What is CRNA school like?

  1. So I am about to finish my ADN and was planning on blitzing through my BSN (I already have a bachelors so it's only like 28 credits) while working and then applying to CRNA school. I was hoping to get in before the doctorate cut off. I went into nursing planning on becoming a CRNA from the beginning. I shadow at the hospital I work at with the CRNA's pretty regularly and I am a 4.0 so far. The problem is I hate nursing school, like I am miserable every day because of the extra stuff they add on. Such as papers about how important holistic medicine is, or interviewing local seniors to write papers about what cultural groups they identify with.

    So my question to you guys is, what is CNRA school like? Is it more hard science and skill's based (Like I would imagine PA or MD school would be like) or is it more like nursing school where we spend a very large chunk of time learning that we should be using guided imagery instead of pharmaceuticals to manage pain.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   loveanesthesia
    If I was you, I'd skip the BSN and go for a DNAP program. You don't need a BSN if you have a bachelor degree for the DNAPs and you'll be glad to have the doctoral degree. And yes there will be papers-MDs also have the requirements to consider patients' psychosocial dimension.
  4. by   Nuru
    Do you know any schools that do a DNAP without a BSN. All the ones in MN require a BSN specifically. I do have another degree but it's in marketing.
  5. by   JWOkStRN
    I was accepted to a DNAP program with a BA in Political Science and an ADN. I had a large amount of science classes bc I was premed for my second BS I didn't finish. So, there are options out there. FIU, TCU, Middle Tennessee, Webster. Continue to check each school website to verify current requirements. I know as I began applying, some schools that were on my list had updated their requirements to BSN only. Hope that helps.
  6. by   ORRN4345
    Google DNAP CRNA and you'll find options. You can also go to CRNA School Search.
  7. by   dread_pirate_roberts
    CRNA school is science. It's heavy on physics, pharmacology, chemistry, clinicals etc... but it is also heavy on professionalism (>90% of CRNAs are members of AANA) and a holistic view of your patient with certain required base courses like advanced health assessment and nursing theories. Don't forget, when you're a CRNA you are still an RN, and part of what sets us apart from MDs is our view of the patient as a whole, rather than their disease. You will learn about psychosocial and cultural factors not because they are "fluff" or "add-ons," but because they are actually pertinent to the patient that lays in front of you on that table and relies on you to maintain all the functions they're giving up to have surgery. Good luck in your journey!
  8. by   jj224
    Quote from dread_pirate_roberts
    CRNA school is science. It's heavy on physics, pharmacology, chemistry, clinicals etc... but it is also heavy on professionalism (>90% of CRNAs are members of AANA) and a holistic view of your patient with certain required base courses like advanced health assessment and nursing theories. Don't forget, when you're a CRNA you are still an RN, and part of what sets us apart from MDs is our view of the patient as a whole, rather than their disease. You will learn about psychosocial and cultural factors not because they are "fluff" or "add-ons," but because they are actually pertinent to the patient that lays in front of you on that table and relies on you to maintain all the functions they're giving up to have surgery. Good luck in your journey!
    I hate when I see that nurses are the only ones that view the patient as a whole. What does that even mean?
  9. by   dread_pirate_roberts
    Quote from jj224
    I hate when I see that nurses are the only ones that view the patient as a whole. What does that even mean?
    JJ, you're right. That might be a little bit of an extreme way to say it, but in general nursing curriculum focuses on the patient in a holistic manner, whereas medical school curriculum focuses on cellular level processes and diagnosis, etc. Obviously this thread is about CRNA school, so it does get way more into the science/diagnosis/decision-making than undergrad, but I still do think the worldview is different between MDs and APRNs. I am always willing to be proven wrong - how do you view it?

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