What colleges offer RN - BSN for graduates of ITT Tech? - page 2

by Tj14

6,366 Views | 14 Comments

:heartbeat What schools offer RN -BSN for graduates of ITT Tech? I'm looking at going to ITT Tech for their associate degree program. However, I want to work for a year and then return to school for my BSN.:heartbeat... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Tj14
    :heartbeat What schools offer RN -BSN for graduates of ITT Tech? I'm looking at going to ITT Tech for their associate degree program. However, I want to work for a year and then return to school for my BSN.:heartbeat
    I'd say look at any conventional diploma or associate degree RN nursing program, and forget ITT, for the same reasons the others said: You already know that you want to wind up a BSRN or higher.

    In my region, we still have diploma nursing programs, but they require so many college courses that they are equivalent to associate degree programs, may offer more clinical experience, and they usually don't care where your college credits are from, so long as the content is acceptable.

    Also, ITT's cost for that RN has to be obscenely high, because their electronics and other 2-years are like $50,000 or more now.

    One diploma program here costs only $12,000 but that is only the RN part and does not include all the college work. I know of one that's 28 months start to finish, starting from scratch and includes all the college, and its total cost is in the $29,999 range. An associate degree RN might be $20,000 - $25,000 at a community college or state college.

    Find your state's "OneStop" website for unemployed people. Find the WIA / TRA Training Providers list, and all of the reasonable affordable RN programs should be on there, and should also have data like the total duration, total package cost with all books supplies uniforms & all, plus some salary data for the grads of it.
    JacobK likes this.
  2. 1
    Why do people say that ITT Tech's Nursing isn't "conventional?" If that means that it's not that old, that's true. . . the truth is that the program is costly, but they have state-of-the-art nursing labs, all books are included in tuition, the parking and tutoring are free, there is individual attention to every student, and we have access to a data library of over 60,000 resources which are free to us...so no, they aren't conventional, and I'm glad
    imanursedogonit likes this.
  3. 0
    I took the HESI exam and scored a 90.24% out of all the applicants im the 4th to score at least a 90% and have a place in the March of 2011 class. I am very excited.
  4. 0
    Quote from Streamline2010
    I'd say look at any conventional diploma or associate degree RN nursing program, and forget ITT, for the same reasons the others said: You already know that you want to wind up a BSRN or higher.

    In my region, we still have diploma nursing programs, but they require so many college courses that they are equivalent to associate degree programs, may offer more clinical experience, and they usually don't care where your college credits are from, so long as the content is acceptable.

    Also, ITT's cost for that RN has to be obscenely high, because their electronics and other 2-years are like $50,000 or more now.

    One diploma program here costs only $12,000 but that is only the RN part and does not include all the college work. I know of one that's 28 months start to finish, starting from scratch and includes all the college, and its total cost is in the $29,999 range. An associate degree RN might be $20,000 - $25,000 at a community college or state college.

    Find your state's "OneStop" website for unemployed people. Find the WIA / TRA Training Providers list, and all of the reasonable affordable RN programs should be on there, and should also have data like the total duration, total package cost with all books supplies uniforms & all, plus some salary data for the grads of it.

    Your quotes are high! 20-25K for a cc? My ADN cost me a whopping $4,500 plus books at my local community college!
  5. 0
    Oregon Community College nursing programs - do you mean OCNE programs? I understand OCNE students must compete with high grades once in the OCNE program to "articulate" into the RN to BSN programs as promoted. Sounds reasonable.... But really, it sounds like having to apply to a program with just less paperwork. You still have to comepete with others for seats in a program, right?

    If numbers are meaningful to you, and you are looking at OCNE, consider seeking statistics. Accreditors should be able to let you know how the numbers measure up and what standards are most desired. If accreditiors don't post or publish their standards, why would they mind a phone call?

    1. Seek percentage of OCNE graduates going into the promoted BSN articulation programs. If it is high, great. If you think it is low, ask why? The answer might be important.
    2. If GPA counts toward articulation within a program. Seek cohort GPA's on entry, and on graduation. While grades may be an indicator of individual student ability, some may feel drastic GPA changes within a cohort - may be an important indicator of program instruction quality. Consider for example; if the majority of a cohort goes from 4.0 students to 2.0, ....does it sound right? What might that mean to your goal of going from ADN/ASN to BSN?
    3. Number of starting seats, over graduating seats within the last 3-5 recent cohorts. History often repeats. To me, it's not a bargain, if a program has a high historical probability of elimination before graduation - especially if the standards to get into the program are already high.
    4. Consider how many seats are possible to fill in a given program, and how many are filled. An implied lack of ability or lack of desire to fill available seats wthin a nursing program - especially with a projected national RN shortage crisis on the horizon -might mean something.

    Check with students within a given program. See if published statistics match what students inside the program perceive. If the percieved and posted statistics vary, consider what thay may mean to you.

    Where possible, go with raw numbers. Calculate your own percentages. This may help prevent pitfalls from "Creative Statistical Accounting Measures". If people get rude, and don't want to share their numbers...let that indicate whatever you feel it should.


Top