Reasons NOT to be CRNA - page 6

Hello everyone, I'm a student nurse in a BSN program in florida. I heard about CRNAs shortly after I decided to purse a nursing career. I thought I had my mind set on being a CRNA. However, so far... Read More

  1. by   suzanne4
    And my final comment on the topic:

    Guess that I trained back in the day when you treated your patient as you would want to be treated, or would expect that your family members were treated like. Still stick by what I have done and will continue to do.
    Last edit by Joe V on Feb 9, '17
  2. by   camoflage
    Quote from suzanne4
    I worked OR for about 20 years, and in many of the facilities it actually has been the responsibility of the CRNA for placement of the patient, padding of the arms and shoulders, etc. And I am still sticking by what I have said. And it states right in the charting of the OR nurse, that positioning was done by the CRNA or anesthesia team.

    In some facilities it is a joint effort, but the CRNA is always going to be involved one way or another, and the CRNA role does not excuse them from moving the patient after the procedure to the gurney, or bed, etc. Being a CRNA still included physically moving and lifting, not the job for someone that has back issues.
    The CRNA does check positioning but the when moving a patient, the CRNA's responsibility is at the head of the bed, that is the bottom line..... your scenario is not the norm... you can argue all you want to try and save face but the the reality is not what you describe.

    Sorry, but that is just the way it is, I have been in nursing just as long (if not longer.. FYI)
  3. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from lizz
    .....
    The title of the thread is: Reasons NOT to be a CRNA. There are upsides and downsides to every career path so, I'm not sure why it's wrong to consider the downside when becoming CRNA is such a big financial investment.

    You also seem to be forgetting that I've agreed with you that it's probably worth it in the long run. But, again, for my particular situation, it would take quite awhile to recoup the lost income and debt.

    :typing
    I do not think it is wrong to consider the down side of being a CRNA. And there definitely ARE downsides, as there are with EVERY job. If one claims that there aren't any downsides, they are delusional, in the extreme minority, or just plain lying.

    To me it makes no sense to go into "nursing" and then becoming a CRNA where your patient is mostly asleep. (but that is just my personal opinion)

    I'm facing this same issue with just going to grad school to be ACNP. You figure the cost of education (estimated by school at $88K over 2 years) plus the ~ $100K I won't be making in income over those two years, and it equals $188K for education. Is that worth it? I honestly don't know. Am I really $188K miserable in my current position? I don't know.

    If I decide not to pursue ACNP, that cost above will be the precise reason.

    I don't know if you have the opportunity to shadow any CRNA's, but that would be my suggestion. You can then see for yourself what is good and bad about it. No one can tell you if this is right FOR YOU. It will be right for some, and not right for others.
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from mvanz9999
    I'm facing this same issue with just going to grad school to be ACNP. You figure the cost of education (estimated by school at $88K over 2 years) plus the ~ $100K I won't be making in income over those two years, and it equals $188K for education. Is that worth it? I honestly don't know. Am I really $188K miserable in my current position? I don't know.

    If I decide not to pursue ACNP, that cost above will be the precise reason.
    This is exactly my point. I'm also looking at NP and, believe me, I will be doing the exact same cost/benefit analysis. It has nothing to do with discriminating against CRNA or any other career path ... and everything to do with whether or not it's a prudent investment.

    :typing
  5. by   London88
    Suzanne4;

    It is everybody's responsibility for positioning and not just anesthesia's responsibility. I do not position any pt without the surgeon in the room especially for positions other than supine. Granted I will make a final check to make sure the pt is in good alignment , however my notes always state that pt postioned by OR team and surgeon, and as stated to you above during positioning the CRNA's role is to manage the airway and the others in the room manage everything else.
  6. by   coopsc1
    Camoflage; are you a CRNA in the Denver area? I see that you do not want to recieve emails. I live in Denver and I am looking to talk with a CRNA in this area. You can send me an email or private message, thanks a lot

    SC
  7. by   rebecca78
    I have heard from so many people in school and at my work that they want to be a CRNA because they make GREAT money. No job is worth it if you don't have the heart or passion for it. I stumbled into wanting to be a CRNA two ways. The first was a good experience at a bad time. When my father passed away suddenly during surgery the CRNA on his case stayed with my mom until I could make it to the hospital and consoled my mom, which she did not have to do. The second way that I came about wanting to become a CRNA was examining what setting I wanted to work in when I finish nursing school. I love the ICU and the monitoring, procedures and need for constant learning. I wanted to see where I could go from there and evolve my patient care, that is when I stumbled upon a position that I had seen in my hospital all along. I shadowed a CRNA at work and was hooked. I did the research and I will be pursuing my BSN after I graduate so that I can apply to anesthesia school
  8. by   ssrhythm
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Thanks Brian.

    ApaisRN - you are right. However, most APN's have a much higher stress level than a staff nurse.
    IDK. While I'm still a student, I'd say that the stress is just different. For example, if I were a floor nurse with 10-12 patients and lacked the time and resources to take care of each like each deserves, I'd be more stressed than being in a situation in the OR where poop is hitting the fan with the resources available to deal with it. Yes, the stress is more constant, but to me that is less stressful than getting too comfy, bored, or in too much of a routine where a mistake is more likely to happen. Does that make any sense?

