Nursing Experience for CRNA school

  1. So honestly I am just venting with this post. There is a nurse in my hospital that just got into a good CRNA program in the area and has been a nurse since January. The app deadline was in September so he applied with 8 months of experience. He took his CCRN sometime this year as well. Kicker-his mother is a CRNA in the area. I just think it is terribly unethical that he got into school and it's disheartening to think that they would turn down people with lots of valuable experience for this person.
    I got into school this year, but I did so based off merit and meeting all of the requirements that these schools have for applicants. Not to mention, after multiple rejections to other schools within the past 1 1/2 years. Maybe that's why I find it especially gear-grinding.
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  2. 26 Comments

  3. by   ICUman
    Agreed.
    Was just talking to a CRNA this morning about how we both feel 1 year of experience minimum is inadequate.
    And we know that guy likely got in due to connections his mother has in the area. I would be annoyed too.

    People without "connections" put in a lot of hard work and effort to be accepted in anesthesia programs, and it's frustrating to see situations like this where they appear to seamlessly get in just because they know the right people.
  4. by   m1lkofamnesia
    I don't know this person, but this is extremely odd if he's truly only been a nurse for 11 months. IF he's only been a nurse since January, how was he able to take the CCRN already...? Uhhh...in order to take it you must had 1,750 hours of patient care. Either this person worked crazy OT or falsified the requirements and verification process to take the CCRN...yikes. *scratches head* See 3rd question for reference: https://www.aacn.org/certification/g...sked-questions
  5. by   nurserobinson281988
    Quote from m1lkofamnesia
    I don't know this person, but this is extremely odd if he's truly only been a nurse for 11 months. IF he's only been a nurse since January, how was he able to take the CCRN already...? Uhhh...in order to take it you must had 1,750 hours of patient care. Either this person worked crazy OT or falsified the requirements and verification process to take the CCRN...yikes. *scratches head* See 3rd question for reference: https://www.aacn.org/certification/g...sked-questions
    So in theory this is true. They audit some people, but the majority of people are held at their word about their clinical hours.
  6. by   Rico713
    A lot of schools you just need a year experience in adult icu by the time you matriculate and not when you apply. Second, the whole not enough experience is not a good argument because what you learn in crna school changes your whole thinking compared to what you did in the icu. Plenty of crnas I've talked to said it's learning everything all over again so that experience means only a little bit. That's the same argument people think you should be a nurse for a year before going into the icu. That doesn't hold up either it all depends on the person, their drive, and ability. I didn't take the ccrn in 8 months but i had the hours in at 10 months because of OT. Why be frustrated about someone else's situation that you honestly don't know all the information about? You are in school now and you are your own competition not anyone else.
  7. by   JWOkStRN
    Quote from Rico713
    A lot of schools you just need a year experience in adult icu by the time you matriculate and not when you apply. Second, the whole not enough experience is not a good argument because what you learn in crna school changes your whole thinking compared to what you did in the icu. Plenty of crnas I've talked to said it's learning everything all over again so that experience means only a little bit. That's the same argument people think you should be a nurse for a year before going into the icu. That doesn't hold up either it all depends on the person, their drive, and ability. I didn't take the ccrn in 8 months but i had the hours in at 10 months because of OT. Why be frustrated about someone else's situation that you honestly don't know all the information about? You are in school now and you are your own competition not anyone else.
    While I respect your opinion, I too, feel that one year of ICU experience is hardly enough to understand how to care for the crashing patient appropriately. At one year you are just figuring out how to be an ICU nurse and starting to learn critical thinking skills, as well as feeling confident as a nurse. Nurses at one year are still very task oriented and are just scratching the surface and the how and why of pathophys. Academically speaking it may not make a difference, but clinically...the difference is enormous. There are plenty of CRNAs that I've spoke with that agree that the less experienced ICU nurses are the ones that struggle the hardest in residency. Not saying everyone does, but generally speaking. Why not stay in the ICU a little longer, master critical skills that you will need as a CRNA then press on? Too many nurses are using the ICU as only a "stepping stone" without fully reaping the benefits that being bedside for longer than a year truly offers. One of those benefits...knowing that you're putting your patient above your ego. With that being said, this is only my opinion and it means diddly squat to others, but I felt the need to share my 2 cents.
  8. by   nurserobinson281988
    I am frustrated that while the rest of us are jumping through all of these hoops, there are others just sliding underneath them with the help of nepotism. The requirements on the website for the school in question state that "all requirements must be met prior to submission of the application packet." My frustration is due to the fact that I know people who did not get in this year who are amazing nurses with tons of experience but who dont have the connections that this particular nurse has. My frustrations is with the admissions board that allowed this to happen. I don't care how much drive he has, ability, etc.—he does not meet the actual requirements that the program put in place. So while most of us waited the year that was required, he did not.
    Aside from that, there is something to be said for experience. A lot to be said for it, actually. If ICU experience is no big deal, maybe they should take it off the requirements list completely!
    Last edit by nurserobinson281988 on Nov 9
  9. by   ICUman
    Quote from Rico713
    the whole not enough experience is not a good argument because what you learn in crna school changes your whole thinking compared to what you did in the icu. Plenty of crnas I've talked to said it's learning everything all over again so that experience means only a little bit.
    Really, because the CRNA's I've spoken with have told me that experience matters quite a bit. While nurses that are admitted with 1 year experience may excel academically, they struggle and are unsure of the proper interventions to take when placed in clinical scenarios.

