SRNA's: Study Schedules, Sleep, Sanity? - page 2

Current and past SRNA's: I'm starting my education this fall, and would like to hear from SRNA's on how they are managing their time and what works for them to keep their balance and sanity... Read More

  1. by   loisane
    Quote from atainey
    I have a sincere question, please don't take this as a poke at SRNA's or the posts thus far.... My husband spends 8-12 hours a day just on undergraduate studies, and while I know being an SRNA will be more intensive, he won't have the added pressure of employment added to it like he does now. Doesn't that make up the difference?

    I believe your question is sincere. Please believe me, that my answer is sincere.

    You express an attitude/opinion that I have seen get SRNAs in serious trouble. They think "I'm a good student, I never had to study much, if I just go to class, and pay attention I'll be fine. Maybe read a little, no big deal, that is always how it has worked for me".

    It doesn't take too long for these people to get hit with a serious reality shock. And they are truly dazed. They have never been challenged to this extent before. If it takes them too long to recover, and figure out a revised plan, they are in serious trouble.

    The posts here are no exaggeration. I have not been to medical or law school, but anesthesia school is most definitely the hardest thing I have ever done.

    loisane crna
  2. by   Sherpa RN
    Hey Guys, What happened to the original Question of the thread? SRNA's out there and CRNA's, what study schedules made you successful and which one made you crazy. What suggestions would you give to help someone not be institutionalized while in school, especially that first year w/ semi-front loaded programs? atainey's question was not really on topic and seemed to have steered us off course. Again, out of the gravel and onto the road. What do SRNA's find works best for studying and keeping their sanity?
  3. by   deepz
    Quote from Sherpa RN
    Hey Guys, What happened to the original Question of the thread? SRNA's out there and CRNA's, what study schedules made you successful and which one made you crazy. What suggestions would you give to help someone not be institutionalized while in school.........

    Take it one day at a time.

    Plan ahead, yes; prepare yourself mentally, yes; but don't borrow trouble from the future.

    Stewing about it now is counterproductive.
  4. by   alansmith52
    ohhh... grr. never mind I'll just keep it to my self :imbar
    Last edit by alansmith52 on Apr 21, '04
  5. by   JoJozay
    Is this what the grading is in most CRNA classes?


    [QUOTE=nilepoc]in a word "No". Does your husband fail out if he gets a grade less than an 83? We were required to take pathophysiology from the med school where I attend. While the med students took the same exams we did, they did not have to perform as well. They were allowed to pass, if they were within two standard deviations of the mean. We were only allowed to pass if we scored greater than 83% on a non curved scale. This was a 5 credit hour class, with three exams. During the same semester, I was enrolled in 12 additional credit hours, with similar requirements. [QUOTE]
  6. by   athomas91
    yep - you drop below a B average and you are outta there - it is not fun w/ that hanging over your head.
  7. by   NCgirl
    Yeah, 92 for A, 83 for B, must maintain 3.0 GPA. Make more than two C's (even if your GPA is 3.5), and you're out. NA school is not very forgiving.
  8. by   CRNA, DNSc
    Wow you can get a C in your program!!! Get even one C, in a lot of programs, you are HISTORY-this is graduate level- C's are not acceptable.
  9. by   NCgirl
    It's interesting how programs vary so much. All three schools I interviewed at allowed either one or 2 C's (which was like 76-82), but of course you still had to keep a 3.0 GPA. I wonder if there's any kind of statistical difference in rates of passing boards and the kind of grades a program requires to make it through. I'm not worried at all about my program....100% pass rate for the past ten years. How are the rest of you guys grading scales and progression requirements?
  10. by   alansmith52
    most of them boast a 100% pass rate. but that is not an average of people who got it. that number comes from people who make it through and consequently pass the board. yeah no C's here. or at least I think anyone who got a C will be here next year.
    in away this 100% board passing statistic is kinda like the stats of deaths in the OR or ER. you know how they run the patient over to the ICU for them to die rather than die in the OR so they can keep there stats up. well... in a really twisted way its the same kind of deal. would you go to a shool who boasts an 87% pass rate or a 100 pass rate. right... so of course you make the stat what you want it to be.. like research.
    like all those thousands of hospitals that belong to the top 100 hosptials club. top 100 in what?

    right well this one is in the top 100 that keeps there patients water full. and that one is in the top 100 with flat parking lots. lol you get the picture> and this one is in the top ten with signs that can be seen from the freeway.. (my favorite) I find thier patient care to be top notch



