Which path would you take to BSN? - page 2

I already have a BS (and MS, shhh, lots of $$'s shelled out and now a career change!) :nono: and want to be a nurse. I just completed a CNA course and I KNOW now that this is the right decision. ... Read More

  1. by   CrazyPremed
    To the OP,

    I am actually in this situation. I, eventually, want to go the nurse practioner route. I have a BS, and - in my area - there are a couple of accelerated programs for second degree BSN students. I decided that I would take the prereqs for the ADN and the BSN, and whichever program I got into first - and was financially reasonable - would win. I just got accepted to the ADN program on Tuesday :wink2: . I'll go through that, and work as LPN, then RN while I do a bridge program for my BSN. In this area, hospitals use both tuition reimbursement and tuition prepayment for nursing programs. 4 nurses that I work with in the ER are in such RN-BSN prepayment programs. I would really research the options available. If I would have gone the accelerated BSN route, it would have meant $30,000, and no full time RN work experience when graduating. This way, I'll have no debt, and I will have 2 years experience as an LPN/RN when I obtain my BSN. If I so desire, I can apply directly to graduate school. Make sure to look at your options. Just my 2 cents.

    Quote from MBA2BRN
    With all of the loans people take out ($40,000-60,000 for a Regular BSN or $20,000-40,000 Accelerated BSN, where people already have old student loans), such programs are a JOKE! If people were better with math they would realize that nurses do not make enough to not feel POOR/BROKE after taking out that much debt once he/she starts working as a Registered Nurse! Alas, our society is bad at math!
    I don't agree with this quote. As someone with a BS who doesn't work in my graduating field (which is extremely common these days), becoming a registered nurse will actually double my earning potential. Of course, this depends upon the state in which one lives, but - on average - RN's can make a liveable salary. Even with taking out $30,000, the average monthly payments - when subtracted from a nurse's salary, can still mean an increase. For example, a loan (including interest) of $40,000 payed over 10 years (the average for student loans) equals a monthly payment of $333.33. This works out to (at 36 hr/wk) a cost of $2.32 per hour. So, if becoming a registered nurse would mean an increase of pay of at least $2.32 per hour, then it is a good investment.

    I don't know where you guys live or what you make now, but going to nursing school will as sure as h*** give me - a four-year college grad - more than a $2.30 an hour raise! It's a great investment!

    Disclaimer: we could get into inflation and all that jazz, but I'm just proving a quick point!

    CrazyPremed
    Last edit by CrazyPremed on Oct 8, '06
  2. by   mvanz9999
    I'm not exactly sure, but it would be a decrease in pay for me. I make around $50K (also not working in the area of my BFA). The going rate for new RN's in Chicago is about $23.00 an hour. That's roughly $48,000 a year. Add the $333.33 per year in repayment, and I'd make a h**luvva lot less. Which is why I've removed the BSN option for myself. It's either ADN or directly to Masters. Depending on any aid and so on...

    I have to agree with MBA2BRN on this one. At least in this area, that's the deal you're going to get.
    Last edit by mvanz9999 on Oct 5, '06
  3. by   CrazyPremed
    Quote from mvanz9999
    I'm not exactly sure, but it would be a decrease in pay for me. I make around $50K (also not working in the area of my BFA). The going rate for new RN's in Chicago is about $23.00 an hour. That's roughly $48,000 a year. Add the $333.33 per year in repayment, and I'd make a h**luvva lot less. Which is why I've removed the BSN option for myself. It's either ADN or directly to Masters. Depending on any aid and so on...

    I have to agree with MBA2BRN on this one. At least in this area, that's the deal you're going to get.
    Then why go into nursing?

    CrazyPremed
  4. by   MEO82
    Quote from CrazyPremed
    Then why go into nursing?

    CrazyPremed
  5. by   JaxiaKiley
    Personally, I'd do the BSN. I think it would be hard, but worth it.
  6. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from CrazyPremed
    Then why go into nursing?

    CrazyPremed
    Is this an actual question?

    Hmmmmm....

    Many reasons. A) I hate my pointless job and there's not enough money to make it worth doing for the next 30+ years. B) The job prospects are few and far between. I'm currently stuck with a 2 hour commute each way because there aren't any other jobs. C) I have absolutely no qualifications for what I'm doing, which makes everything that much harder. See reason A for not having any interest in getting qualified.
  7. by   CrazyPremed
    So I think that we agree that nursing - although not as financially lucrative as some would hope - would mean an increase in pay for many of us. This takes us back to the point of nursing school being a definite investment. Between potential promotions (certifications, playing charge nurse :wink2: , becoming a APN, CNS, etc.), raises due to experience, and the occasional overtime shift, nurses easily can make equal to or more than their college-graduate counterparts.

    For many, this will mean living on a budget, taking out some loans, or holding on to certain types of jobs temporarily, but - eventually - it will probably pay off. Let's keep our heads up, remember that our investment (financial or otherwise) will pay off, and keep our eyes on the prize! Good luck, everyone.

    CrazyPremed
  8. by   nynurse2be
    LovesDisney,

    I'm in a somewhat similar situation. I have a BA and MA, but the MA was paid for by my employer (I worked for a university). I still do have enormous BA loans though.

