Career change - gps not working

  1. 0
    Not sure how to pursue career change. GPS not helping with directions. lol

    I'm a 41 year old male with AAS in CS and after 15 years want to pursue a career in nursing.
    Here in NJ the consensus is you need the bsn or at least a year experience. There seems to be some exceptions.

    I originally wanted to pursue the adn then bsn online after employed but now have hesitation regarding employment.

    my gpa for the aas is 2.7 from 20 years ago. I have since taken certificate programs with 4.0 , my studying habits have improved.

    I can finish the BS in CS in three semesters, then do an accelerated bsn program. It seems strange to do that if I want to leave the CS field.
    At my age the standard bsn seems a little expensive and not sure about acceptance.

    Any recommendations for someone my age with and older AAS and the current employment prospects?
    I have no issue moving anywhere in the US.

    Thanks for reading my first post.
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Is CS, computer science? If so then think about Nursing Informatics.
    There is a continuing need for people who have background in CS and
    nursing to help navigate advancing issues with computer use in health.

    If state borders are no problem, and you can work anywhere, the
    BSN is now preferred in many areas. If you finish the CS you could then
    pursue the BSN.

    Now you would have the option of working in nursing only, or combine
    with your previous experience.

    Good luck with your career goals, take it one course at a time and
    soon you will have new work options open to you!

    Best wishes!
  5. 0
    jahra,

    thanks for the response. Yes computer science. currently network administration.
    I looked at informatics and it seems like a popular growing field. I have read current nurses who wish for a change but stay in healthcare have shown interest, especially with the background seems helpful.

    I was looking to leave IT and accounting or finance does not seem interesting to me. I like working with others on a team. Nursing has caught my interest and have been reading a lot on it.
    Providing care for others sounds like something I would like.
    I have been reading that others my age have switched careers to nursing.
    I like the idea of obtaining the ADN to get your foot in the door to later pursue the BSN, but the hospitals are working toward to closing this route. I agree if your younger and have the finances the BSN is the best route.
    Finding how to pay living expenses while taking all of the study courses is staggering.
  6. 0
    Quote from NJprospect
    jahra,


    Finding how to pay living expenses while taking all of the study courses is staggering.
    Then if its in your , go the ADN route first. My thoughts above were that it would
    be a advantage to get the BS in CS if you are close to the degree in credits.
    ADN is not completely closed, so you still have some time to get started.

    Having more than one field today is an advantage, its a tough market and hopefully
    nursing will open up more options by the time you finish...

    Some of the pre reqs can be taken on line but be careful to make sure they will count
    toward your degree..
  7. 0
    The BSN is preferable. It is preferable from the get go to save time and money. However, most people base their school decision on which programs accept them. If you apply to several programs and the only one to accept you is an ADN program, then you start there. It is nicer if you are accepted to more than one, then you can use your own criteria to choose which program to attend. I would not be too concerned with the employment picture until you get closer to graduation because for the most part an employer is interested in your clear license more than your degree and a new grad is a new grad. Good luck.
  8. 0
    Quote from NJprospect
    Not sure how to pursue career change. GPS not helping with directions. lol

    I'm a 41 year old male with AAS in CS and after 15 years want to pursue a career in nursing.
    Here in NJ the consensus is you need the bsn or at least a year experience. There seems to be some exceptions.

    I originally wanted to pursue the adn then bsn online after employed but now have hesitation regarding employment.

    my gpa for the aas is 2.7 from 20 years ago. I have since taken certificate programs with 4.0 , my studying habits have improved.

    I can finish the BS in CS in three semesters, then do an accelerated bsn program. It seems strange to do that if I want to leave the CS field.
    At my age the standard bsn seems a little expensive and not sure about acceptance.

    Any recommendations for someone my age with and older AAS and the current employment prospects?
    I have no issue moving anywhere in the US.

    Thanks for reading my first post.
    My first suggestion is to make sure that nursing is what you truly want. You will invest very substantial amounts of both time and money in getting a nursing degree, so making sure that's the direction you want to go is really the vital first step.

