CRA vs. CRC

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    Can someone clarify the corporate structure used in clinical research? For instance, what is the difference from CRA to CRC. I noticed many CRA positions call for an amount of years experience working as a CRA but where does the CRC position fit in the equation? Thanks
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  2. 8 Comments so far...

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    I am also interested in this as the position I am interviewing for requires CRC within twp years of hire. TIA
    Last edit by ICRN2008 on Aug 7, '07 : Reason: corrected information
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    I'm guessing it's Clinical Research Assistant and Clinical Research Coordinator. What these titles reflect however may have more to do with each organization's job description as opposed to a generally accepted definition.

    I'm also guessing that, in general, the CRA positions have less responsibilities than the CRC positions. Though I recently ran across two CRC positions - one required a RN and involved the nurse running several studies from start to finish whereas the other one didn't require a RN and was mostly limited to coordinating patient appointments throughout the study period.
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    Quote from jjjoy
    I'm guessing it's Clinical Research Assistant and Clinical Research Coordinator. What these titles reflect however may have more to do with each organization's job description as opposed to a generally accepted definition.

    I'm also guessing that, in general, the CRA positions have less responsibilities than the CRC positions. Though I recently ran across two CRC positions - one required a RN and involved the nurse running several studies from start to finish whereas the other one didn't require a RN and was mostly limited to coordinating patient appointments throughout the study period.
    A CRA is a clinical research associate. This would be a QA/QC (monitoring) position that usually requires 2 or more years experience in clinical trials. They are not above or below a CRC necessarily, however monitors usually receive greater compensation.
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    Quote from BSNDec06
    I am also interested in this as the position I am interviewing for requires CRC within twp years of hire. TIA

    I am also interested in Research as well.
    Has anyone worked with Sickle Cell Patients? and/or Sickle Cell Research?
    I am in the process of beginning some of my prereqs, and will apply for the LPN program, at my cc(need to start work asap).

    My future plans: I am going to finish the LPN, work for a year, transition to RN, then BSN, and continue with Masters.
    My goal is to one day work with Sickle Cell patients and/or Sickle Cell Research. Are there any nurses out there, that have experience with Sickle Cell Patients or the Research?
    MomenTs likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from jjjoy
    I'm guessing it's Clinical Research Assistant and Clinical Research Coordinator. What these titles reflect however may have more to do with each organization's job description as opposed to a generally accepted definition.

    I'm also guessing that, in general, the CRA positions have less responsibilities than the CRC positions. Though I recently ran across two CRC positions - one required a RN and involved the nurse running several studies from start to finish whereas the other one didn't require a RN and was mostly limited to coordinating patient appointments throughout the study period.
    In the mid-ninties I was a CRA for several studies at the facility I worked at. I scheduled all appointments, the investigator admitted patients to the study. I did all the prep and blood work. I sent in the specimens. I met with the QA/QC on timely basis ( at times up to 6 in one visit as our facility was the 3rd highest enroller in the country). I charted, I filled out all outgoing paperwork. I attended the meetings prior to the start of a study throughout the country. The last study I was involved with included 16 cuntries, with Sweden the head of this particular study. I charged my facility x amount of dollars per patient, the facility itself and the investigater were compensated along with our patients.

    Very strict protocols are folllowed and I love clinical research. I have participated in Phase 3 and 4 studies. I would do it again in a minute. I am an LPN and received very good written references from the pharmaceutical companies.

    I should add that I did not have hospital patients that required IV meds, I was not qualified for that. However I did receive hospital privleges to review charts and to see that our hospitalized patients received the correct blood draws at the correct times. We mainly were involved with HTN and Antibiotic studies. I have also worked with a study involving breast implants.

    After I complete my RN Iam interested in returning to research or another arena of patient care.

    I believe that many areas mentioned above have changed over to RN's and BSN's.

    I still think there are "assistants at various places for scheduling and other tasks, perhaps paperwork keeping and files. And of course answering phones and taking messages.
    MomenTs likes this.
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    What you have described is a CRC position. A CRA position is an auditing position. CRAs work on behalf of the sponsor making sure that the study was performed according to protocol. The ACRP is one of the credentialing bodies that certifies CRCs, CRAs, CTIs and CPI. Their website www.acrpnet.org describes the postions in greater detail.
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    Quote from anc33
    What you have described is a CRC position. A CRA position is an auditing position. CRAs work on behalf of the sponsor making sure that the study was performed according to protocol. The ACRP is one of the credentialing bodies that certifies CRCs, CRAs, CTIs and CPI. Their website www.acrpnet.org describes the postions in greater detail.
    Thanks for the correction. I did originally write the post up as a CRC, but wasn't sure as I am aware of changes in the industry. I've book-marked he website!
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    Yes, it can definitely be confusing, especially since many of these job titles were not defined until the early 90s!


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