Emergency Nurse Practitioner programs? - page 2

Hey all, I'm beginning to get the itch to do something more with my BSN. I really like the idea of being an ENP, but I haven't found too many schools offering it specifically. So far:... Read More

  1. by   ctbtrini
    I recently graduated from Emory University ENP program in Dec 08. There are a few people in my class who are not working in the ER and have decided to do Family Practice. Along with ER clinical hours we HAVE to do FNP hours, being that we are sitting for a FNP exam, therefore we are more that capable of working in a non-emergency room setting. I even know a past graduates who works with an Ortho group. All this to say, that even though we are taught and are expected to have a emergency room skillset we also know how to function in other settings.
  2. by   DaisyRN, ACNP
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    ooooh!! that's great to know and i think that's how it should be. for some reason, i thought uta only did er hours, but maybe they do it that way too.
  3. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from ctbtrini
    Hello,
    I am currently in the ENP progam at Emory University, It is truly a great program. Along with your ENP classes you take FNP courses because that is the exam you will have to sit for. In the ENP classes we learn everything from suturing to chest tube insertion to intubation. It really is a wide range of skills. The program includes a total of 800 clinical hours (I think) that you split between FNP hours and ENP hours. I think what truly allows for a tailored experience is the many clinical rotations that you have the option to do. Of course you do a set number of hours in a Level 1 trauma center, but you can also do hours in the surgical trauma rotation, or the flight rotation for example. The coordinator for the program knows many people in the medical community here in atlanta and she is really good about getting you good experiences. I am almost finished with my first semester and we have'nt began clinicals yet, so my knowledge is limited, but from what I hear from students who are finishing in December, they have really enjoyed the program despite its extreme intesity.
    I would have loved a program like that. I work in primary care, but moonlight in urgent care. I was certified as an Adult/Geriatric NP (saw ages 12 and up), but needed to see younger kids in urgent care, so I completed a FNP program as well. I don't feel that I got enough ortho experience in my clinicals and we just learned to suture on pigs feet. If I had to do it over again, I would totally do the FNP/ER combo b/c I absolutely LOVE to do procedures!
  4. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from daisyrn
    well, with the enp program thru uta, you sit for the fnp exam... but i still worry about what happens if you don't like the er or want to do something else later. you are stuck. i don't think you can just go off of your fnp certification because your training is only in the er in that program. if i was going to do it again and knew i wanted to do er, i would probably do pa... just because of the scope questions all the time and the ability to transition into other areas, should the er not work out. just my personal opinion...
    i don't get it...if you are certified as a fnp, then you can certainly work in the primary care setting.
  5. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from skinc1
    Hey I followed the link to UT Houston..where do it say they have a ENP?!
    Well, I graduated from UT-Houston recently as a FNP and they definitely had one last month! I know they changed their webpage layout, so you may have to dig for it. They also have a CRNA program that is ranked 2nd in the country. Now THAT'S what you need to go for!
  6. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from MaleAPRN
    Hi,

    But, our medical director told me a long time before even hiring me as an NP, that he'd rather hire an FNP prepared APN than one that is ER or ACNP prepared. Why? As an FNP, I am able to see OB and Peds patients.

    Vince.
    There's an ACNP/FNP dual degree at Vanderbilt and the NP would be able to see patients of all ages in and out of the hospital. I guess I don't know enough about ACNP's, so are they usually either "Adult" or "Pediatric"? If so, forget it. I was an ANP/GNP and went back to get my FNP b/c I needed to be able to see kids under 12. Looking back, it was great experience (tons of extra clinical hours), but a royal pain in the arse having to go back to school and very $$$! Definitely either do the FNP only or the ACNP/FNP combo b/c both can work in the ER or primary care. However, you'll need the ACNP behind your name if you're going to work in other areas of the hospital.
  7. by   DaisyRN, ACNP
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    no... just because you are certified in fnp doesn't mean you can do primary care. if the board was to investigate and realize that you did all of your hours in an er setting, you are not to function in the primary care setting... simply because your training does not allow it. the enp program i was talking about just has you sit for the fnp cert exam after you're done, so you get the full age spectrum... and i'm not saying i think its right. i think they should just have an enp certificate. but like the other poster said, her enp program required them to do fnp clinical time too... so that would be different... and you would be able to function in the primary setting.



