NY State may require nurses to obtain 4-year degrees - page 65

by brian 72,073 Views | 648 Comments Admin

But some worry that an already severe shortage will become worse. New York is mulling over a requirement that would force all RNs to earn a bachelorís degree in order to keep their RN certification ó a step that critics... Read More


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    I work in NY with my hard earned Associate Degree. I've had BSN students assigned to me and associate students assigned to me. The associate students know more about "hands-on" care and skills than the BSN. Nursing isn't always how the book reads. I'm proud of my degree and wouldn't change a thing unless forced into it.
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    Quote from Chilly_hands
    I work in NY with my hard earned Associate Degree. I've had BSN students assigned to me and associate students assigned to me. The associate students know more about "hands-on" care and skills than the BSN. Nursing isn't always how the book reads. I'm proud of my degree and wouldn't change a thing unless forced into it.
    That's a poor reflection of the BSN school there. I orient and precept both as well and find no difference in the skill levels and "hands on". So it's just a regional thing. Don't make the presumption that BSNs have less hands on and are full of book knowledge only.
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    There are many areas that Professional doesn't require a Bachelors or a Masters, nursing is one of them. I've seen what comes out of the local BSN program and it's far from professional and it's all the same test. Don't worry, NY will be reversing this idiotic requirement too.
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    Quote from Tweety
    That's a poor reflection of the BSN school there. I orient and precept both as well and find no difference in the skill levels and "hands on". So it's just a regional thing. Don't make the presumption that BSNs have less hands on and are full of book knowledge only.

    Maybe yours is just a regional thing seeing no difference. I know three areas who will all tell you the same thing and in this particular area, the ADN program really does have more experience -- 35% more clinical hours than the BSN program. It just lacks the management courses. I've worked in hospitals in 3 different areas and almost without exception, the ADN grads are far more competent on the floor the first 3 months out of school than the BSN students. Plus, they are easier to get along with and dont have that "...I just graduated, don't tell ME how to do things" attitude
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    Good Afternoon,
    Can we just all get along. Always something out there to create a separation. First of all, we all need each other. Second, it depends on the individual. I've been in both programs, ADN first & BSN 2nd. Yes, I have a BSN & very glad those instructors brain wash me to get my BSN. ADN's are not more competent than the BSN's. Most BSN program cover everything an ADN program with clinical & practical application. Now there may be an ADN individual who have access himself / herself (knowledge) with multi experiences in nursing. I have worked with ADN and knew they were an ADN's. I have worked with an LPN & would take her before I take an new BSN grad. Again, it depends on the indiviual.
    Treasure
  6. 0
    Quote from gdean1
    Maybe yours is just a regional thing seeing no difference. I know three areas who will all tell you the same thing and in this particular area, the ADN program really does have more experience -- 35% more clinical hours than the BSN program. It just lacks the management courses. I've worked in hospitals in 3 different areas and almost without exception, the ADN grads are far more competent on the floor the first 3 months out of school than the BSN students. Plus, they are easier to get along with and dont have that "...I just graduated, don't tell ME how to do things" attitude
    I agree and that's what I was saying that it's regional. The BSNs and ADNs get the same number of clinical hours. Honestly fresh out of school it's hard to tell them apart. Most graduates are humble and willing to learn and don't have an "attitude". However, we're dealing one with a "I just graduated, don't tell me what to do..." and she just happens to be an ADN, but that attitude is rare in both programs.

    Also, the BSN's only get one course in management. The other courses they take care advanced patho/pharm, community health, ethics, research, statistics, advanced physical assessment.

    The difference between the ADNs and BSNs here isn't the number of clinical hours and a few management courses.

    Interesting how things differ around the country isn't it?
    Last edit by Tweety on May 14, '07
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    Quote from gdean1
    There are many areas that Professional doesn't require a Bachelors or a Masters, nursing is one of them.
    I was just talking with a person licensed as a professional (not in nursing) and this came up. I had been under the impression, courtesy of those who profess loudly that the only true professionals are those who hold Bachelor degrees or above, that ONLY nursing was left as a sole profession that did not require a minimum of a Bachelor's. Apparently that's quite mistaken, as the person I was speaking with (who obviously knew his stuff) started rattling off various professional licenses that can be obtained after completion of a high school education and passing the licensing exam. Yes, high school. The knowledge needed to pass the exam could come from experience, not years of classroom time. Wham: professional license obtained.


    Don't worry, NY will be reversing this idiotic requirement too.
    It isn't a requirement now, and never has been. Wishful thinking on the part of beaurocrats and those who believe this new educational minimum will improve the nursing profession as a whole. While I agree that continuing education always benefits the profession, this particular suggestion (BSN as minimum) does not. At least, not in these times of shortage, and believe me, in my area, we DO feel a shortage. Waiting for the ADN graduates every year is painful, as staffing is always, ALWAYS minimal and job vacancies sit there.
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    Quote from RNsRWe
    I wonder if even that would make any difference, at least for another generation or so, as it is so embedded in the public's mind that hospitals still have "nurses in training", and that one becomes a nurse through on the job work. This is totally without regard to the fact that we've had decades' worth of associate degrees in nursing, not to mention bachelor's.

    As I read your post, I thought of a recent post on another thread, one in which a BSN-RN was asked how long it took her to get her license, "was it a year?" When told it was actually a four year process, a bachelor's degree, the person responded in surprise, "just to be a nurse?"

    So, having all BSNs isn't really the image change. Educating the public on what the heck we DO and WHY education on our parts is imperative is the answer.
    You wouldn't have to educate the public on what nurses do if the public knew that the title required a 4-year degree. A light bulb would go off in the individual's head. "hmm, I wonder what they do and certainly it wouldn't be a 4-year requirement for nothing." The interested one's would educate themselves. I see that titles play a big role in the nursing community. Personally, I think it doesn't matter. It's embarrassing to brag about having an BSN when your making maybe 50 cent more. I could have ADN, BSN, MSN, ESPN, MF behind my name if Im not making more, it's vain to argue that I'm better or more qualified than you whether it be true or not, because the truth of the matter is if that were the case it would show in the paycheck.
    Last edit by scholar on May 16, '07
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    Paramedics, Firefighters and police officers aren't bachelor-holders either, though if you don't considder them to be 'professinals' then its a moot point, I suppose. But in ANY case, I'm surprised we're still talking about this non-event (since NY abandoned the idea -or at least shelved it, months ago).


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