    Yes anesthesia curriculum is much more advanced and different than nursing school. But a proper foundation in the ICU is important. It does no one favors to skimp on experience.
  10. by   Rico713
    One year recovering hearts to me for a person with the right attitude is enough. In my unit we still use swans alot so you get a great foundation with hemodynamics and we are a top 100 becker cardiac program and top 50 truven cardiac program. Now if someone only has a year of medical icu or what not that does not deal with hemodynamics as much then its probably not enough. Id say its the quality of icu experience not neccessarily the amount of years that matter because some people work in an icu in smaller hospitals but their pts are like our step down pts
  11. by   ICUman
    Quote from Rico713
    Id say its the quality of icu experience not neccessarily the amount of years that matter
    So now you're saying that experience *does* matter when it comes to anesthesia training? Thought you said it didn't matter.
  12. by   Rico713
    The statement was made saying one year is not enough and i made the statement that argument is not true...because one year can be enough with the right quality
  13. by   JWOkStRN
    Just because someone is not recovering hearts and working in a MICU/STICU or what have you, does not mean they are not dealing with hemodynamics. Quality does make a difference per say on what and how much you learn, but at one year you're still green. Period. Think about it, at least the first three months in the ICU you're in orientation. That leaves you 9 months on your own...hardly enough to hone clinical skills. That's just how I feel though. I encourage all my younger nurses who want to track into CRNA to put in at least two years before applying. That way you have 3 years under your belt prior to matriculation. Hell I waited 5 years and will have 6.5 before I start in-residence didactics. I am thankful for waiting and being a very seasoned nurse. Just my humble opinion.
  14. by   Rico713
    Ok well AA's in a ACT model do everything a crna does without having to have experience prior to matriculation. Not sticking up for them but just stating a fact. I was just getting at just because someone only has a year experience one shouldnt say they are not ready without working with then and witnessing the skills they have. By 1 year i had my ccrn, at a year my csc, and started precepting experienced nurses on open hearts and other surgical pts. In that year i did have 4 months of residency and then started hearts right away. Like i said im at a top program too. I dont precept because of a lack of people that want to either but because the confidence management has and respect from my peers. Ive had numerous upper management tell me they would write me reccommendations for school in a heartbeat. This isnt to toot my own horn but to give an example there are others that are doing everything im doing as fast as i have also snd probably smarter but should we wait because what others feel everyone should do? This is like what i heard coming out if nursing school that you should get a year exp then go to the icu blah blah blah. Ive seen numerous experienced nurses come to my unit and struggle with the most basic icu tasks and thought processes. So how much did that previous experience help them? I appreciate everyones opinion just trying to give you a viewpoint from the other side of the table

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