    Quote from anpfnpgnp
    i don't get it...if you are certified as a fnp, then you can certainly work in the primary care setting.
  8. by   traumaRUs
    Agree Daisy - they need to have an ENP exam. I'm an adult health CNS who did most of my hours in a level one trauma center.
  9. by   DaisyRN, ACNP
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    yes, acnps are either adult or pediatric...

    to function most effectively in the er, the age range of the fnp is generally preferred. i am not in the er so it's not an issue... but as i worked in the er before i was an np, i considered it. the medical director said we could put it in my contract that i would not be allowed to see pediatrics or ob patients if i were to be hired. i decided to go with cardiology instead... and you're right about needing acnp cert in the hospital setting... even though there are still some fnps in the acute care setting. (i am not going down that road right now... *lol*)




    Quote from anpfnpgnp
    there's an acnp/fnp dual degree at vanderbilt and the np would be able to see patients of all ages in and out of the hospital. i guess i don't know enough about acnp's, so are they usually either "adult" or "pediatric"? if so, forget it. i was an anp/gnp and went back to get my fnp b/c i needed to be able to see kids under 12. looking back, it was great experience (tons of extra clinical hours), but a royal pain in the arse having to go back to school and very $$$! definitely either do the fnp only or the acnp/fnp combo b/c both can work in the er or primary care. however, you'll need the acnp behind your name if you're going to work in other areas of the hospital.
  10. by   ktrees
    hello everyone,

    I need your help I am completing my DNP. I am a ER Np - I have a FNP, WHNP and CNM.

    I am doing a needs assessment. I want NP's and PA input.

    1. How many NP ER programs are out there? I see Jacksonville, Emory, Vanderbilt and Alabama? are there more?


    2. NP's working in ER setting what would you have liked to have seen in your program that would have helped you to work in the ER

    ie.... ortho, cardiac, opthamology rotations


    I hear that you fear being isolated to ER so maybe an FNP with a Concentration in ER

    any other thoughts that need to be assessed let me know


    Karen
  11. by   mwboswell
    Quote from daisyrn, acnp
    no... just because you are certified in fnp doesn't mean you can do primary care. if the board was to investigate and realize that you did all of your hours in an er setting, you are not to function in the primary care setting...
    i disagree here.... because you are "certified" as an fnp you would have full privledges (sp) to practice as an fnp - trust me all those third party payor forms (blue cross, state farm, railroad, tricare et al) don't ask about your clinical training, they want to know what your national cerfication is....

    Quote from daisyrn, acnp
    that you did all of your hours in an er setting, you are not to function in the primary care setting.
    if you did all your hours in an er setting, then your graduate program would not fit the requisite criteria to take the fnp certification.

    Quote from daisyrn, acnp
    the enp program i was talking about just has you sit for the fnp cert exam after you're done,
    read the ancc certification requirements, you can only sit for those certifications which your graduate program meets the critiera of preparation for.

    Quote from daisyrn, acnp
    the enp program i was talking about just has you sit for the fnp cert exam after you're done, so you get the full age spectrum... and i'm not saying i think its right. i think they should just have an enp certificate.
    the enp thing is still up in the air right now. the scope of practice is it's early forms and continues to evolve. i would be cautious right now with the program offerings. i personally would wait for the national certification to be originated, and then allow the graduate programs to "adjust" to ensure their compliance with the required program content pieces.

    hope this helps.
    -mb
  12. by   traumaRUs
    Loyola in Chicago has what they call an ENP program - however, you sit the ACNP exam. Then....believe it or not they see kids! At a recent (Mar 09) ENA oonference in Chicago I talked with the dean of the nursing program and she told me that since this program has peds ER clinicals, their grads can see peds. Unsure how the IL BON views this.
  13. by   mwboswell
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Loyola in Chicago has what they call an ENP program - however, you sit the ACNP exam. Then....believe it or not they see kids! At a recent (Mar 09) ENA oonference in Chicago I talked with the dean of the nursing program and she told me that since this program has peds ER clinicals, their grads can see peds. Unsure how the IL BON views this.
    Hmmm, that very interesting.

    I would say if the "intent" in seeing PEDS ER pt's is for "PEDS ER" exposure, then it does not fulfill the clinical for FNP PEDS.

    I would think that ANCC "assumes" that if PEDS is listed in the program curricula towards an FNP focus prorgram, then the PEDS component is also looking at health promotion, primary care, and prevention. Also things like normal growth and development; while "nice" to know and work with in the ED - definitely aren't the focus of care.

    If I were a Dean and/or a program director for this program, I would be very cautious how the program objectives and competencies were worded.

    The whole point I think is that advance practice programs need to back off from the ENP for just a bit and lets see what the certifying entities decide to do. I sure would hate for a student or an employer, spend their money on a program which, when the certification is developed, doesn't meet the criteria, AND, limits the graduate in their practice oppotunities.

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