    If your are reasonably certain about nursing being the right career, you have two basic options: An associates degree or bachelors (technically there is the third option of a hospital diploma program, which turns out highly competent nurses but at this stage, is really an anachronism in the middle to late stages of extinction). Either the ADN or BSN will get you to registered nurse but the trend is running toward requiring the BSN as the minimum educational credential. While new nurses in general are finding it tough to find jobs, in many parts of the country, ADN's are having a more difficult time than BSN's. So the advice would be to go for the BSN if possible.

    That said, the simplest and least expensive route to the BSN may be to get your ADN, pass the boards and then enroll in an on-line RN-BSN program. Going this route may take a bit longer (the ADN is not really a 2-year degree - it will almost certainly take you more time than that) but if can be far less costly. I'm not sure what CC tuition in NJ is but here in PA, the ADN program at my CC is less than $7,000. There are a number of on-line RN-BSN programs offered by some very good schools that will run you less than $10,000. Some are even less than that: I'm in the RN-BSN program at Ohio and my total tuition will be just over $7,000.

    Another advantage of getting your ADN first is that you may be able find a nursing job after graduation, which not only will give you employment and experience but may also provide with tuition assistance for the RN-BSN program. It may be difficult to find a nursing job as and ADN-RN in NJ (it is very difficult where I am in SE PA) but your said you are open to moving. My understanding is that there are still some parts of the US, mostly rural, that will welcome ADN's.

    AS far as admission to ADN programs, my CC relies on the scores on the standardized nursing school tests (TEAS or NET). Admission is competitive, meaning that you need to get a good score to get in but your previous GPA is not a factor.

    Good Luck!
  9. 0
    Quote from chuckster
    My first suggestion is to make sure that nursing is what you truly want. You will invest very substantial amounts of both time and money in getting a nursing degree, so making sure that's the direction you want to go is really the vital first step.

    If your are reasonably certain about nursing being the right career, you have two basic options: An associates degree or bachelors (technically there is the third option of a hospital diploma program, which turns out highly competent nurses but at this stage, is really an anachronism in the middle to late stages of extinction). Either the ADN or BSN will get you to registered nurse but the trend is running toward requiring the BSN as the minimum educational credential. While new nurses in general are finding it tough to find jobs, in many parts of the country, ADN's are having a more difficult time than BSN's. So the advice would be to go for the BSN if possible.

    That said, the simplest and least expensive route to the BSN may be to get your ADN, pass the boards and then enroll in an on-line RN-BSN program. Going this route may take a bit longer (the ADN is not really a 2-year degree - it will almost certainly take you more time than that) but if can be far less costly. I'm not sure what CC tuition in NJ is but here in PA, the ADN program at my CC is less than $7,000. There are a number of on-line RN-BSN programs offered by some very good schools that will run you less than $10,000. Some are even less than that: I'm in the RN-BSN program at Ohio and my total tuition will be just over $7,000.

    Another advantage of getting your ADN first is that you may be able find a nursing job after graduation, which not only will give you employment and experience but may also provide with tuition assistance for the RN-BSN program. It may be difficult to find a nursing job as and ADN-RN in NJ (it is very difficult where I am in SE PA) but your said you are open to moving. My understanding is that there are still some parts of the US, mostly rural, that will welcome ADN's.

    AS far as admission to ADN programs, my CC relies on the scores on the standardized nursing school tests (TEAS or NET). Admission is competitive, meaning that you need to get a good score to get in but your previous GPA is not a factor.

    Good Luck!
    Thanks for all the tips. I am recently out of work and while on unemployment was brainstorming different choices.
    I was thinking of moving to another state to find work and also changing careers.
    Nursing is the other career I am considering.
    I have $38K in savings but can not expect to collect unemployment for full duration of school? Rent, car, food, & health cost $17K/yr with no family support. I am trying to figure out what part-time job pays for living expenses and if it would work around a BSN program or an ADN one.


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