    To answer the OPs request for not-so-great-aspects of... I can only speak to the student aspect. Studying for the GRE and taking it pretty much stink. Studying/preparing for a standardized test that is basically 7th-10th grade math thrown at you in ways meant to confuse combined with super-neat vocabulary that you will vow to use but never will all thrown on you with a time limit...well, I can't think of much worse. That said, bust your butt and kill it, because a great score is very beneficial. An OK score is OK and won't hurt you, but a great score is big. Interviewing with a group of folks you don't know about something you are so passionate about is great because you got an interview, but it is awful because it is nerve-racking. I'm weird, because I really dig studying, but most people think spending 18 hours/day studying during the didactic portion of school and spending every waking moment of the weekends studying just to catch up or stay on top of the material sucks. Being unsure of yourself in clinical and learning an intense amount of new things from many people who do everything slightly differently is intimidating and can be "bad" at times. Sleep deprivation bites no matter how you slice it.

    With all of that said, I am absolutely LOVING school and all that goes with it. There are ups and downs, but for the most part, everyone is trying to help. Your professors want you to succeed; the CRNAs want you to succeed; the anesthesiologists want you to succeed. You will get constructive criticism, and when you take it and learn from it, you do things better and all is good. Classes will push you, and you will learn and succeed. Stress will freak you out, and you will deal with it and do well; the feeling that results is fantastic. Yes, you will run into some folks having a bad day and take unjustified grief, but you will not escape that with any profession you choose.

    Good luck with whatever you choose to do, but I can honestly say that there is NO other job in the world that I'd rather have; I just wish I'd realized that this is what God put me here for much earlier in life.
    Last edit by Joe V on Feb 9, '17
  9. by   EMac
    Man, SSrythm....I've been researching nursing for a year, and CRNA for a few months. I am a 38 year old career changer and your post is exactly what I want to hear. There is good and bad in whatever profession you choose. If you can handle that, you'll be fine. I just wish I'd started sooner.

    I am beginning my nursing education in August with an Associate's Degree, then moving to an RN-BSN then hopefully to a CRNA school. Although it is many years away, I am wondering if there are any resources (i.e. textbooks) or otherwise that deal with certain aspects of anesthesiology that I can begin to read in my spare time? I am sure the profession is ever evolving, but any regular reading would be helpful.

    Advice?
  10. by   subee
    Quote from EMac
    Man, SSrythm....I've been researching nursing for a year, and CRNA for a few months. I am a 38 year old career changer and your post is exactly what I want to hear. There is good and bad in whatever profession you choose. If you can handle that, you'll be fine. I just wish I'd started sooner.

    I am beginning my nursing education in August with an Associate's Degree, then moving to an RN-BSN then hopefully to a CRNA school. Although it is many years away, I am wondering if there are any resources (i.e. textbooks) or otherwise that deal with certain aspects of anesthesiology that I can begin to read in my spare time? I am sure the profession is ever evolving, but any regular reading would be helpful.

    Advice?
    Don't think about it now. You have many YEARS ahead of you before you can even apply. Just concentrate on being a good nurse and pay close attention to respiratory and cardiac physiology - get your degrees and several years of ICU experience.
  11. by   Free-heeler
    Hey Mark- I see you're both a CRNA and a Firefighter/Paramedic. I was just curious how you find time for it all? Are you a volunteer or career firefighter. I am just a newbee nurse, but have also thought about firefighting. Thanks for the info.
  12. by   tahoe77
    Quote from Alpha13
    To say the least your numbers are a bit slanted.

    Are you talking about becoming a travel nurse for that $100k/year figure as a regular RN? Because if not, I don't see how you would make only 55-60% of other RN jobs as an ICU nurse. In So Cal. ICU pays the same as any other field.

    As for using $120k as the salary for CRNAs, first of all this is on the lower end of the pay scale. Second, obviously this figure is not static and will rise quickly as CRNA gains experience.

    More accurate figures would be something like this:

    New grad ICU RN salary: ~65k-75k from year 1, up to 90k on year 5.
    CRNA school costs: 100k/2 years
    New grad CRNA salary: $130k from year 1, $140k-$150k from year 3.

    If a new CRNA was to pay off his debt as quickly as possible, he'd catch up to the regular RN in about 2 years. But numbers don't tell the whole story. The CRNA has vastly greater earnings potential than the RN, enough so that he's gone from "decent middle class bloke" to "upper middle class yuppie." If he's smart with his finances and career prospects, he can go even higher. The RN has very little upward potential in comparison. Sure, he can move into traveling or management, but that's about it.

    Honestly there's no comparison here in terms of earnings potential.

    I know this post was several years ago but I want to tell you that as a new
    grad in the ICU in 2008 I made 99,000 in the bay area. the next year in
    the icu I made 128,000 working OT maybe once a month.

    So actually your numbers are way off.
  13. by   nomadcrna
    Numbers are way, way off.
    I've not made less than 200k since 1999(as a CRNA).

    Quote from tahoe77
    I know this post was several years ago but I want to tell you that as a new
    grad in the ICU in 2008 I made 99,000 in the bay area. the next year in
    the icu I made 128,000 working OT maybe once a month.

    So actually your numbers are way off.

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