Quote from JWOkStRN
    I think the CVICU vs other ICU = better experience arguments are bunk. There's more to it than just that. STATs do nothing but get you to interview. Your interview gets you selected. I'm a 5 year ICU nurse with Neuro/Trauma ICU experience and was accepted to CRNA school. I'm a firm believer that they look at more than pure numbers. It's a comprehensive package. Just my two cents.
    Is the interview similar to a job interview?
  13. by   JWOkStRN
    Quote from jprn2018
    Is the interview similar to a job interview?
    It was unlike any other interview I've done. Mine was a mix of "getting to know you" and clinical assessment. To me, there was more at stake with my graduate school interview than a job interview. Hope that makes sense.
    Last edit by JWOkStRN on Jul 19
  14. by   Onmyway110>
    My class actually has 4 Pediatric ICU nurses, so I would choose whichever ICU that interests you more. The acuity on your unit matters more than the type of ICU, but yes in general CVICU & CTSICU offers the best experience. You should try to work on a unit that has very sick patients on supportive devices (vents/crrt/lvad/balloon pump), invasive monitoring (arterial/swanz) or noninvasive monitoring (ev1000), vasoactive medications (levo, neo, epi, nitro, Cardizem). These patients typically have at least 1 or more organ failing, septic or otherwise hemodynamically unstable d/t a variety of pathologies. When you become the person on the unit others look to for answers, then you are ready to apply to CRNA programs. That may at the 1 year ICU mark, which is required for most programs, though that is highly unlikely. Either way, don't cheat yourself or your future patients by leaving the ICU before you are ready.

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