    I do not have children, but want to finish my BSN before I do. My husband makes a pretty decent salary, but not enough for us to live on entirely. I need to work, or take out more loans if I am to go to school full time.

    I think the ADN/RN vs. accelerated BSN really is so personal. I can see either way working best, depending on circumstances. I think no matter the route, there will be hard work involved, lots of juggling of responsibilities, and sacrifice. For me, I'd rather do it in one year rather than spread out, and start an NP program as soon as possible. But I can see the benefits of taking more time, and trying to find an employer with generous tuition remission.

    I wish you the best of luck. I know this isn't an easy decision.
  9. by   DUECSON
    I'm having to make a decision as well. I have BS in Psych. I am an LPN at a military facility. I applied to 2 LPN-RN programs And 1 BSN program. The BSN program is about 2 hours away and the bridge programs are 35min-1 1/2 hr. I'm thinking of going into the Navy Nurse Corps program. They pay for your schooling and give you about 1500.00 monthly, 20k-25K signon 3-4 yr active obligation,bonus or/and a 30671. loan repayment for 5 yrs of active duty obligation once school is completed. This program is for those in their last two yrs of a BSN program.
  10. by   AZmom
    I would caution anyone thinking loan payback will be easy with their greater earning potential to take a look at the new graduate forum here. Despite the supposed nursing shortage, jobs are NOT always that easy to come by. Some new grads are unemployed months, many many months.

    I know, I was shocked too but now see how it makes sense. Hospitals simply do not have the manpower to take on all new grads, who require extensive training. So some grads wait, and wait, and wait, interviewing themselves into the ground, hoping for an opportunity to be employed, and freaking about how they're going to make those first several student loan payments when they've got no income.

    That's not meant to be a pitch for ADN. Everyone has to choose what's right for them. Just make sure you have all the facts and are realistic in your expectations.
  11. by   nynurse2be
    Quote from AZmom
    I would caution anyone thinking loan payback will be easy with their greater earning potential to take a look at the new graduate forum here. Despite the supposed nursing shortage, jobs are NOT always that easy to come by. Some new grads are unemployed months, many many months.

    I know, I was shocked too but now see how it makes sense. Hospitals simply do not have the manpower to take on all new grads, who require extensive training. So some grads wait, and wait, and wait, interviewing themselves into the ground, hoping for an opportunity to be employed, and freaking about how they're going to make those first several student loan payments when they've got no income.

    That's not meant to be a pitch for ADN. Everyone has to choose what's right for them. Just make sure you have all the facts and are realistic in your expectations.
    I agree, and also from what my nurse relatives tell me, demand for nurses is cyclical. Some remember times when even in NYC, where demand is currently high, when they couldn't be so choosey about their jobs.
  12. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from CrazyPremed
    So I think that we agree that nursing - although not as financially lucrative as some would hope - would mean an increase in pay for many of us. This takes us back to the point of nursing school being a definite investment. Between potential promotions (certifications, playing charge nurse :wink2: , becoming a APN, CNS, etc.), raises due to experience, and the occasional overtime shift, nurses easily can make equal to or more than their college-graduate counterparts.
    No, you don't get it. It will not mean an increase in salary (despite promotional opportunities) if you take out too much loan debt. You will be as BROKE or worse off then your counterparts who work in other professions making less money.

    The bottom line is, debt = bad/BROKE/your money making money for others. No debt = money you earned that has the potential to make you more money.

    Have you ever met a broke nurse???? I have... plenty! I worked in Health Care for years before changing careers. Let me say this, you will probably be one of them since you do not understand how money (interest, debts, etc.) works.

    There was a post on here where a poster broke it down so well because he/she worked in the financial sector forever before changing careers. Anyway, that poster is also going the ADN then RN-BSN route despite having prior degrees. Why? He/She is smart with money.
    Last edit by SummerGarden on Oct 8, '06
  13. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from AZmom
    I would caution anyone thinking loan payback will be easy with their greater earning potential to take a look at the new graduate forum here. Despite the supposed nursing shortage, jobs are NOT always that easy to come by. Some new grads are unemployed months, many many months.

    I know, I was shocked too but now see how it makes sense. Hospitals simply do not have the manpower to take on all new grads, who require extensive training. So some grads wait, and wait, and wait, interviewing themselves into the ground, hoping for an opportunity to be employed, and freaking about how they're going to make those first several student loan payments when they've got no income.

    That's not meant to be a pitch for ADN. Everyone has to choose what's right for them. Just make sure you have all the facts and are realistic in your expectations.
    Good post! I try to tell people what you are telling them, but no one wants to listen. Most people are going to find out the HARD way that in many places the words "nursing shortage" does not include new grads.

    They will also find out the hard way that the politics behind obtaining and keeping jobs (including promotions) in nursing is NO DIFFERENT then other career fields. Thus any debts incurred for a degree in nursing is no more "worth it" then any other degree! At least not financially.

    Good luck to you, keep on posting and spreading the word!
    Last edit by SummerGarden on Oct 8, '06

close