    Quote from NCgirl
    It's interesting how programs vary so much. All three schools I interviewed at allowed either one or 2 C's (which was like 76-82), but of course you still had to keep a 3.0 GPA. I wonder if there's any kind of statistical difference in rates of passing boards and the kind of grades a program requires to make it through. I'm not worried at all about my program....100% pass rate for the past ten years. How are the rest of you guys grading scales and progression requirements?
  11. by   NCgirl
    C students ultimately won't make it through anesthesia school. Yeah, a program may allow a C in coursework, but I can't see someone making it through clinical, getting pimped, after making a C. If you don't learn it, doing cases proficiently is impossible. And for clarification, my program doesn't allow C's in anesthesia classes. But they'll let one slide in the theory, research, policy BS. And if anyone who can get into anesthesia school gets a C in one of those, then I don't know what's going on.
  12. by   jbro
    can make a "C" during the first semester, none after that, and must have a 3.0 to get into the summer semesters
  13. by   Athlein1
    Here are some tidbits of advice for that first year. I will add more as I think of them. Brain reserves are low at present...it's been a LONG semester.

    Honing your time management skills is the single best piece of advice I can give you. Take this from someone who is commuting 2-3 hours per day for class depending on traffic. Begin thinking of ways to save time in everyday activities that you still have to do while you are a student.

    A close second for best advice is to make sure you do not stop doing something that you enjoy. You will have to make sacrifices, sure, and you will learn that re-prioritizing your life is just a part of life as an SRNA, but we all need our outlets for stress and rewards for our efforts. Whether you are into sports, travel, your family, movies, basketweaving - whatever. You cannot stop everything in your life for school. You just need to learn to make wise choices about when to enjoy those things. And do not be apologetic or guilty about taking time for you. It is crucial to the maintenance of your sanity.

    Here are some other thoughts about that first year...

    1. Pre-read. Reading the material before a lecture, even if it is only a quick skim, will make the lecture more worthwhile - the subject material won't be so foreign.
    2. Study for a little bit every day rather than attempting to cram. It's so easy to get behind, and once you fall off the horse, it can be very, very difficult to get back on. That horse will buck you off in a heartbeat!
    3. Don't get behind. A little less sleep on a couple of nights is far less painful than running out of time and performing poorly on an exam.
    4. If you do have to cram, do not study up until the very last moment of the exam. It will only add additional pressure to your already overburdened brain. Take a half-hour before the exam to rest your noggin and re-focus.
    5. Buy the books you need ahead of time. Don't wait until the semester is halfway over to decide that you should have bought that text after your grades are not what you might want them to be. Most schools will send out booklists, and instructors will include required readings in their syllabi. Do not think you are saving money by skimping on texts. The students who don't have the books they need are often left to wonder what they are missing.
    6. Get organized and stay that way. You will likely get volumes of handouts. Anesthesia programs are doing their part to decimate the rainforests, let me tell you. The sheer volume of paper can be overwhelming. So, take the time to devise a system that is going to work for you (be it by systems, by class, by topic...). Also, round-file the handouts that do not add to your knowledge or repeat information present in textbooks. Doing so will decrease information overload.
    7. Invest in a decent computer. If you have a slow clunker, buck up and buy a new one.
    8. If you are going to use a PDA, start fiddling with it ahead of time. You will have enough to do without having to learn how one of these things works. I am PDA-less because I didn't do this, and now I am too busy to sit down and deal with it.
    9. Before you start school, make a "Reasons-why-I-want-to-do-this" list. Keep it around and review it whenever your spirits or your motivation are running low. It sounds hokey, but there will be times when you need to remind yourself why you are doing this.
    10. Have a heart-to-heart with your family, SO, spouse, etc. before school starts. Keep open the lines of communication while you are in school. But, be honest about the level of commitment and time that this goal will demand. This is a group effort, really. Do a search for other threads about this topic.
    11. Get your financial house in order. We've talked about this on this site before, too. Create a realistic financial plan. Figure out how you are going to pay for this education. You will not have time to devote to this once school starts.
    12. Keep a good attitude. And, if you can't keep a good attitude, keep it to yourself. You know the saying, "a few bad apples can ruin the barrel?". Don't be one of those apples. It just brings down the morale of the class. And it ticks off the faculty, too.

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