Certification (EMT or phlebotomy) before applying to ABSN programs

  1. 0 In Fall 2014 I will be applying to several ABSN programs, one of which is CSUN's ABSN program. I'm currently a student at CSUN finishing my BA in Psychology. I found some information on CSUN's ABSN program website which states that competitive applicants are those who have either an EMT or phlebotomy certification. Any advice on which certification would be best and most useful? I found a pretty good EMT certification program at College of the Canyons. However, I'm having difficulty finding a good, reputable phlebotomy certification program. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!
  2. Enjoy this?

    Join thousands and get our weekly Nursing Insights newsletter with the hottest, discussions, articles, and toons.


  3. Visit  ElizabethH736} profile page

    About ElizabethH736

    From 'Valley village, California'; Joined Jun '13; Posts: 122; Likes: 38.

    12 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Kuriin} profile page
    0
    EMT would be the best certification you can have. We have 3 or so EMTs in our class and they have an edge.
  5. Visit  SopranoKris} profile page
    0
    I'm a phlebotomy tech and I say go for EMT. You'll get more hands on patient care experience.

    While phlebotomy helped me feel comfortable talking to patients while performing an unpleasant procedure, it can tend to be a monotonous task day in & out. I did learn a lot of helpful info about lab values that I'm using in my 1st semester of nursing school. I feel confident I'll be able to find a good vein when we're ready to insert IVs.

    There are pros & cons to each. I got my certification through a community college. Still can't find a job as a PBT in a hospital. I don't think they want to spend the time training me just to have me transfer into an RN position later.
  6. Visit  akulahawkRN} profile page
    0
    Of those two certifications, EMT will serve you better because you'll at least have some idea about how to do a physical exam and take vital signs. Neither will, in and of themselves, help you get a job after RN school is done.
  7. Visit  anichka} profile page
    0
    This is interesting to me... I am in an EMT-B class right now and more than one nurse at my job (I also work as a CNA) has asked me "Why bother?" (they know I am doing the pre-reqs for nursing). They seem to think it is a big waste of time. It's something I've wanted to do for a long time, though, so when an opportunity came up, I took it.

    I am doing mine for free because I volunteer at fire dept. If you have the time to do it, you might look into something like that so you don't have to pay for it (plus you'll get the experience).
  8. Visit  akulahawkRN} profile page
    0
    As a CNA, your training and experience will have a bigger impact upon your practice as a nurse than EMT training actually will. That being said, you'll probably get more experience actually assessing patients as an EMT than you will as a CNA. I'm sure you're also finding out that EMT and CNA (and nursing in general) are different animals.

    Once you go nursing, put EMT on the back burner until you're done.
  9. Visit  ElizabethH736} profile page
    0
    Thank you everyone for the advice, it's very helpful! I'm looking to do the EMT-B program during the winter at College of the Canyons. Trying to be as competitive of a nursing applicant as possible!
  10. Visit  akulahawkRN} profile page
    0
    Quote from ElizabethH736
    Thank you everyone for the advice, it's very helpful! I'm looking to do the EMT-B program during the winter at College of the Canyons. Trying to be as competitive of a nursing applicant as possible!
    I think something that I forgot to mention is that when it comes to having additional licenses/certifications, they seem to typically give weight to only one that you would have. So if you have phlebotomy and EMT certificate, they would only assigned to one of those. So if having some kind of healthcare certificate is worth an additional 3 points and you have 2 healthcare certificates, you get only 3 points, not 6. Make sense?
  11. Visit  anichka} profile page
    0
    Quote from akulahawk
    As a CNA, your training and experience will have a bigger impact upon your practice as a nurse than EMT training actually will. That being said, you'll probably get more experience actually assessing patients as an EMT than you will as a CNA. I'm sure you're also finding out that EMT and CNA (and nursing in general) are different animals.

    Once you go nursing, put EMT on the back burner until you're done.
    Yes, actually, I'm finding out pretty quickly too that the one I thought I would really like (EMT) is less interesting/fulfilling/"fun" than the one I thought I would hate (CNA). I only did the CNA class because one of the nursing programs I want to apply to requires it, but so far, I enjoy the job much more than going on calls.

    Good luck, ElizabethH! The class IS valuable, and at the very least, I feel like a better-prepared mom to my son ;-) (Though truly, EMT work is fun too.)
  12. Visit  Dranger} profile page
    0
    Theres a big difference in doing a EMT-B program and actually working as an EMT. If you can actually get some work experience as an EMT I think that will help, just get the certification won't do much. The training isn't all that helpful in my opinion.
  13. Visit  dtaleton88} profile page
    0
    I'm a working emt who is finishing up prereqs for nursing these classes are also needed to fulfill my paramedic certifications as well. I can agree with dranger just getting the certification isn't enough you need to work you will definetly see if you can handle the stress, blood, and starting Ivs and whatnot. I do have I believe a competitive edge over other pre-nursing students. I can do a lot and will soon be able to use my skills in a different arena.
  14. Visit  CCRNCMC11} profile page
    0
    Don't let anyone tell you that emt experience won't help you in nursing. I got mine while taking pre-reqs and not only does it give you a solid foundation in assessment and in basic skills but it has definitely helped me in getting jobs and in applying for grad schools. Definitely looks good on resumes. Especially if you want to work in ER or ICU. I would say try to use your cert to work as a tech in an Er if they utilize emts. That way it's kind of cna and emt experience
  15. Visit  jennifergrant034} profile page
    0
    Nursing schools are different today than they were 5 or 10 years ago. Seven years ago, one of our local nursing schools was offering a $5000 cash bonus to new students.

    Today, however, the list of applicants is so long, you feel like you need to hand them $5000 in cash just to get two minutes of their time. In the past they were begging for people to enroll in their nursing schools, and today it is common to have 900 to 1200 applicants each year.

    So, yes, you can enjoy benefits in getting certifications prior to applying to nursing school. The decision makers will see you as a student with a higher chance of being a successful student.

    Additionally, I definitely saw that those with any prior experience had a bit of an easier time adapting to nursing school.

    I had absolutely no medical experience, and I flunked out of the first semester of the RN program. In fact, 14 out of 60 of us flunked out. And all 14 of us had no prior experience at all. (That does not mean you cannot make it without any prior experience, it just means that you have a much more difficult time at some schools).

    So after flunking out, I went and took a few classes at the local votech. I took a medical assistant class, a CNA class, and an EKG class. Then I went and enrolled at an LPN program, and graduated as the #2 student. I was very proud of that, because I had come such a long, long way in my nursing education.

    But, now that I have the LPN, I am having trouble finding a job. The places I have gone to say they only hire nurses who have 1 to 3 years of experience. They dont want to hire a graduate without any prior experience. So I have to hunt around for a nursing home or a hospital willing to give me a chance and get that first break.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top